Keeping your Christmas tree in the yard is good for the environment: Nature Conservancy of Canada


CALGARY –

For those looking to find a second act for your Christmas tree, just consider leaving it in the yard.

The Nature Conservancy of Canada suggests letting the urban wildlife that is part of everyone’s garden and backyard do the recycling themselves, instead of letting the city transport it.

Leaving a tree in the yard can provide important habitat for bird populations during the winter months, especially on cold nights and during storms, according to Samantha Knight, National Director of Conservation Science at the NCC.

Conservation calls this practice a small act of conservation.

The process starts with the location: just lean it against another tree, the fence or put it in the garden.

You can even redecorate it with treats to attract wildlife, like pine cones stuffed with peanut butter, peanut strings or chewing tallow for the birds while taking shelter in the tree.

“Conifers provide a safe place for birds to rest while they visit your feeder,” Knight said. “Another plus is that if you leave the tree in your yard during the summer, it will continue to provide habitat for wildlife and improve your soil as it rots. “

In spring, the tree will have lost its needles. At this point, you can cut the branches and add them to your garden, then lay the trunk of the tree in the ground but not on top of the flowers.

Leaving a tree in the yard can provide important habitat for bird populations during the winter months, especially on cold nights and during storms.

Branches and trunk provide habitat, shelter wildflowers, retain moisture, and improve soil. Frogs can seek refuge under the log, and insects, such as carpenter bees, can burrow into the wood.

“In the fall, the branches and trunk will start to decompose and turn into soil,” Knight said. “Many of our Christmas trees, especially spruce and balsam fir, have very low rot resistance and decay quickly when exposed to the elements. The more the cut branches and the trunk are in contact with the ground, the more quickly they will decompose. Drilling holes in the trunk of the tree will speed up this process. “


Comments are closed.