Quebec Government – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 17:53:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec Government – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 Josh Freed: Florida feels like another planet compared to Quebec https://celenire.com/josh-freed-florida-feels-like-another-planet-compared-to-quebec/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 11:02:14 +0000 https://celenire.com/josh-freed-florida-feels-like-another-planet-compared-to-quebec/ Breadcrumb Links Local News During my visit, I saw customers shaking hands with their server, as if to say, “Thank you, I’ll have some sprouts for dessert,” writes Josh Freed. Author of the article: Josh freed • Montreal Gazette Special Publication date : January 22, 2022 • 14 hours ago • 4 minute read • […]]]>

During my visit, I saw customers shaking hands with their server, as if to say, “Thank you, I’ll have some sprouts for dessert,” writes Josh Freed.

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I have a confession to make: I recently fled Quebec for a week, a refugee from Legault’s 2.0 curfew and lockdown rules.

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A friend told me about an available condo in Florida, my wife and I made a last second decision to get away briefly and work remotely. But the second we landed, we felt like we had arrived on another planet.

While Quebec is in total lockdown mode, Florida is Cowboyland, where you barely know COVID is happening, despite rates of new cases and hospitalizations much higher than ours.

It’s madness by Canadian standards, but an eye-opening experience. For starters, everyone is out, filling bars, restaurants, movies, gyms and crowded sports arenas.

Stores and supermarkets do not require masks, but some cashiers and customers wear them, although often under the nose or chin – Florida style. It seems a way of announcing: “Look, I’m masked!” when they are not.

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The restaurants are fully open and looking at some they are packed. Servers can choose to wear masks, and at least half don’t.

In the ever-friendly America, some customers even shake hands with their waiters before leaving, to say, “Thanks, I’ll have some sprouts for dessert.”

It’s easy to spot Canadians in restaurants, as we’re the ones wearing proper masks and sitting nervously on the patio, even in the rain.

You can also see the difference in the media. In Quebec, COVID completely dominates the news, because almost nothing else is happening.

In Florida, it’s the other way around.

I recently checked out the prestigious Miami Herald on a day when Florida had more than 70,000 daily new cases — nearly twice as many per capita as Quebec, and so did their hospitalizations.

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But the first mention of COVID anywhere in the newspaper was exactly 18 stories down, with the headline: “Amid Omicron surge, hospitals stretched. What can Florida lawmakers do?

Ignore it, as always, I guess. Meanwhile, the 19th story was: “Florida COVID update: 71,742 new cases as hospitalized patients increase.”

Among the many stories played much higher were: “Miami Marlins appoint minor league affiliate managers” and “Microbial contamination in laxatives may cause ‘life-threatening’ infection.”

But it still beats NBC TV’s Florida website that day, which aired this story long before COVID: “Cop kills dog in Miami-Dade after barking complaint.”

It’s hard to invent such things. Meanwhile, in La Presse on the same day, the top six stories were about COVID.

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By any measure, life in Florida seems surreal, as if everyone is wearing blinders and trying not to notice a disease that has killed more than 63,000 Floridians. That’s about twice as many deaths as in all of Canada, in a state that has two-thirds of our country’s population.

It’s madness for health, but there’s a psychological benefit, because COVID doesn’t dominate all of life like here. We Montrealers live in a tense and depressing pandemic bubble – fully COVID, all the time – which is why many people avoid following the news.

In Florida, entire conversations go on without the C-word being mentioned unless you bring it up – which of course I did. I asked a group of seven in their 60s I met on a restaurant patio what they thought of Florida’s non-existent pandemic rules.

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All said they liked the way Florida handles things. In the words of one woman “Our philosophy here is: I take care of myself and you take care of yourself. If you want to wear a mask indoors, you should. If you don’t want to go to a restaurant, you shouldn’t.

When I asked about our collective responsibility to protect others, she shrugged and said, “That’s just not what we think here.”

I mentioned the recent curfew in Quebec, but they all just laughed, dismissing it as “Canadian Communism”. Many others obviously agree because more people have moved to Florida during the pandemic than to any other state.

Thousands of Quebecers have also considered settling there since the pandemic.

It’s a story of two worlds. Like most Canadians, I always believe that collective security trumps certain individual rights. But I would prefer something between the cowboy individualism of Florida and the authoritarian paternalistic rules of Quebec during this fifth wave.

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Our curfew has been lifted, but we still cannot legally invite anyone to our home, while other Western countries and Canadian provinces allow five to 20 guests.

Britain, France, Spain and other European countries begin to “live with Omicron” like the seasonal flu, and abandon many emergency measures. Ontario plans to do the same. When, if ever, Quebec?

To get home, we needed a COVID PCR test, almost impossible to find in Montreal, with hour-long queues at most hospitals. Therefore, the Quebec government will not allow anyone other than very sick people to take them, while travelers have to go to private clinics and pay maybe $200.

Meanwhile, every pharmacy in Florida is running free PCR tests, even for traveling strangers. That seems odd in a country without universal health insurance, where people are often ruined by medical bills.

But when we went for our free test at a pharmacy, there were about ten people waiting, all wearing masks, the only place I had seen that all week.

For the first time, we felt a bit like home.

joshfreed49@gmail.com

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COVID-19 in Saskatchewan: a doctor denounces the Quebec comparison of Moe https://celenire.com/covid-19-in-saskatchewan-a-doctor-denounces-the-quebec-comparison-of-moe/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 00:48:40 +0000 https://celenire.com/covid-19-in-saskatchewan-a-doctor-denounces-the-quebec-comparison-of-moe/ The Omicron COVID-19 variant has spread rapidly, but Saskatchewan hospitals have yet to feel its full effects. Over the past two weeks, cases in hospital and intensive care have nearly doubled, with the province reporting 1,000 cases almost every day. Cory Neudorf, acting chief medical officer of the Saskatchewan Health Authority, says those numbers will […]]]>

The Omicron COVID-19 variant has spread rapidly, but Saskatchewan hospitals have yet to feel its full effects.

Over the past two weeks, cases in hospital and intensive care have nearly doubled, with the province reporting 1,000 cases almost every day.

Cory Neudorf, acting chief medical officer of the Saskatchewan Health Authority, says those numbers will continue to rise.

“We haven’t seen the impact of these 1,000+ cases per day on the system,” Neudorf said.

“Hospitalizations tend to delay cases by about two weeks, then ICU admissions delay cases by a week or two.”

Neudorf says the province could eventually lean on other provinces for help, as it did during the Delta wave.

“It seems to be so. There is a certain inevitability to this growing pressure that is going to come.

According to Neudorf, Omicron is less severe than the Delta variant but spreads faster. From the information, it has been provided that it attacks people’s nose and throat and the first part of the bronchi. It is less likely than Delta to cause pneumonia.

Neudorf says health experts are always learning more about Omicron, and some people who get it might have a different experience. He notes that the further down a person’s system the virus is, the worse it is for their body. It hits the unvaccinated hardest.

Neudorf says the province should consider putting in place gathering size limits or canceling large events.

In a press release, Premier Scott Moe said new restrictions would not be implemented.

“Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 death rate in January is the lowest of any province and 90% lower than the national rate of 4.8 per 100,000 population. It should be noted that Quebec, with the most severe containment measures in Canada, has the highest COVID-19 death rate in Canada in January and one of the highest current rates in the world. .”

Infectious disease physician Dr. Alexander Wong says that’s not an exact comparison.

“We’re only a few weeks behind them – of course we’re not as bad as them. We’re not in the same place as them in the Omicron wave,” he said.

In the statement, Moe said his government “sees no clear evidence that lockdown measures have reduced hospitalizations, ICU admissions and deaths in other provinces.”

“As a health care provider and as a frontline health care provider, and on behalf of many of my colleagues, it is exhausting and completely disappointing to feel that we have been let down in this way by our elected officials. “Wong said.

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Allison Hanes: As Omicron rages, we Quebecers stand alone https://celenire.com/allison-hanes-as-omicron-rages-we-quebecers-stand-alone/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 00:57:53 +0000 https://celenire.com/allison-hanes-as-omicron-rages-we-quebecers-stand-alone/ Breadcrumb Links Opinion Columnists Breaks in public services seem to be a betrayal of the sacrifices we have made. It’s as if the government is abandoning us at the worst time. Premier Francois Legault, right, was joined by Education Minister Jean-Francois Roberge, left, and acting director of public health Luc Boileau last week. Our faith […]]]>

Breaks in public services seem to be a betrayal of the sacrifices we have made. It’s as if the government is abandoning us at the worst time.

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So many times since the start of the pandemic, we have been told that “we are all in this together”.

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Nurturing social solidarity at a time of extreme isolation was crucial to Quebec’s response to the pandemic. It’s one of the reasons Quebecers were hailed for being the most compliant in North America in obeying public health guidelines during the first wave. This is why today we have one of the highest vaccination rates in the world.

We developed new behaviors like social distancing, mask-wearing, remote working and online learning, endured long months of curfews and business closures, and started carrying a digital passport. to access a growing list of locations, from the Bell Center to Costco – anything to show support for exhausted medical staff and help keep the healthcare system from collapsing.

Even when the rules regulating the minutia of our lives border on the pedantic (yes, people now allowed to visit you in your backyard can use your indoor restroom), we trusted the guidelines of the Quebec government, because that’s what he was going to do to protect us.

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Now that feeling that “it’s going to be okay” is quickly eroding. In recent weeks, systems strained by 22 months of pandemic response have reached breaking point under the force of a punitive fifth wave. The rules we relied on to guide us during this ongoing crisis have been changed. And our confidence in the government to keep Quebec functioning at the most basic level has been shaken.

It now feels very much alone as Omicron wreaks unprecedented havoc.

Official testing capability to find out if you have cratered COVID-19 just as cases spiked in December. Quebecers were asked to self-administer rapid tests sent home with school children and distributed in pharmacies. But they’re so rare it’s like Lord of the Flies is trying to get one of the precious kits.

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Quebec’s contingency plans for returning children to school may call on parents as a last resort to oversee classes if there are not enough teachers, substitutes, resource professionals or other staff available on a given day. Teachers may be required to resume their duties virtually from home even if they are sick. Classes will only move online if 60% of a class find themselves sick or isolated, leaving many students excluded from learning.

No improvements have been made to ventilation, but nearly 70% of schools have been equipped with a carbon dioxide monitor to measure air quality in classrooms.

However, sharing the data in a meaningful and transparent way was left to the entrepreneur dad who took the initiative to launch the Covid Écoles Québec website, a self-reporting site to track outbreaks in schools. He has now branched out into crowdsourcing positive rapid test results and asking teachers to send in carbon dioxide readings.

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But it’s the emergency plans for overwhelmed hospitals that really testify to the seriousness of Quebec’s predicament. With more than 3,400 patients admitted, 289 in intensive care units, 12,000 health workers sick or in isolation, surgeries are being postponed and procedures delayed. And that’s still not enough to cope with the pressure.

Quebec is now on the verge of rationing care to “do more with what it has,” said Dr. Lucie Opatrny, the province’s deputy health minister. As she said: the healthcare system will start providing B-level care to everyone, instead of A+ care to fewer people.

A new guide prepared by a committee of experts could result in: fewer and shorter hospital stays; greater use of home care and outpatient treatment; recall infected health workers earlier; possible mix between infected and non-infected patients in the department; referral to palliative care; and an invitation to family members – who have so far been excluded even from visiting hospitals – to provide basic services like bathing, feeding and emptying bedpans.

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Keeping COVID-19 out of hospitals has been futile, so we’re about to give up and mitigate the damage instead.

Quebecers tend to look to the state for solutions in good times and bad. It is a society that values ​​the common good. If the pandemic has made us more dependent on the government, this deepening crisis is now testing its ability to act.

The potential breakdowns in public services appear as a betrayal of the sacrifices made so far. It is as if we were on our own at a time of great uncertainty and anxiety.

But there is a danger for all of us that people will feel increasingly alone when it is more important than ever to do our part.

ahanes@postmedia.com

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Safety concerns abound as Quebec students return to school this week https://celenire.com/safety-concerns-abound-as-quebec-students-return-to-school-this-week/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/safety-concerns-abound-as-quebec-students-return-to-school-this-week/ After an extended holiday break and a shift to virtual learning, thousands of Quebec students are returning to class this week. But some parents and officials worry that the government has not put in place adequate COVID-19 measures to keep the community safe. Last week, the government announced it would go ahead with its plan […]]]>

After an extended holiday break and a shift to virtual learning, thousands of Quebec students are returning to class this week. But some parents and officials worry that the government has not put in place adequate COVID-19 measures to keep the community safe.

Last week, the government announced it would go ahead with its plan to reopen schools to in-person learning on Monday, despite the high infection rate of the Omicron variant. However, most schools on the island of Montreal postponed the reopening until Tuesday due to a winter storm.

The Quebec government has promised a series of measures to ensure a safe return to school, including more indoor masking and 7.2 million rapid tests deployed in elementary schools.

The province also said Friday that CO2 readers will come to classrooms across the province starting this week and will continue through February to better assess ventilation needs in Quebec schools. But some parents are not reassured.

“Here we are in the fifth wave, still no ventilation,” said Shelley Reuter, who has been sending her 11-year-old son to school wearing an N95 mask since September.

CO2 readers can help determine if a classroom is well ventilated by showing if there is too much exhaled air, which can increase the risk of spreading infection from aerosols.

Reuters said a sensor had yet to be installed in her son’s classroom and the lack of communication from the school board was concerning.

“They’re too little, too late,” she said. “I’m resigned to having COVID by the end of the week.”

Teachers demand N95 masks

For Josée Scalabrini, president of the Federation of Education Unions, which represents more than 65,000 teachers in Quebec, the government’s approach to reopening schools is inconsistent.

“We’re told we’re at a peak, that our healthcare system can’t take it anymore, but we’re getting everyone back to our schools,” Scalabrini said.

Quebec says schools are no longer required to close in the event of an epidemic, but can switch to online teaching if more than 60% of students are isolated. Teachers and unions have demanded N95 masks and better ventilation to reduce the risk of this happening.

Russell Copeman, executive director of the Quebec English School Boards Association, says a number of school boards have installed air purifiers with HEPA filters at their own expense in classrooms without mechanical ventilation.

Air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate (HEPA) filters can reduce the concentration of certain viruses in the air by capturing small particles, such as water droplets that can carry the coronavirus. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

“Air purifiers are not recommended by the Government of Quebec, nor funded by the Government of Quebec, despite the fact that Ontario has ordered 73,000 stand-alone air purifiers with HEPA filters for their classrooms,” did he declare.

Copeman says Quebec should follow Ontario’s lead in invoking the highest possible mitigation measures, including providing all school staff with N95 masks.

Public Health Director Luc Boileau said last week that N95 masks were reserved for “special schools” and were not required in all establishments.

Montreal assures parents that the school is safe

While CO2 meters can help identify air quality problems in classrooms, experts say they won’t solve them.

“You would need some kind of air filter or a device that circulates the air or a process to circulate the air in the classrooms so that the same people are not breathing the same type stagnant air for a long time,” said Dr. Christopher Labos, Montreal epidemiologist and cardiologist.

Schools with high levels of CO2 in their classrooms can request an air exchanger from the government, and officials said no request would be denied.

In conjunction with better air quality, Labos says it’s important that all teachers and students are vaccinated and that everyone wears their mask properly. Ideally, he says, teachers and students would be fitted with N95 masks.

Montreal Public Health sent a letter to parents over the weekend to reassure them that it will do everything in its power to support schools and limit the transmission of the virus.

“It must be taken into account that this variant is less virulent and that vaccination offers excellent protection against more severe forms of the disease,” said Director of Public Health Dr. Mylène Drouin, adding that the best way protecting the school community and beyond requires vaccination. .

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Massive opposition to Monday’s return to classroom learning in Ontario and Quebec https://celenire.com/massive-opposition-to-mondays-return-to-classroom-learning-in-ontario-and-quebec/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 00:41:49 +0000 https://celenire.com/massive-opposition-to-mondays-return-to-classroom-learning-in-ontario-and-quebec/ Teachers at Westmount High School in Montreal demonstrated against the Quebec government’s reckless decision to reopen schools amid the 2nd wave of the pandemic. (Photo: Robert Green) Provincial governments in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba and Nova Scotia want to force millions of children, teachers and support staff into classrooms on January 17, even before the peak […]]]>
Teachers at Westmount High School in Montreal demonstrated against the Quebec government’s reckless decision to reopen schools amid the 2nd wave of the pandemic. (Photo: Robert Green)

Provincial governments in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba and Nova Scotia want to force millions of children, teachers and support staff into classrooms on January 17, even before the peak of the fifth wave of the pandemic caused by Omicron has been reached. the World Socialist Website urges educators and all workers to resist this homicide decision, which will lead to hundreds of thousands of infections and thousands of additional hospitalizations and deaths. They should be planning mass walkouts and strikes to close schools to in-person learning as part of a global strategy to stamp out COVID-19.

The imminent reopening of schools in Canada’s most populous provinces, Ontario and Quebec, follows the decision of the governments of the New Democratic Party of British Columbia and the United Conservative Party of Alberta to resume the classroom instruction last Monday.

The reopening of schools in Western Canada has already sparked powerful resistance from educators. Four teachers at Armstrong Elementary School near Vernon, British Columbia, filed unsafe work claims last week, citing poor classroom conditions and an insufficient supply of masks, forcing the school to close for two days . Teacher absence rates in interior British Columbia have risen sharply this week, no doubt due to a combination of increased COVID infections and opposition to the reckless reopening of schools.

In Alberta, the Calgary Board of Education reported a shortage of 681 teachers, with 208 unfilled on the first day of school. In Edmonton, 454 teachers and 252 teaching assistants were absent on the first day. While many of those absences are undoubtedly related to COVID-19 infections, many other educators are clearly voting with their feet.

Public anger among parents and education workers has boiled over in response to the openly pro-corporate justification for sending children back to overcrowded and poorly ventilated classrooms that are primed to spread the virus. Governments’ utter disregard for children, education workers and their families has struck a chord with the working class, which is quickly launching into an open struggle against these herd immunity policies.

As one Twitter user, Mat Wright (@matpVI), from Nanaimo, BC, tweeted: “This is not public health, this is public death. Do better… DBH [BC Chief Medical Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry] sets up generations for the evil of Long COVID.

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With the blessing and encouragement of the federal Liberal government led by Justin Trudeau, the provinces are determined to keep schools open amid an unprecedented tsunami of infections and spiraling hospitalizations and deaths so that parents are freed from their child care responsibilities and can go to work that produces profits for Canadian businesses. Government officials and public health officials are increasingly arguing that mass infection is a positive good because it will produce “herd immunity.” In truth, allowing the virus to spread so quickly has brought the healthcare system to the point of collapse, forcing hospitals to ration care to the detriment of patients’ health and lives, while creating perfect conditions for it mutates, potentially producing even more virulent variants.

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New Brunswick tightens COVID measures while Quebec and Nunavut lift some restrictions https://celenire.com/new-brunswick-tightens-covid-measures-while-quebec-and-nunavut-lift-some-restrictions/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 00:33:45 +0000 https://celenire.com/new-brunswick-tightens-covid-measures-while-quebec-and-nunavut-lift-some-restrictions/ New Brunswick announced tougher public health measures on Thursday as COVID-19 hospitalizations continued to rise in several provinces and the Omicron variant fueled more infections across Canada. New Brunswick announced tougher public health measures on Thursday as COVID-19 hospitalizations continued to rise in several provinces and the Omicron variant fueled more infections across Canada. Meanwhile, […]]]>

New Brunswick announced tougher public health measures on Thursday as COVID-19 hospitalizations continued to rise in several provinces and the Omicron variant fueled more infections across Canada.

New Brunswick announced tougher public health measures on Thursday as COVID-19 hospitalizations continued to rise in several provinces and the Omicron variant fueled more infections across Canada.

Meanwhile, Quebec has announced it will lift its curfew next week as researchers say the province may be over the worst of the latest wave of the pandemic. Nunavut also said it was ready to lift its lockdown measures as the number of cases dwindled in the territory.

Nunavut’s Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Michael Patterson, says strict measures put in place just before Christmas helped control the spread of COVID-19 which has spread through the territory like never before. previously.

On Monday, travel restrictions are due to end in Nunavut and businesses will be allowed to reopen. Schools have also been given the green light to resume in-person learning on January 24.

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs said new measures will take effect Friday. Residents will be restricted to a single-family bubble, and gyms, entertainment venues and restaurants inside restaurants must close.

Higgs said lockdown measures are a last resort, but necessary to protect the healthcare system.

Neighboring Prince Edward Island also announced it was extending the measures as its top doctor said the “worst of this wave” was yet to come.

Dr. Heather Morrison, chief medical officer of health, told a press conference in Charlottetown that it will likely be another two weeks before cases peak in the province, but said it was not clear how much worse it would get.

Current Prince Edward Island measures include a limit on personal gatherings to 10 people and capacity restrictions for businesses including gyms, retail and places of worship. Remote learning for school children will also continue.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, the final decision on whether or not to resume in-person learning has yet to be made. Officials said a safe return date will be announced next Wednesday.

The Public Health Institute of Quebec said Montreal may have peaked for this wave of COVID-19.

Quebec’s National Institute of Public Health said in a report that half of its simulations showed new cases had peaked and hospitalizations would peak by Monday. The other half suggests that the climax could be reached in the days or weeks to come.

Premier François Legault announced that Quebec’s provincial curfew – the only one in place in the country – will end on Monday.

The curfew has been criticized by social agencies as further marginalizing women facing violence, young people and low-income residents. The government said it was put in place to reduce the transmission of COVID-19.

Quebec reported an increase of 117 COVID-19-related hospitalizations, bringing its total to nearly 3,000.

Ontario also saw an increase in hospitalizations of 182 to an all-time high of 3,630. School boards have asked the province to reinstate COVID-19 reporting and tracking when schools reopen. schools next week, to support families and children who are already facing a lot of uncertainty.

The province also said it was trying to determine “true” COVID-19 mortality data by asking hospitals to document whether deaths were caused by or associated with the virus.

On Thursday, Manitoba’s chief public health officer said schools will no longer notify close contacts of individual infections when students also return there next week.

“Omicron is so highly infectious (and) has a shorter incubation period that by the time you do contact tracing, many contacts could already be symptomatic,” Dr Brent Roussin said.

A school board in Delta, B.C., is requiring its employees to show proof of COVID-19 vaccinations to protect staff and students. Staff who are not vaccinated will have to undergo regular rapid tests or take unpaid leave.

In Saskatchewan, Premier Scott Moe tested positive for the virus after taking a rapid antigen test. He isolated himself and said he would work from home for the next five days.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, said about two in five people there test positive for the virus. With limited testing available to the public, provincial data shows only a fraction of the true spread of COVID-19.

“Not having access to the same level of detail and data can be disorienting. Not having access to testing for mild symptoms can be frustrating.”

She added that Albertans “still have the power” to protect themselves and their communities by following public health measures and exercising caution.

About 6,000 new cases have been reported in Alberta, bringing its number of active cases to nearly 63,000.

In Ottawa, the federal government said a vaccination mandate for truckers entering Canada from the United States would begin on Saturday as planned, despite an earlier statement from the Canada Border Services Agency that Canadian truckers would be exempted.

Officials said the CBSA statement Wednesday night was “provided in error” and that Canadian truckers must be vaccinated if they are to avoid quarantine and a pre-arrival molecular test.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on January 13, 2022.

Alanna Smith, The Canadian Press



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Quebec will start imposing fines on those who refuse the COVID vaccine https://celenire.com/quebec-will-start-imposing-fines-on-those-who-refuse-the-covid-vaccine/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 01:17:55 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-will-start-imposing-fines-on-those-who-refuse-the-covid-vaccine/ By Paula Newton | CNN The Canadian province of Quebec announced on Tuesday that residents who refused a Covid-19 vaccine will soon have to pay a fine. The fines will be a way for the unvaccinated to contribute to an overburdened public health system, authorities said. “At the moment, these people, they are placing a […]]]>

By Paula Newton | CNN

The Canadian province of Quebec announced on Tuesday that residents who refused a Covid-19 vaccine will soon have to pay a fine.

The fines will be a way for the unvaccinated to contribute to an overburdened public health system, authorities said.

“At the moment, these people, they are placing a very significant burden on our health network, and I think it is normal for the majority of the population to demand that there be a consequence”, declared the Prime Minister from Quebec François Legault at a press conference Tuesday.

“It is also a question of fairness for the 90% of the population who have made sacrifices – and I think we owe them this kind of measure,” he added.

The fine would not apply to people on medical waivers, and no details were announced. However, Legault said the amount to be collected would be “significant”.

Nearly 90% of eligible Quebecers have received at least one dose of a vaccine against Covid-19, according to the government of Quebec.

Public health officials say the vast majority of patients in Quebec hospitals are still not vaccinated. Authorities have not specified how many hospitalized Covid patients are not vaccinated.

Last week, Quebec announced that residents would need to get vaccinated to buy alcohol or cannabis. Quebec Health Minister Christian Dubé said in a tweet that after the announcement, nominations for vaccines increased.

“In a few days, the appointments for the 1st dose went from 1.5K per day to over 6K yesterday. Thank you to everyone who decided to get vaccinated. It is not too late to get your 1st dose. Protect yourself, ”Dubé said.

Quebec, where nearly a quarter of all Canadians live, was one of the first provinces in Canada to introduce a vaccination passport. Proof of vaccination is required to eat out, go to the gym or attend sporting events.

And last month, a nighttime curfew was imposed a second time to curb the spread of the virus.

Quebec is not the first to take such measures to encourage people to be vaccinated.

Last week, Italy made vaccination against Covid-19 compulsory for people aged 50 and over.

Proof of vaccination is already compulsory for teachers and health workers in Italy. And all employees have been required to show proof of vaccination or a negative test before entering their workplace since October.

The new decree on vaccines for 50 years and over removes the possibility of taking a test instead of being vaccinated. Those who refuse to be vaccinated face a fine of 600 to 1,500 euros (about 680 to 1,700 dollars), a government source told CNN on Thursday.

After five days, they will lose their salary but will not be fired from their position. That means they can get paid again if they get the shot, the source said.

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Increase in hospitalization cases in Ontario and Quebec; British Columbia and Alberta prepare to go back to school https://celenire.com/increase-in-hospitalization-cases-in-ontario-and-quebec-british-columbia-and-alberta-prepare-to-go-back-to-school/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:53:07 +0000 https://celenire.com/increase-in-hospitalization-cases-in-ontario-and-quebec-british-columbia-and-alberta-prepare-to-go-back-to-school/ Paramedics walk a patient past ambulances outside a Toronto hospital on January 5. Hospitals in many parts of Canada are under the weight of the Omicron variant of COVID-19.Chris Young / The Canadian Press The rapidly spreading Omicron variant of COVID-19 pushed hospital admissions to dangerous levels over the weekend in eastern Canada, as children […]]]>

Paramedics walk a patient past ambulances outside a Toronto hospital on January 5. Hospitals in many parts of Canada are under the weight of the Omicron variant of COVID-19.Chris Young / The Canadian Press

The rapidly spreading Omicron variant of COVID-19 pushed hospital admissions to dangerous levels over the weekend in eastern Canada, as children in westernmost provinces braced for return to class on Monday.

The vast majority of Omicron cases are mild – milder than those associated with previous COVID-19 variants, experts say increasingly at ease – but the sheer volume of infections is pushing some hospitals beyond their capacity limits.

Quebec reports 2,436 hospitalizations, 23 more deaths linked to COVID-19

Ontario Reports 412 COVID-19 ICU Patients, 2,419 Hospitalizations

Quebec reported 140 new admissions on Sunday of COVID-19 patients to hospitals, for a total of 2,436. Critical care cases have jumped to 257. In Ontario, hospitalizations have reached 2,419, although not all hospitals in the province are reporting the number of cases to weekends. There were 412 COVID-19 patients in intensive care units across Ontario.

Last week, after doctors at Bluewater Health in Sarnia, Ont. Saw the number of COVID-19 cases quadruple from pre-Christmas levels, they issued an open letter to their community: t socialize) , get vaccinated / boosted as soon as possible and wear a mask in indoor public spaces, ”he said.

Mike Haddad, chief of staff at Bluewater, said the hospital’s intensive care unit and medical floor were both at full capacity, mostly with unvaccinated patients. In Lambton County, where Sarnia is located, COVID-19 vaccination rates are lower than the provincial average. Sometimes patients who have been hospitalized will have a chance to talk about some of the misinformation about vaccines they have heard and then ask to be vaccinated when it is too late to help, Dr Haddad said. His hope is to reach more people before they get infected.

“Patients come to us and are convinced that we will do our best to save them through science. It is this same science that created vaccination for many decades, ”said Dr Haddad.

At Hamilton Health Science’s Juravinski Hospital, the intensive care unit is operating above capacity. The staff had to double the patients in the intensive care rooms.

“When Omicron’s numbers started increasing in mid-December, the ICU numbers were stable… But around Christmas time, we started to see them increase. And they just kept increasing, ”said Bram Rochwerg, intensive care physician and Juravinski site manager.

This spring, intensive care cases in Ontario topped 900, but Dr Rochwerg warned that hospitals are currently understaffed so the system is no longer able to handle anything close. Some staff are absent with infections or COVID-19 exposures. Others had to take stressful time off, he said.

Elyse Berger Pelletier, emergency physician at The Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, in Lévis, Quebec, reported the same problem: “We have empty beds, it’s just that we don’t have nurses to take care of the patients”, a- she declared.

In Laval, intensive care doctor Joseph Dahine said part of the recent increase in admissions came from non-COVID-19 patients, whose health care was delayed in previous waves of the pandemic, when people infected with the virus flooded hospitals.

“These patients are sicker than ever. Their care is suspended, but not their underlying disease. Their cancer is progressing. They come in with a heart attack because they haven’t had their symptoms checked, ”said Dr Dahine.

Parents in British Columbia and Alberta worried as schools prepare to reopen amid COVID-19 outbreak

As Omicron spreads across the country, schools in Alberta and British Columbia will resume classes on Monday after the governments of both provinces imposed an additional week off to allow time to put in place stricter security measures after the Christmas holidays. Schools in Saskatchewan – which broke its daily infection record on Friday with 1,170 new cases – started on schedule last week. (Students in Ontario and Quebec are now taking online courses. In-person learning is expected to resume on January 17.)

Some parents and advocates are concerned that the protective measures currently in place in schools are insufficient, given Omicron’s contagiousness and relatively low vaccination rates among young children.

Julia Hengstler, a member of the Safe Schools Coalition BC advocacy group, has decided to keep her son at home. Ms Hengstler said her biggest concerns are the detente of the province physical distancing guidelines and its lack of investment in technology – such as HEPA filters and high-quality masks – to reduce contagion in shared spaces.

The British Columbia Ministry of Education said measures instituted since the start of the pandemic will remain in place, including masks and physical distancing, start and end times for staggered activities and reconfigured classrooms. The ministry has reserved 500,000 rapid tests for Kindergarten to Grade 12.

Security issues are also weighing on Alberta parents who have to send their children back to classrooms.

Wing Li, communications director for Support our Students Alberta, a parent advocacy group, said all schools in the province should offer distance learning to families who prefer it. As it stands, not all of them do, she said, leading some parents to fear that Omicron will force children home again.

“It will be like phase six of this back-to-school distance learning roller coaster,” Ms. Li said. She added that she planned to send her child back to school on Monday and then monitor the situation. .

Educators are concerned that nothing has been done to improve safety in the classroom, said Jason Schilling, president of the Alberta Teachers Association. The government of Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has pledged to distribute rapid tests and medical-grade masks to schools, although these are not expected to arrive until the end of this week at the earliest.

“So we are going to open schools without everyone getting the bare minimum of what the government said it was going to put in place, and that is causing a lot of anxiety and stress among people,” M said. Schilling.

The Alberta Department of Health said it was weighing the risks of the virus to children against the possibility that being away from school will affect their mental health, learning and social interaction. He said the infection poses a low risk to children, especially the vaccinated. Government statistics show that 80 percent of the province’s 12 to 17 year olds have received two doses. About 37 percent of Albertans aged 5 to 11 have had at least one injection.

Joan Robinson, a Edmonton pediatric infectious disease specialist said the greatest risk to children is time away from the classroom.

She said her opinion of school closures would change if a variant emerged causing more serious illness in children.

“The reality is, unless an entire family lives like hermits, even if the child doesn’t go to school, there is always a reasonable chance that – with Omicron out there – someone in the household is going to bring COVID home anyway, ”says Dr. Robinson.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update bulletins are written by the editors of The Globe, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. register today.


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Files on passengers on Sunwing party flights sent to the Quebec prosecutor, according to the federal Minister of Health https://celenire.com/files-on-passengers-on-sunwing-party-flights-sent-to-the-quebec-prosecutor-according-to-the-federal-minister-of-health/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 21:44:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/files-on-passengers-on-sunwing-party-flights-sent-to-the-quebec-prosecutor-according-to-the-federal-minister-of-health/ About a quarter of travelers caught partying on a Sunwing flight from Montreal to Cancun at the end of last month have found their way back to Canada, according to Federal Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos. Duclos said 27 of the 130 passengers on the Dec. 30 flight, who were stranded in Cancun after Sunwing canceled […]]]>

About a quarter of travelers caught partying on a Sunwing flight from Montreal to Cancun at the end of last month have found their way back to Canada, according to Federal Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos.

Duclos said 27 of the 130 passengers on the Dec. 30 flight, who were stranded in Cancun after Sunwing canceled their return flight and several other airlines announced they would ban them, were able to return to Canada on four flights. different Wednesday.

Footage and video from the flight showed passengers ignoring public health measures, jumping and dancing in the aisle, vaping and openly circulating a bottle of hard liquor on the plane. In one video, a person was seen surfing the crowd as the plane was in the air.

WATCH | Raw video of the plane party that shocked the country:

Passengers without masks danced, vaporized and drank on Sunwing flight

Videos taken on a Sunwing flight from Montreal to Cancun on December 30 showed passengers ignoring public health measures, jumping and dancing in the aisle, vaping and passing each other a bottle of alcohol. 1:00

Federal and provincial collaborators: Duclos

At a press conference on Friday, Duclos said the passengers were stopped by border services officers on arrival and were to undergo COVID-19 testing.

Authorities also checked their vaccination information, the validity of their pre-arrival PCR tests and inquired about their quarantine plans, he said.

The health minister also said that the Quebec provincial police had contacted the Public Health Agency of Canada for contact details of the travelers.

He said the federal government had sent files on travelers to the Quebec prosecutor’s office, the Director of Criminal and Penal Prosecutions of Quebec (DPCP).

On Friday evening, however, spokesperson Audrey Roy-Cloutier tweeted that the DPCP had not yet received any records regarding the events that took place on the Sunwing flight on December 30.

In a follow-up, Roy-Cloutier said that when the DPCP receives passenger records and information from investigating federal authorities, the evidence will be analyzed to see if it warrants prosecution.

Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos said the Public Health Agency of Canada was in contact with the Quebec Provincial Police and the Provincial Prosecution Office regarding the party travelers on the Sunwing flight. (Justin Tang / Canadian Press)

Investigations can result in fines, jail time

The federal government issued a statement on Tuesday saying that the departments of Transportation, Public Safety and Health have all launched investigations into the incident.

According to the press release, Transport Canada could impose fines of up to $ 5,000 for each violation committed on board.

Additional fines and even jail time could result if the passengers are found to be endangering others or if they provide false information upon their return to Canada.

At least one of the passengers tested positive for COVID-19 after the flight to Mexico.

Rebecca St-Pierre, 19, confirmed to The Canadian Press that she tested positive on Wednesday and is currently in isolation in Tulum, south of Cancun.



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Quebec government failed to respond to petroleum jelly trick to simulate negative COVID-19 tests https://celenire.com/quebec-government-failed-to-respond-to-petroleum-jelly-trick-to-simulate-negative-covid-19-tests/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 14:18:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-government-failed-to-respond-to-petroleum-jelly-trick-to-simulate-negative-covid-19-tests/ “I’ll take a moment” The plane was reportedly mapped privately by the 111 Private Club, a self-proclaimed “exclusive” invitation-only group, for a New Years event it hosted in Mexico. James William Awad, who operates 111 Private Club, initially tweeted Tuesday night that “The 111 Private Club has followed all instructions given by Sunwing.” “The alcohol […]]]>

“I’ll take a moment”

The plane was reportedly mapped privately by the 111 Private Club, a self-proclaimed “exclusive” invitation-only group, for a New Years event it hosted in Mexico.

James William Awad, who operates 111 Private Club, initially tweeted Tuesday night that “The 111 Private Club has followed all instructions given by Sunwing.”

“The alcohol was sold to my group the entire flight,” he continued. “My group is A1.”


However, the next day he started to change his surroundings. On Jan. 5 at 1:04 p.m., he tweeted, “I’m taking this matter very seriously. A simple party on a plane made all the buzz. I’m going to take a moment to sit down and rethink everything. Especially how I can do the things. things better next time. Give me a moment to better understand the situation. “

Awad also responded to a CTV News article, which stated that “Sunwing had offered to fly the group home on their scheduled return flight January 5, but the group would not agree to the airline’s terms and conditions. “.

“I wanted to make sure that the group could eat during a 5 hour flight. Otherwise, I still accepted all the conditions,” he wrote.

Air Transat and Air Canada are also refusing to bring passengers on this flight back to Canada.

‘We were sleeping’

Meanwhile, on January 4, three reality TV personalities from the show The island of love posted a story on Instagram to tell their side of the story.

“As you know we are currently in Mexico and you saw in the papers this morning what happened on our flight and we just wanted to talk because we don’t want to pretend it never happened and everything, but at the same time we are also criticized for things we did not do […] We slept, “says Isabelle Labrecque, sitting next to Anna-Maëlle Laprise and Sandrine Seguin.

“There were 180 people on the flight. It was an organized flight. We didn’t have a lot of details on what was going to happen and it wasn’t the 180 people partying on the flight, it was was a minority. ”


@diaryofisabelle | Instagram

She went on to say that the incident had been sensationalized in the media but was also “unacceptable”.

“Things were overkill, but we’re not minimizing what happened during the flight […] We don’t identify with what happened on that flight, but don’t include everyone in it, ”she said.

Labrecque goes on to say that she and her friends haven’t bought alcohol, are vaccinated, and even have extra tests at the hotel to be able to do all the activities. She ends by apologizing if the situation hurts someone.

“Yes, it wasn’t right what happened, but I don’t think it’s necessary to send hateful messages, to maybe try to get Isa in trouble with his job as a pilot,” Laprise added, referring to the fact that Labrecque works as a pilot. “We have heard, we have understood and we are also in the same mood as you.”

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