Quebec Government – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 22:08:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec Government – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 Quebec has more nurses than ever, more private nurses https://celenire.com/quebec-has-more-nurses-than-ever-more-private-nurses/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 22:08:25 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-has-more-nurses-than-ever-more-private-nurses/ The number of nurses in Quebec has increased again over the past year, the Order of Nurses of Quebec confirmed on Tuesday. The OIIQ also notes an increase in the number of nurses in the private sector. According to the annual statistics of the OIIQ which have just been published, 82,271 nurses were registered with […]]]>

The number of nurses in Quebec has increased again over the past year, the Order of Nurses of Quebec confirmed on Tuesday. The OIIQ also notes an increase in the number of nurses in the private sector.

According to the annual statistics of the OIIQ which have just been published, 82,271 nurses were registered with the order as of March 31, 2022.

This represents a 1.5% increase in the number of nurses employed over the previous year.

“We have never had so many in Quebec. For 10 years, it has been on the increase,” declared the president of the OIIQ, Luc Mathieu, during his general meeting and convention.

However, many observers speak of a “shortage” of nurses.

“We know that there are shortages in the network. But is there really a shortage, in number? People in the profession say “we don’t think so”. We must first optimize the contribution of everyone,” Mathieu said.

IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR

The order also notes an increase in the private sector nursing workforce since the start of the pandemic.

“The retention of the more than 63,000 nurses in the health and social services network remains an issue, even if these figures are similar to those of the previous year. Thus, the trend started at the beginning of the pandemic continues with an increase in the private sector. workforce, without a massive outflow from the public sector,” the report says.

The OIIQ specifies that 2,400 nurses work mainly for a placement agency. This is an increase of approximately 19% over the previous year.

“There is an urgent need for action that will ensure the retention of existing nurses and the next generation of nurses,” the order concludes.

MORE FULL-TIME NURSES

Also, more nurses are working full time. The ordinance even speaks of an “unprecedented number” of full-time members, at 68.4%, an increase of 4%.

And for the first time, more than half of the nurses who entered the profession were working full time, or 51.1%.

“Both are the largest increases in at least 20 years,” the order says.

These increases are partly attributable to government decrees and incentives to deal with the health emergency,” the OIIQ specified.

Faced with a shortage of health care workers because of COVID-19, Quebec has indeed offered a range of bonuses to nurses to encourage them to work full time.

The OIIQ also recalls that during the 2021-2022 fiscal year, it issued 3,565 permits to practice, which corresponds to the average of the last 10 years.

Of this number, 24%, or 842 people, were graduates from outside Quebec.


This report from The Canadian Press was first published in French on November 22, 2022.

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Quebec launches a screen break campaign | CTV News https://celenire.com/quebec-launches-a-screen-break-campaign-ctv-news/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 18:30:53 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-launches-a-screen-break-campaign-ctv-news/ Quebecers are invited to put away their cell phones, tablets and other screens on Sunday to participate in the 24 hour break for disconnection. The objective, for this fourth year, is to become aware of the place that screens take in our lives and to rebalance our digital habits. Young people aged 16 to 29 […]]]>

Quebecers are invited to put away their cell phones, tablets and other screens on Sunday to participate in the 24 hour break for disconnection.

The objective, for this fourth year, is to become aware of the place that screens take in our lives and to rebalance our digital habits.

Young people aged 16 to 29 are particularly concerned and a competition with a $1,000 scholarship is offered.

They can choose to go 24 hours without screens for leisure or only without social networks, video games or streaming.

Pause’s youth coordinator, Carolanne Campeau, explains that the purpose of the project is to prevent the risks associated with hyperconnectivity.

“We can see it as a social context we live in that pushes us to connect more, as much as possible, at all times,” she said. “And that has its benefits, but also its risks and possible negative impacts.”

Consequences of hyperconnectivity include vision problems, postural pain, a sedentary lifestyle, and excess weight.

“But the psychological aspect, I think, is what is very present in young people,” said Campeau, who is also a lecturer at the University of Sherbrooke.

For example, a person may have to compare themselves through the use of social networks, which can have an impact on their psychological health, especially with stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms.

According to a Léger survey of 752 Quebecers aged 18 to 24, 89% of respondents would like to reduce the time they spend on the Internet.

“They themselves see the impact on their physical and psychological health, as well as on their performance in school and the quality of their sleep,” Campeau said.

Additionally, nearly two-thirds of survey respondents say they log in automatically.

“It’s no coincidence,” the coordinator said. “There are people behind the screens, developers, who study human behavior and make sure that we develop this kind of reflex. The time we spend online is money for them.”

According to a study by the Direction régionale de la santé publique de Montréal in 2019, using screens for more than four hours a day for leisure is associated with higher levels of psychological distress, poorer physical health, sleep disturbances as well as higher levels of dissatisfaction in several areas of life, such as relationships and finances.

The purpose of the 24-hour break is to regain control of screen use.

“We only have 24 hours in a day, so if we spend most of that time on screen activities, we end up displacing other types of interests or passions that we might have,” said Campeau.

On Sundays, she suggests planning an activity, something you haven’t done in a while, like a hike or a board game night.

“It’s about trying to see what we’ve put aside that we can put back into our lives,” she said.

Anyone can sign up for the 24-hour screen-free challenge on the pausetonecran.com site, an initiative of the social organization Capsana, funded by the Quebec government.

The website also has resources for parents on hyperconnectivity.


This report from The Canadian Press was first published in French on November 19, 2022.

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Quebec unions and the struggle of Ontario education workers: How bureaucracy sows disunity https://celenire.com/quebec-unions-and-the-struggle-of-ontario-education-workers-how-bureaucracy-sows-disunity/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 03:10:34 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-unions-and-the-struggle-of-ontario-education-workers-how-bureaucracy-sows-disunity/ Fifty-five thousand school support workers in Ontario defied an anti-wildcat strike bill imposed by the provincial Progressive Conservative government led by Doug Ford on November 4-7. Using the anti-democratic “notwithstanding clause” which allows governments to violate rights “guaranteed” by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Ford deprived support workers of their right to strike […]]]>

Fifty-five thousand school support workers in Ontario defied an anti-wildcat strike bill imposed by the provincial Progressive Conservative government led by Doug Ford on November 4-7. Using the anti-democratic “notwithstanding clause” which allows governments to violate rights “guaranteed” by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Ford deprived support workers of their right to strike and imposed by government decree ” collective agreements” which included massive wage cuts in real terms and other concessions.

The courageous stand taken by Ontario support workers shows the way forward for workers across Canada who are facing the same attacks from big business and government on their wages, their working conditions, their right to collective struggle and public services. The support workers’ defiance galvanized mass support from the working class in Ontario and beyond, sparking a nascent movement for a province-wide general strike.

Ontario education workers rally outside the Ontario Legislature on November 4th. [Photo: WSWS]

It is precisely to avoid such a scenario, which would have threatened the very survival of Ford’s far-right government, that the senior leaders of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), the Canadian Labor Congress (CLC), Unifor, the Ontario Federation of Labor and construction unions began secret talks with the government to quickly end what they called a “political protest”. In exchange, Ford agreed to drop its use of the notwithstanding clause and repeal its draconian anti-strike legislation, Bill 28.

By ordering support workers to end their strike, without even bothering to consult with the rank and file, the union bureaucracy threw Ford a lifeline, quelling the growing rebellion among Ontario workers, including among dozens of thousands of teachers angered by their unions’ insistence that they take no “illegal” professional action.

However, the outcome of the education workers’ struggle is far from certain. By defying the strike ban despite possible fines of $4,000 per strike day, support workers took a stand for the entire working class. These janitors, teacher’s aides, early childhood educators, school bus drivers, librarians and administrative workers earn an average of less than $39,000 a year. They face an increasing workload due to decades of education cuts and the Ontario government’s disastrous response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which, like everywhere else in Canada, has taken profits before life.

This deterioration in social conditions, compounded by runaway inflation of around 7% (and much higher for basic necessities), is repeated across the country and in all sectors of the economy. This includes Quebec, the second most populous province after and adjacent to Ontario. A unified struggle of English-speaking workers in Ontario and French-speaking workers in Quebec, based on their common class interests and overcoming artificial linguistic divisions, would have a powerful impact across the country.

Any prospect of such class solidarity is viscerally opposed by the union apparatuses, both in Quebec and in English Canada. The unions thus continue the role they have played for decades in isolating and sabotaging workers’ struggles, especially when they pose a potential challenge to the existing capitalist political and social order.

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Advocates launch pan-Quebec tour to demand more social housing – Montreal https://celenire.com/advocates-launch-pan-quebec-tour-to-demand-more-social-housing-montreal/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 23:31:27 +0000 https://celenire.com/advocates-launch-pan-quebec-tour-to-demand-more-social-housing-montreal/ For some protesters gathered outside Premier Francois Legault’s office on Sunday, Quebec’s plan to distribute up to $600 to households this fall won’t help some people pay their rent. “A check might help people not go to the food bank for a week or a month, but after that they’re still in a place that […]]]>

For some protesters gathered outside Premier Francois Legault’s office on Sunday, Quebec’s plan to distribute up to $600 to households this fall won’t help some people pay their rent.

“A check might help people not go to the food bank for a week or a month, but after that they’re still in a place that they can’t afford to pay,” said pleaded Véronique Laflamme, spokesperson for the group for the right to housing, Popular Action Front in Urban Redevelopment (FRAPRU).

Read more:

Social housing advocates call on the Quebec government to do more

The money, which the government says will help Quebecers ease the burden of inflation, will cost the province more than $3 million, money that protesters say could be invested in social housing.

Although the province has made promises in recent months to invest in social housing, protesters argue more is needed and say the government should get involved now.

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“Namely to build at least 50,000 (social housing) over the next five years,” said Amy Darwish of the Parc Extension Action Committee (CAPE), another housing rights group.

They and others at the protest want the government to make that commitment in its mini-budget, due this fall.

Because, as the demonstrators point out, many people have been waiting too long for social housing.

“There have been a number of buildings that have been acquired for social housing, but no project can be developed because the Legault government simply will not invest in social housing,” Darwish told Global News. .

Read more:

Transports Quebec cancels its plan to evict a homeless camp under the Ville-Marie highway

Housing advocates have long criticized the provincial government for the number of such projects.

According to them, the province has not invested enough money in the AccèsLogis program, which pools public, private and community resources to build social and affordable housing.

“This program needs to be improved,” insisted Laflamme.

Tenants at the protest said the situation was urgent.

“Many of us are paying over 30% of our income to rent, living in abject poverty,” Nicholas Harvest pointed out, “because we have to pay for a place to live.”

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To help drive home this point to the government, some of the protesters will be traveling around the province with a tank built as a house.

The plan is to park it in front of the Quebec Legislative Assembly in mid-February, before the full provincial budget is presented.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Federal Government Opens Francophone Immigration Center in Dieppe, New Brunswick – New Brunswick https://celenire.com/federal-government-opens-francophone-immigration-center-in-dieppe-new-brunswick-new-brunswick/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 22:27:14 +0000 https://celenire.com/federal-government-opens-francophone-immigration-center-in-dieppe-new-brunswick-new-brunswick/ The federal government opened a national center in Dieppe, New Brunswick, on Wednesday with the aim of increasing Francophone immigration. The federal center will conduct studies and encourage efforts to attract French-speaking immigrants to communities like Moncton that need a bilingual workforce. “It is also an important way to ensure that the demographic importance of […]]]>

The federal government opened a national center in Dieppe, New Brunswick, on Wednesday with the aim of increasing Francophone immigration.

The federal center will conduct studies and encourage efforts to attract French-speaking immigrants to communities like Moncton that need a bilingual workforce.

“It is also an important way to ensure that the demographic importance of New Brunswick’s Francophone community is not diluted by our collective effort to bring more new Canadians to our beautiful province,” said the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities, Dominic LeBlanc, at a press conference. conference Thursday.

The center will employ about 30 full-time employees at the Dieppe office.

The federal government hopes to reach a target of 4.4% Francophone immigration outside Quebec by 2023.

Read more:

The proportion of Francophones is decreasing in Quebec and almost everywhere in Canada

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Minister of Official Languages ​​and Member of Parliament for Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe, Ginette Petitpas-Taylor, told the crowd in French that: “The past few weeks have reminded us of how official languages ​​and the preservation of our beautiful French language is a constant battle.

She was referring to recent controversies surrounding bilingualism in New Brunswick, such as Premier Blaine Higgs’ decision to add Kris Austin to a committee that will review the province’s Official Languages ​​Act.

Read more:

Trudeau criticizes NB Premier Higgs for appointing Kris Austin to bilingualism committee

Liberal MPs Rob McKee, who represents Moncton Centre, and Robert Gauvin, who represents Shediac Bay-Dieppe, were the only provincial representatives who attended the announcement.

SANB President Alexandre Cédric Doucet said he was disturbed by the absence of provincial ministers during the announcement.

“That’s the question on everyone’s lips today, and I think it’s very, very unfortunate that the province isn’t here today,” he said during a meeting.

Gauvin, who is a former PC MP who crossed the floor in 2020, said the absence of provincial ministers sent a clear message.

“That says a lot, doesn’t it? Immigration is important to New Brunswick as we evolve as a province and as a country. The signal sent by the absence says that Francophone immigration is not important,” he said.

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Click to play the video: “New Brunswick premier delays response to language law improvements”


NB Premier Delays Response to Language Law Improvements


© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Quebec union leaders to speak at Queen’s Park rally, showing solidarity with CUPE education workers in fight against Bill 28 https://celenire.com/quebec-union-leaders-to-speak-at-queens-park-rally-showing-solidarity-with-cupe-education-workers-in-fight-against-bill-28/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 23:42:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-union-leaders-to-speak-at-queens-park-rally-showing-solidarity-with-cupe-education-workers-in-fight-against-bill-28/ TORONTO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–For the first time in 50 years of history, the Common Front of Quebec supported union actions outside the province. CUPE Quebec union leaders will be at Queen’s Park to protest the Ford government’s Bill 28 and to show their solidarity with frontline education workers. CUPE Ontario education workers launched a labor action to […]]]>

TORONTO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–For the first time in 50 years of history, the Common Front of Quebec supported union actions outside the province. CUPE Quebec union leaders will be at Queen’s Park to protest the Ford government’s Bill 28 and to show their solidarity with frontline education workers.

CUPE Ontario education workers launched a labor action to protest Bill 28 on November 4 and more than 10,000 people took their message to Queen’s Park. The Common Front represents 420,000 members. Their solidarity is added to the messages of unity already expressed by the Quebec labor movement, in particular the open letters of support from the Union of Professional Education Staff of Chaudière-Appalaches, Union of Teachers of the Laurentians, Union of Saguenay education, Outaouais school support union, Côte-du-Sud education union, Federation of collective action unions, Trois-Lacs support staff union, Union of education in Bas-Richelieu, Alliance of Family Workers, Union of School Support Staff of Jonquière and Centrale des Syndicats du Québec.

WHAT:

CUPE Quebec union leaders to join political protest at Queen’s Park in response to Bill 28

WHO:

Patrick Gloutney, President CUPE Quebec

Frédéric Brisson, General Secretary CUPE Quebec

Richard Delisle, President of the Education Sector, CUPE Quebec

Benoit Cowell, president, paramedics, CUPE Quebec

Jocelyn Bourdon, president of the municipal sector, CUPE Quebec

Maxime Ste-Marie, president of the health sector, CUPE Quebec

Tulsa Valin Landry, President of the Communications Sector, CUPE Quebec

WHEN:

Monday, November 7 – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE:

In front of Queen’s Park

The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) is Canada‘s largest union, with 715,000 members across the country. CUPE represents workers in health care, emergency services, education, early learning and child care, municipalities, social services, libraries, utilities, transportation, airlines, etc.

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Québec solidaire will take an oath to the king and undertakes to introduce a bill to make the pledge optional https://celenire.com/quebec-solidaire-will-take-an-oath-to-the-king-and-undertakes-to-introduce-a-bill-to-make-the-pledge-optional/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 15:00:14 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-solidaire-will-take-an-oath-to-the-king-and-undertakes-to-introduce-a-bill-to-make-the-pledge-optional/ MONTREAL — The 11 recently elected deputies of Québec solidaire are no longer refusing to take the oath to King Charles III. MONTREAL — The 11 recently elected deputies of Québec solidaire are no longer refusing to take the oath to King Charles III. Spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois says party members will be sworn in so […]]]>

MONTREAL — The 11 recently elected deputies of Québec solidaire are no longer refusing to take the oath to King Charles III.

MONTREAL — The 11 recently elected deputies of Québec solidaire are no longer refusing to take the oath to King Charles III.

Spokesperson Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois says party members will be sworn in so they can enter the Legislative Assembly and quickly table a bill to make the pledge optional.

Quebec solidaire’s U-turn follows a decision earlier this week by the Speaker of the Legislature, who declared the Oath to the King mandatory and authorized the Sergeant-at-Arms to expel members who do not comply. not.

Nadeau-Dubois’ decision isolates the three recently elected deputies of the Parti Québécois, who continue to refuse to take the oath to the King.

Nadeau-Dubois says the Speaker’s decision is disappointing, but the Quebec solidaire spokesperson says that to pass a law making the oath optional, his party must sit in the Legislative Assembly.

Coalition Avenir Québec parliamentary leader Simon Jolin-Barrette said the government was ready to move quickly to make the oath optional.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on November 3, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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Hydro-Québec launches Cleo, a provider of fleet charging solutions https://celenire.com/hydro-quebec-launches-cleo-a-provider-of-fleet-charging-solutions/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 14:36:15 +0000 https://celenire.com/hydro-quebec-launches-cleo-a-provider-of-fleet-charging-solutions/ Citing growing demand for its fleet charging solutions, Hydro-Québec has created the new dedicated subsidiary to more efficiently offer its services and support its customers Commercial fleet operators in Quebec have a new ally in the transition to electric vehicles: Hydro-Quebec now offers a brand dedicated to large-scale charging solutions, Cleo. The new utility subsidiary […]]]>

Citing growing demand for its fleet charging solutions, Hydro-Québec has created the new dedicated subsidiary to more efficiently offer its services and support its customers

Commercial fleet operators in Quebec have a new ally in the transition to electric vehicles: Hydro-Quebec now offers a brand dedicated to large-scale charging solutions, Cleo.

The new utility subsidiary offers commercial customers turnkey, vendor-neutral charging solutions for the province’s light, medium and heavy-duty fleets.

Hydro-Quebec actually started offering charging solutions for the province’s fleets earlier this year. Widespread interest and adoption of the solution led to the creation of Cleo.

“Hydro-Québec fully assumes its responsibility and its essential role in the transition to a low-carbon economy and seeks to act as a catalyst to achieve government transportation electrification targets,” said Jeff Desruisseaux, President and Chief Executive Officer. of Cleo, in a press release.

“The market response since the launch of our charging solutions has been so positive that it made perfect sense to create a brand to reflect the growing importance of our services within the ecosystem.”

In addition to offering support and maintenance of the charging infrastructure through a standard turnkey charging service, Cleo also uses and offers an intelligent platform that “automatically manages the charging of vehicles by anticipating their energy needs”, reads -on in the press release.

Cleo in use

Now that there is an official brand dedicated to commercial fleet charging solutions, Cleo inherits customers like First Student (the largest student transportation provider in North America), Autobus Groupe Séguin in Laval and Groupe Autocar Jeannois in Alma.

These last two companies have been using Hydro-Québec (now Cleo) charging solutions since 2021 and 2022, respectively.

For First Student – ​​which is the parent company of Transco in Quebec – Cleo will be responsible for setting up a charging platform to support 200 electric school buses by the end of this year.

“With the rollout, we intend to reduce our demand on the network and more efficiently manage the charging of our electric school buses,” said Laurie Henner, zone general manager at First Student in a press release. “We chose Cleo for its expertise and agnostic approach.”

General categories for which Cleo will offer charging solutions will include: school transportation, mass transit, package delivery, utilities, freight transportation and municipal services.

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Gatineau residents will benefit from improved urban parks thanks to support from the Government of Canada https://celenire.com/gatineau-residents-will-benefit-from-improved-urban-parks-thanks-to-support-from-the-government-of-canada/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/gatineau-residents-will-benefit-from-improved-urban-parks-thanks-to-support-from-the-government-of-canada/ CED grants $130,500 to the Outaouais Regional Council for the Environment and Sustainable Development (CREDDO) for planting trees in Gatineau’s urban parks. GATINEAU, QC, October 27, 2022 /CNW Telbec/ – Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) Shared public spaces such as parks are at the heart of our communities. They are important for residents […]]]>

CED grants $130,500 to the Outaouais Regional Council for the Environment and Sustainable Development (CREDDO) for planting trees in Gatineau’s urban parks.

GATINEAU, QC, October 27, 2022 /CNW Telbec/ – Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED)

Shared public spaces such as parks are at the heart of our communities. They are important for residents and visitors, as well as for businesses that contribute to the vitality of our regions. The pandemic is leading us to rethink the organization of our public spaces and the Government of Canada has a strategic vision to create living environments where everyone can flourish.

Today, Greg FergusMember of Parliament for Hull–Aylmer and Parliamentary Secretary to the Premier and President of the Treasury Board, on behalf of the Honorable Pascale St–Onge, Minister of Sports and Minister responsible for CED, announced a non-repayable contribution of $130.500 for CREDDO, provided through the Canadian Community Revitalization Fund (CRFC). The funding will be used to purchase and plant 300 trees in Gatineau’s urban parks.

In operation since 1990, CREDDO is one of 16 regional environmental councils in the regions of Quebec. Its primary mandate is to ensure consultation among Outaouais stakeholders on the region’s environmental issues. CED funding will be used to enhance urban parks to revitalize main streets and downtown areas; enhance outdoor spaces; and support green projects like the one in the City of Gatineau. The project is part of “Vivre en vert” [living in green] campaign whose goal is to prioritize the greening of vulnerable communities Gatineau to address the problem of urban heat islands.

The government of Canada recognizes that community spaces promote social interaction and physical activity. By providing better access to recreational programs and facilities, we contribute to the well-being of communities, families and individuals across the country. Our economic recovery is closely linked to the vitality of our local communities and their shared spaces.

Quotation

“We are committed to regional development, which is why we support promising community initiatives. Thanks to the CREDDO project, the addition of trees in city parks will not only restore green spaces, but also provide a better living environment for Gatineau residents. and help promote community life. This federal funding is excellent news for the City of Gatineau.

Greg FergusMNA for Hull–Aylmer and Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the President of the Treasury Board

“Our funding of projects like CREDDO reflects our government’s strategic vision and commitment to supporting of Quebec communities. Hats off to the entire CREDDO team for this initiative, which both reduces greenhouse gases and creates pleasant shared spaces for Gatineau residents!”

The Honorable Pascale St.–Onge, MNA for Brome–Missisquoi, Minister of Sports and Minister responsible for CED

“In addition to their ecological, social and economic benefits, trees are an important natural infrastructure for combating and adapting to climate change. This funding is great news as the City of Gatineau’s new urban forestry plan aims to improve the city’s canopy index. I would like to thank the government for Canada and all the partners, and I assure you that I intend to collaborate fully in the deployment of this initiative.”

France Bélisle, Mayor of Gatineau

“For several years, CREDDO has been working with local stakeholders to green Gatineau’s most vulnerable communities. Through this new project, we are proud to partner with the City of Gatineau, with the support of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions. — increase the tree cover of our urban green spaces in order to improve citizens’ quality of life. Parks will play a key role in the resilience of our communities, which is why we need to start improving them now.

Benoît Delage, Managing Director, CREDDO

Fast facts

  • The CCRF was launched in June 2021. A total of $500 million was granted over two years to from Canada regional development agencies (RDAs), including $107 million for CED to invest in shared and inclusive public spaces in Quebec. As public health restrictions ease, the government of Canada remains committed to investing in shared spaces to make them safer, greener and more accessible. This will stimulate local economies, create jobs and improve the quality of life for Canadians. This funding helps communities:
    • adapt community spaces and assets so that they can be used safely in accordance with local public health guidelines; and
    • build or improve community spaces to encourage Canadians to re-engage and explore their communities and regions.
  • The CRFC is deployed as part of CED’s Quebec Economic Development Program (PDEQ).
  • CED is a key federal partner in of Quebec regional economic development. With its 12 business offices, CED is there to support Quebec companies, support organizations and territories in the economy of tomorrow.

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SOURCE Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

For further information: Media Relations: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, [email protected]; Ariane Joazard-Bélizaire, Press Attaché, Office of the Minister of Sports and Minister Responsible for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, [email protected]

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Legault’s dominance in Quebec is more of a compromise than a crisis https://celenire.com/legaults-dominance-in-quebec-is-more-of-a-compromise-than-a-crisis/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/legaults-dominance-in-quebec-is-more-of-a-compromise-than-a-crisis/ Some business people say they’d rather be lucky than good at what they do. In the case of newly re-elected Quebec Premier François Legault, it can sometimes be difficult to separate his strategy from his good fortune. Recognizing, as Legault did when he founded the Coalition Avenir a decade ago, that this province’s myopic nationalist […]]]>

Some business people say they’d rather be lucky than good at what they do.

In the case of newly re-elected Quebec Premier François Legault, it can sometimes be difficult to separate his strategy from his good fortune.

Recognizing, as Legault did when he founded the Coalition Avenir a decade ago, that this province’s myopic nationalist political class was on a collision course with modernity required a healthy dose of foresight. , wisdom and patience in the face of critics who predicted that his generically titled giant tent would be an uninspiring flop.

That no caquiste has well conceptualized the so-called “autonomist” model of Quebec-Canada relations, that the Legault government is deliberately overzealous in its cultural policies (laws on language and secularism 96 and 21) and that the Prime Minister reneging on a signed deal The pledge to implement his own Democracy Minister’s welcomed electoral reforms in 2019 appears to be of secondary concern to voters in times of crisis.

Legault has masterfully positioned himself as an intergenerational guardian, a father figure (as former pundit and new CAQ MP Bernard Drainville put it on election night) for nationalists as the movement has been portrayed as one that enters a phase of gerontologizationsystematizing preparations for the end of life (at least the predominant ethnocentric variety that dominated much of the Quebec political establishment in the wake of the Quiet Revolution).

As political parties around the world polarize, the CAQ offered Quebeckers a pragmatic but, for federalists, somewhat problematic constitutional compromise: withdrawing from the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on issues related to culture and the predominance of the French language. This quiet compromise between federalism and sovereignism seems to suit federal liberals, content to signal virtue over minority rights, leaving those affected by late-stage improvised nationalist policies to fend for themselves in court or descaleto leave unceremoniously to pursue opportunities in more liberal jurisdictions.

Collapse of the opposition

As controversial as he is, Legault is arguably the most successful Canadian prime minister of the current era. His domination of Quebec politics, however, is due to the confluence of a few factors, some of which are beyond his control.

Today’s CAQ is the second iteration, the first being a broader and more centrist coalition of federalists, soft nationalists without commitment and a few disgruntled sovereignists; it was trying to be too much and didn’t work, ending in two consecutive third-place finishes for Legault. The Liberals remained the uncontested option for the Federalists, and the CAQ struggled to find its footing until 2015, when it turned to the nationalist centre-right of the political spectrum in a successful attempt to siphon off Parti Québécois voters instead.

Legault’s re-engagement with the ethnocentric policies he had previously abandoned with the PQ has alienated a minority of federalist-leaning CAQs, including the party’s founding president and current Liberal opposition leader Dominique Anglade, who resigned in 2018. citing concerns about Legault’s increasingly “radical” discourse on Identity and Immigration. Yet she didn’t share much about previously expressed concerns about the CAQ’s ethnocentric pivot. Being vague about liberal values ​​was a strategic mistake and part of a failed attempt by liberals to appeal to an overserved nationalist demographic.

In the months leading up to the election, Anglade went so far as to side with Prime Minister Legault and the sovereignist Bloc Québécois in demanding the federal government reverses the decision of the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, allowing Quebec to retain a disproportionate number of seats in Parliament. Equally eager to appease the nationalists, regardless of the corrosive effect on democracy, the federal Liberals joined their provincial counterparts in agreeing to this and other illiberal compromises.

Anglade and his strategists have succumbed to a popular nationalist media narrative that positions Quebecers as clear supporters of ethnocentric policies when even the most favorable polls on these issues do not convincingly support the thesis.

Despite the nudge from flattering nationalist pundits, Legault also went virtually unchallenged by the second and third opposition leaders, both sovereignists whose policies are simply too radical for mainstream voters.

Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, a prominent figure in the province’s historic student protests in 2012 and now co-spokesperson for Québec solidaire, has pledged to spend more than half a billion dollars exploring sovereignty, even though a majority of his own polled supporters rejected the idea.

Even more inexplicable praise went to another struggling sovereigntist revolutionary, PQ leader Paul St. Pierre Plamondon, who finished fourth; this included a victory in his own constituency, made possible when his QS opponent withdrew, filmed removing PQ flyers from the mailbox of an east Montreal resident.

Media praise including Nadeau-Dubois and Saint-Pierre Plamondon, the idealistic, youthful and well-marked sovereignists of the next generation, continues to be out of step with the opinions of Quebec voters who granted them eleven and three seats respectively; only about 1.2 million Quebecers can bear to vote for a sovereignist party.

Experts have described them as the most motivated candidates, but for progressive, cosmopolitan and anti-racist Quebecers, it must be increasingly difficult to generate enthusiasm for sovereignist ideologues who, for example, casually utter the word N on television during an official election debate.

This period of reflection and realignment of Quebec politics will raise important questions about the merits of ethnocentric nationalism, including: Are we this different from other Canadians, as Vallières and his descendants suggest? The continued unpopularity of sovereigntist parties despite the amplification of nationalist media suggests that the issue is almost settled.

Democratic détente or crisis?

Although Legault’s lopsided victory was made all the easier due to the incompetence of the opposition, the fact of the result – 90 seats for the CAQ against 35 for the opposition parties – led to numerous calls from all political backgrounds to implement a Mixed Member Proportional model in time for the next election.

A Radio-Canada simulation based on the latest electoral reform proposal crafted by the Quebec government during the CAQ’s first term shows that Legault would still have won a majority, albeit less convincingly.

“François Legault received three times more votes than his nearest rival and it is a scandal that he governs by majority”, observed the nationalist pundit Mario Dumont, himself a victim of the Westminster model as a former leader of a defunct startup party. After nearly two decades, the Action Démocratique (ADQ) was absorbed by the CAQ; it peaked as official opposition in 2007, and Dumont turned to punditry soon after. “I dare to imagine how those speaking out have managed to get a good night’s sleep since Erin O’Toole was thrown back into opposition with one percent more votes than Justin Trudeau!”

The only leader who could claim a semi-legitimate Democratic grievance could ironically be populist Éric Duhaime, leader of the Conservative Party of Quebec, who received around 100,000 votes less than QS but could not win a single seat.

There is something to be said about the threshold of legitimacy imposed on political parties by the system, however obsolete it may be. A former radio talk show host and strategist for the defunct ADQ, Duhaime’s irresponsible courting of the skeptical vaccine vote and fearmongering over pandemic restrictions lifted months ago are markers of the kind of populist movement potentially subversive as the most ardent supporters of the system would say, for the sake of national stability, must be kept out of government.

What is the problem?

Legault is a pragmatist and negotiator who co-founded Air Transat from the ashes of a former regional carrier – it’s safe to assume that much about his successful middle ground has yet to be revealed.

The CAQ has benefited from an agreement, verbal or not, with Ottawa on the rights of minorities in Quebec.

Given that it is led by a liberal named Trudeau, the lack of formal resistance to the CAQ’s separatist agenda by the federal government has come as a surprise to say the least to disillusioned Quebec liberals and a plethora of minority groups. How long will the federal government tolerate violations of minority rights?

Quebec’s shifting demographics—mostly left-leaning millennials and younger cohorts overwhelmingly rejecting ethnocentric nationalism—make this province one of the most progressive, tolerant, and, as Legault fears, “awakened” societies in North America. . In the meantime, uncomfortable compromises are being made to ease a transition away from baby boomer identity politics.

There is something about the current era of Quebec-Canada relations that seems inevitably designed – by pollsters, pundits and consultants – to foment apathy among federalists and sovereignists, to avoid difficult conversations about the of Quebecers and Canadians on human rights, and how these shared values ​​should be expressed in the Constitution.

Once their time in politics is over, perhaps Legault and Trudeau will argue that the compromise was a necessary transitional period for Quebec; others would counter that the demographic shift away from nationalism is already irreversible and that these leaders lack the courage to recognize a new reality.

What seems indisputable is that Legault’s compromise is what Quebecers find acceptable at the moment, given the choices available to them. His victory was not aided by voter suppression techniques, there is no evidence of widespread corruption in government, and his four opponents received significant, if not disproportionate, media attention.

It was as fair a fight as the system allows under the circumstances, and as traditional political movements struggle to find relevance in increasingly polarized environments, the challenge for opposition forces in Quebec will be to look beyond beyond this transitional time to engage new voters with bold and pragmatic strategies. ideas. They will have to, as Legault says with a phrase that resonated, look away from the old bafflesthe old constitutional disputes that neither contemporary nationalist nor federalist leaders have the ability to resolve.

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