Quebec Community – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 18:14:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec Community – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 Hospitalizations in Quebec for COVID-19 increase as new variants gain ground https://celenire.com/hospitalizations-in-quebec-for-covid-19-increase-as-new-variants-gain-ground/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 18:14:33 +0000 https://celenire.com/hospitalizations-in-quebec-for-covid-19-increase-as-new-variants-gain-ground/ MONTREAL — Quebec is seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations attributed to new Omicron subvariants that account for about 75% of infections, the province’s director of public health said Wednesday. dr. MONTREAL — Quebec is seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations attributed to new Omicron subvariants that account for about 75% […]]]>

MONTREAL — Quebec is seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations attributed to new Omicron subvariants that account for about 75% of infections, the province’s director of public health said Wednesday. dr.

MONTREAL — Quebec is seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations attributed to new Omicron subvariants that account for about 75% of infections, the province’s director of public health said Wednesday.

Dr. Luc Boileau said subvariants, such as BA2.12.1, BA.5 and BA.4, appear to be more transmissible than previous strains, but not necessarily more severe. The increase in cases was “expected”, although it came sooner than authorities thought, he said, adding that the number of new infections is expected to continue to rise in the days or weeks. to come before going down.

Boileau said the province does not plan to reimpose broad public health restrictions, but he recommended those over 65 or medically vulnerable take precautions such as wearing a mask. He was firm in his advice against a new province-wide masking order, insisting that such a measure was not “realistic” or necessary at this stage.

“We are not at all on track to reimpose population-level measures such as mask-wearing, or other measures that needed to be taken in the past two years,” he said.

“We’re not there, and we’re not going in that direction with the current variants.”

He said people over 60, immunocompromised or with chronic conditions should request a second booster shot if they haven’t had one or if it’s been more than three months since their last shot. Additionally, he said those who want to wear masks should be “encouraged” to do so, especially in crowded places.

His update came as hospitalizations for COVID-19 rose by 34 in the previous 24 hours, following an increase of 113 patients the previous day. There were 1,260 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in Quebec, including 35 in intensive care. Health officials have also reported four other deaths associated with the novel coronavirus.

Dr. Don Vinh of the McGill University Health Center says Quebec is facing a “perfect storm” of factors, including the emergence of new variants, waning immunity due to vaccination or previous infection, and the removal of public health restrictions.

The new Omicron BA.4 and BA.5 subvariants, he said in an interview on Tuesday, appear to be gaining traction and finding vulnerable people to infect, especially as the mutations appear to be better able to escape immunity than previous strains.

“You put the two together, new variants and waning immunity to infection, vaccination or a hybrid, and what happens is you have a renewed pool of susceptible people with an emerging variant,” did he declare.

The rise in hospitalizations, he added, comes at a time when the healthcare system is least prepared to deal with it.

Hospital workers at ‘all levels’ are overwhelmed, he said, from paramedics and EMTs to emergency room staff and community and home care workers who have to be there to care for people. frail people leaving the hospital.

COVID-19 is also putting increased strain on the system by forcing sick healthcare workers to stay home when they need it most, he said. “This is a catastrophic systemic failure unmasked and possibly even exacerbated by unmitigated community transmission.”

On Wednesday, Boileau expressed concern about the impact the increase in cases will have on the system, adding that authorities were working with hospitals to readjust services if necessary. He said, however, he did not expect the further increase in cases to become “very, very high” and that the numbers should start to come down in the coming weeks.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on June 29, 2022.

Morgan Lowrie, The Canadian Press

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Cycling pioneer continues to ‘make tracks’ (7 photos) https://celenire.com/cycling-pioneer-continues-to-make-tracks-7-photos/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/cycling-pioneer-continues-to-make-tracks-7-photos/ The Oro-Medonte elder pushed for the Simcoe County Museum exhibit which showcases ‘the important role of Hardwood, Horseshoe, Simcoe County Forest and cycling clubs’ Local championship mountain biker Ann Budge is considered a trailblazer in the sport. Its first race was in 1987, just a few years after the sport of mountain biking became popular. […]]]>

The Oro-Medonte elder pushed for the Simcoe County Museum exhibit which showcases ‘the important role of Hardwood, Horseshoe, Simcoe County Forest and cycling clubs’

Local championship mountain biker Ann Budge is considered a trailblazer in the sport. Its first race was in 1987, just a few years after the sport of mountain biking became popular.

Indeed, the first mass-produced mountain bike didn’t appear until 1981 with the Specialized-branded Stumpjumper, a name the brand still uses today. The sport’s popularity quickly began to skyrocket, with the bikes evolving from heavyweight “klunkers” to lightweight full-suspension trail killers as riders competed in events all over the world.

Now, thanks to Budge’s efforts, you can explore mountain biking history right here in Simcoe County at a special exhibit, Making Tracks – Mountain Biking in Simcoe County, at the Simcoe County Museum through September 5. .

“Simcoe County, specifically Oro-Medonte, is the hub of mountain biking in Eastern Canada, with the exception of parts of Quebec,” she noted. “But we have Hardwood Ski and Bike Race Nights, Horseshoe Resort Downhill Courses, Copeland Forest, Simcoe County Trails; it really is the hub. We have to show it. »

Indeed, the Simcoe County Mountain Bike Club (SCMBC), formed in the 1990s, is now one of Ontario’s largest bike clubs and maintains a 150 km single-track trail network.

In 1993, Hardwood Hills (now Hardwood Ski and Bike) launched what has become Canada’s longest running weekly mountain bike racing series and both Hardwood and Horseshoe Resort are known internationally as venues for mountain bike events.

These events have attracted some of Canada’s top athletes to the region and have inspired many local athletes to become provincial, national and world champions. This year Hardwood Ski and Bike will host the 2022 Canadian Mountain Bike Championships July 21-24.

Budge started mountain biking at the age of 50 after learning that his daughter and son-in-law had started riding bikes.

“Let’s get some mountain bikes and join them,” Budge announced to her husband, Don. She quickly accepted her son-in-law’s challenge to enter a contest. After that first race, Budge was hooked. For the next 20 years, she competed in races in Quebec and the United States, including downhill, uphill, cross-country and even sand dune courses.

“I’m basically a competitive person,” Budge explained.

An avid cross-country ski competitor, Budge comes from a university athletic background at McGill University, where she competed in badminton, squash and basketball.

She remembers that one of her biggest accomplishments was being part of Canada’s National Mountain Bike Team in 1992.

“I wanted to do this so badly. I trained and trained and trained. I needed to qualify by accumulating points by competing in the Canada Cup qualifying events. It was so exciting to be part of the team and to compete at the World Championships in Bromont, Quebec.

Budge then won medals at the world masters championships in Bromont in 1999 and 2001, as well as numerous provincial and national championships. She continued to compete in mountain biking and cross-country skiing well into her 70s. Now 85, she only slowed down due to a devastating cycling accident seven years ago.

She was just finishing a bike ride in Oro-Medonte when she was hit by a school bus crossing a stop sign. After spending 12 weeks in hospital, Budge was able to return home to continue her long rehabilitation.

“They told me the only reason I was able to go home, and not to a nursing home, was because of who I was before the accident,” Budge said.

This physical form allowed him to regain his mobility and to walk again. She is not able to ride a bike or ski, but she still enjoys going out to volunteer at mountain bike races and is able to snowshoe in the winter.

“It’s so important to stay fit and healthy, especially when you’re older, because you never know.”

Budge’s impressive mountain biking accomplishments are showcased in the Making Tracks exhibit, where visitors can even see what she calls her “emergency” bike.

In the exhibit, Budge is joined by an outstanding group of local cyclists who have garnered national and international attention, including Olympian Peter Disera and current national mountain bike champion Jenn Jackson, both of Horseshoe Valley. .

Making Tracks is located in the museum’s Simcoe Gallery, where exhibition ideas come from the community. Over the past few years, Budge had approached leaders in the cycling community with his idea for a museum exhibit for mountain biking. His perseverance paid off. She got a call from the Simcoe County Museum earlier this year to say they were moving forward with her idea.

“We saw this as a perfect fit for summer,” said Simcoe County Museum Curator Kelley Swift Jones. “There has been an explosion in the popularity of cycling, especially during COVID-19. This exhibit gives us the opportunity to showcase this part of our history and the important role of Hardwood, Horseshoe, Simcoe County Forest and cycling clubs in the area.

“They did a great job,” Budge said. “It’s an interesting, informative and fun exhibit for cyclists and non-cyclists alike.”

For more information on visiting the Simcoe County Museum, go to museum.simcoe.ca.

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‘I’m from quebec. Full stop’: questions remain for Anglophones after the adoption of Bill 96 – Montreal https://celenire.com/im-from-quebec-full-stop-questions-remain-for-anglophones-after-the-adoption-of-bill-96-montreal/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 21:54:07 +0000 https://celenire.com/im-from-quebec-full-stop-questions-remain-for-anglophones-after-the-adoption-of-bill-96-montreal/ Born and raised in Quebec, Alison Ramsey has made efforts to live her life in the language of Molière, even though her heritage and mother tongue is English. But lately, she feels like her efforts aren’t enough. That’s because Bill 96, the provincial reform of the Charter of the French Language, goes too far, she […]]]>

Born and raised in Quebec, Alison Ramsey has made efforts to live her life in the language of Molière, even though her heritage and mother tongue is English.

But lately, she feels like her efforts aren’t enough. That’s because Bill 96, the provincial reform of the Charter of the French Language, goes too far, she said.

“I think it’s going to decimate our (government) services, I think it’s going to make us second-class citizens because we don’t have those rights,” Ramsey said. “I think it’s unfair. I think it’s demoralizing. I think it’s dehumanizing.

This feeling prompted Ramsey to write an article in the Journal de Chambly, titled “I am an Anglophone but am I a human?

She denounces the law which she says “denies her fundamental rights” and asks why the authorities are not instead focusing on building better access to education.

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“A lot of people came to see me and said thank you for the article and these people also live and work in French because that’s what we do, that’s how we live in Quebec and that’s that’s how we like to live in Quebec.” she says.

Read more:

Bill 96: opponents of the new French language law express their “sadness, frustration” at the demonstration

One such person is Sharron Wall, a small business owner.

“No one I know feels okay with that,” Wall says.

Both are concerned about the impact the bill will have on government services in English. They wonder about the improvement in the use of French through the reform and wonder what the real purpose of Law 96 is.

Columnist Josh Freed has a theory.

“I think it’s entirely a ploy to shout ‘nationalism’ and appeal to [Premier François Legault’s] vote rural and get more seats,” Freed says.

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Freed thinks the law is divisive and counterproductive.

“Friends who were sovereignists for years, or very nationalist friends are now angry with the bill,” Freed says. “They have succeeded in alienating all those who are not French-speaking in Quebec and it is a terrible thing.

Read more:

The CAQ suggests that only “historic Anglophones” in Quebec should have access to services in English

Politicians promised “historic English speakers” they would keep their rights. But Freed wonders how it will work.

“How am I even going to prove that I was a historical English speaker?” Freed wondered. “Do I have to go get my high school papers from the 1970s? I don’t have them anywhere. I guess I have to find my 5th grade teacher who would be 105 by now and have her testify that I went to school in English, you know.

Even the Quebec Department of Immigration could not answer this question. When asked for a definition of the term, a spokesperson wrote in an email to Global News that “Law 96 makes no mention of historic English speakers.”

Quebec Immigration Minister and author of the law, Simon Jolin-Barrette, declined Global News’ request for an interview.

For the constitutionalist Julius Grey, the absence of definition in the law “makes it totally unintelligible”, which could pose a legal problem.

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READ MORE: The Quebec legislature adopts Bill 96 linguistic reform in all margins

A law that cannot be interpreted and is unintelligible can be considered invalid, says Gray. But it could also be purposely left vague.

“It’s kind of a double whammy,” Gray explained. “On the one hand you don’t know what it means, on the other hand the potential for it to mean very big and very terrible things is high.”

For the group of English-speaking rights activists Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN), the term is “unrealizable”.

“It’s limiting, it’s insulting,” said Eva Ludwig, acting chair of the QCGN. “It denies the history, the experience, the contribution of English speakers in Quebec.”

They wrote an open letter to the Prime Minister against the notion of historical Anglophones. It was signed by thousands.

Meanwhile, Ramsey hopes to be accepted by the government for who she is: “I am a Quebecer. Full stop,” she said.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Ottawa Public Health reports rising levels of COVID-19 in the community https://celenire.com/ottawa-public-health-reports-rising-levels-of-covid-19-in-the-community/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:20:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/ottawa-public-health-reports-rising-levels-of-covid-19-in-the-community/ The City of Ottawa is experiencing an uptick in COVID-19-related hospitalizations, as the health unit warns of rising levels of COVID-19 in the community. Ottawa Public Health reports six Ottawa residents are hospitalized with an active COVID-19 infection on Friday, up from five on Tuesday. There is currently no one in the intensive care unit […]]]>

The City of Ottawa is experiencing an uptick in COVID-19-related hospitalizations, as the health unit warns of rising levels of COVID-19 in the community.

Ottawa Public Health reports six Ottawa residents are hospitalized with an active COVID-19 infection on Friday, up from five on Tuesday. There is currently no one in the intensive care unit with an active COVID-19 infection.

“Our indicators show rising levels of COVID-19 in the community. We are entering a new wave, and it remains important to use our layers of protection,” OPH said on Twitter Thursday.

“It’s important to remember that our diapers (including getting vaccinated, wearing a mask, and staying home when sick) help reduce your risk of serious illness, AND they help slow the spread of COVID in the community.”

OPH hospitalization figures only represent Ottawa residents who are hospitalized with an active case of COVID-19. Local hospitals are reporting higher numbers, which include patients who were admitted for reasons other than COVID-19 but tested positive and patients who are not from Ottawa.

Here is an overview of the number of COVID-19 patients in each hospital:

  • The Ottawa Hospital: 23 patients
  • Queensway Carleton Hospital: four patients
  • Montfort Hospital: Five patients
  • CHEO: Two patients

There has been one new death related to COVID-19 in Ottawa this week.

Ottawa Public Health is reporting 195 new cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa since Tuesday. The number of cases is considered an underrepresentation of the true amount of COVID-19 in the community due to provincial restrictions on who can access a PCR test.

Since the first case of COVID-19 in Ottawa in March 2020, there have been 74,641 laboratory-confirmed cases, including 818 deaths.


KEY STATISTICS ON COVID-19 IN OTTAWA

  • COVID-19 cases per 100,000 (June 16-22): 32.1 (versus)
  • Seven-day average of the positivity rate in the Ottawa community, excluding long-term care homes (June 15): 8.7%
  • Known active cases: 476 (+25)


COVID-19 VACCINES IN OTTAWA

Updated June 20.

  • Ottawa residents with 1 dose (5+): 917,832
  • Ottawa residents with 2 doses (5+): 883,284
  • Ottawa residents with 3 doses (12+): 580,600
  • Percentage of the population aged five and over having received at least one dose: 92%
  • Share of population five years and older fully vaccinated: 89%
  • Proportion of the population aged 12 and over receiving at least three doses: 64%

*Statistics for Ottawa residents who received one or more doses include anyone with an Ottawa postal code who was vaccinated anywhere in Ontario.


AROUND THE REGION

  • Eastern Ontario Health Unit: 3 in hospital, 0 in intensive care
  • Hastings Prince Edward Public Health: 3 in hospital, 0 in intensive care
  • Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Public Health: 8 in hospital, 0 in intensive care (updated only Tuesdays)
  • Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit: 1 in hospital, 1 in intensive care
  • Renfrew County and District Health Unit: 6 in hospital, 0 in intensive care
  • Outaouais (Gatineau and western Quebec): 42 in hospital, 0 in intensive care

These numbers are based on the latest data from each respective health unit at the time of publication.


COVID-19 OUTBREAKS

Ottawa Public Health is currently reporting active outbreaks in the following locations (as of Friday, June 17):

  • 6 long-term care homes
  • 6 retirement homes
  • 2 hospital units
  • 2 other collective places (group homes, assisted living, etc.)

OPH no longer reports outbreaks in schools and daycares or community outbreaks, such as those related to local businesses, religious institutions or sports and recreational activities.

A full list of locations with active outbreaks is available at OPH COVID-19 Dashboard.

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Commons could soon pass legislation to study environmental racism https://celenire.com/commons-could-soon-pass-legislation-to-study-environmental-racism/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/commons-could-soon-pass-legislation-to-study-environmental-racism/ The House of Commons is set to pass Canada’s first-ever environmental racism law – environmental hazards that disproportionately affect Indigenous, Black and other racialized communities. Bill C-226 is being voted on today and is expected to eventually pass the House of Commons with the support of the Liberals, NDP and Green Party. These parties are […]]]>

The House of Commons is set to pass Canada’s first-ever environmental racism law – environmental hazards that disproportionately affect Indigenous, Black and other racialized communities.

Bill C-226 is being voted on today and is expected to eventually pass the House of Commons with the support of the Liberals, NDP and Green Party.

These parties are hoping the bill can be expedited through unanimous consent and circumvent several procedural hurdles. This is not possible without the support of the other two opposition parties.

C-226 would require Parliament to develop a national strategy to gather information on environmental risks in BIPOCs (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) communities and address their impacts. This information could serve as the basis for modifying existing federal laws, policies and programs.

Supporters of the bill say they hope remaining parties will throw their support behind it when it returns for another vote.

“I really hope that we will finally, as a government, address the problem of environmental racism and injustice,” said one of the bill’s supporters, Nova Scotia-based activist Lynn Jones. .

Jones, an African Nova Scotian community leader, said she felt the impacts herself growing up on the shores of Cobequid Bay. She said her community and other black settlements in the province were isolated on the outskirts of Truro, Nova Scotia, where governments often located landfills and ignored flooding in the area for years.

“So living on the outskirts you often had the worst conditions. You often didn’t have all the amenities that other people in the city had,” she said.

First Nations and Métis communities have complained for years of being left with environmental threats such as the discharge of pulp mill effluent into the harbor near Pictou Landing First Nation in Nova Scotia. Scotland or the mercury contamination of the Grassy Narrows First Nation in Ontario.

Fishing boats sail past the Northern Pulp Mill as concerned residents, fishers and Indigenous groups protest the mill’s plan to dump millions of liters of effluent daily into the Northumberland Strait at Pictou, in Nova Scotia, July 6, 2018. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press)

Many of these communities have raised concerns about the health effects of environmental degradation, such as asthma, cancer and birth defects.

In his book On environmental racism, Ingrid Waldron, a professor in the Faculty of Humanities at McMaster University, called on policymakers to consider environmental racism as a form of “state-sanctioned racial” violence similar to police brutality.

“There is a kind of racist ideology that fits into an environmental policy where we tend to [exclude] people who we believe are not the most valuable in this world,” Waldron told CBC News.

Ingrid Waldron, a professor in the Faculty of Humanities at McMaster University and author of There’s Something in The Water, co-produced the film of the same name. His research on environmental racism inspired the creation of Bill C-226. (Steve Lawrence/CBC)

Elizabeth May, the Green MP sponsoring the bill, said there was no “grey area” between the violence racialized communities experience in encounters with police and the harmful effects of environmental racism.

Conservatives oppose the bill, arguing it could make it more difficult to approve resource projects — like the oil sands in Alberta — that tend to operate near Indigenous communities.

“We already have a complicated regulatory environment when we develop projects in this country,” Conservative environment critic Kyle Seeback said in April during one of the House debates on the bill.

The Bloc Québécois, for its part, refused its support because it feared that the bill would encroach on Quebec’s sovereignty, since the environment is generally an area of ​​provincial and territorial jurisdiction.

“We are convinced that it would be incoherent to claim to fight for environmental justice at the federal level while failing to advocate for the defense of Quebec’s environmental sovereignty,” said Bloc environment spokesperson Monique. Pauzé, during this same debate in April.

WATCH | How mercury poisoning affected Grassy Narrows First Nation:

How Mercury Poisoning Affected Grassy Narrows First Nation

“I grew up not knowing that the land, the water was already poisoned,” said Grassy Narrows First Nation Chief Randy Fobister.

This is the second attempt to pass environmental racism legislation in the House of Commons. Former Nova Scotia MLA Lenore Zann tried to push a similar bill through her province’s legislature when she was an MLA. The same bill died in the last Parliament before Zann lost his seat in the 2021 federal election.

Zann said she and her allies could have pushed the bill through had it not been for the word “racism”.

“White people always want you to take the word racism out,” Zann said. “It’s like it makes them nervous, right?

“They don’t want to admit that it exists… And I’m like, no, that’s the whole point of this bill.”

WATCH | Behind the push to tackle environmental racism:

Growing push to address and track environmental racism in Canada

Disproportionate exposure to environmental hazards has long had a greater impact on Indigenous, Black and racialized communities in Canada. A private member’s bill calls for a national strategy to address and track cases of environmental racism.


For more stories about the experiences of Black Canadians — from anti-Black racism to stories of success within the Black community — check out Being Black in Canada, a CBC project that Black Canadians can be proud of. You can read more stories here.

(Radio Canada)
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What it’s like to be a deaf teenager during a pandemic https://celenire.com/what-its-like-to-be-a-deaf-teenager-during-a-pandemic/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/what-its-like-to-be-a-deaf-teenager-during-a-pandemic/ What is it like to be deaf or hard of hearing in times of a pandemic? CBC Ottawa reached out to two teenagers from a west Ottawa school to understand their experience. Consortium Center Jules-Léger teaches students from from kindergarten to high school who are deaf, blind, deafblind, as well as those with learning disabilities. […]]]>

What is it like to be deaf or hard of hearing in times of a pandemic? CBC Ottawa reached out to two teenagers from a west Ottawa school to understand their experience.

Consortium Center Jules-Léger teaches students from from kindergarten to high school who are deaf, blind, deafblind, as well as those with learning disabilities. Because he is the only school in Canada outside Quebec that teaches students in French and using Quebec Sign Language (LSQ), many students live on campus.

Alicia and Kai say that being able to communicate with their peers in Quebec Sign Language (LSQ) makes them feel more connected as a community. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

CBC spoke to Alicia Mbesha (11th grade) and Kaï Haché (Grade 12) — with the help of LSQ interpreter Ginie Petit — to learn about the challenges they faced during the pandemic, their experience at school and their hopes for the future.

This interview has been edited for length, style and clarity.

Alicia Mbesha is an 11th grade student at the Consortium Center Jules-Léger. She says living in residence with other deaf students has helped her feel less isolated. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

Do you identify as deaf or hard of hearing?

Kai: I consider myself deaf and proud of it.

Alice: My community knows that my identity is definitely deaf, but with other people I will say that I am hard of hearing. Often, when I remove my hearing aids, I only speak verbally so that hearing people can understand me. But my first language is sign language.

Your families both live in Ottawa, but you have decided to live in the school residence. Why?

Kai: I love the residency because I can sign with my community. It’s more social, I have more accessibility with people thanks to the signature. I can speak my own language.

Alice: I decided to go to residence [a year ago] because I felt very isolated at home. I don’t have other deaf people in my community who can understand me. So it was very important for me to be with my deaf community.

Kaï Haché, a 12th grade student, hopes to become an engineer or a teacher after graduating from the Consortium Center Jules-Léger. He says being part of a co-op program has helped him prepare for the future. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

For me, being in residence changed almost everything. We are all in a similar world. It’s easier for me here because at home I have to repeat myself. People couldn’t understand me.

What impact has the pandemic had on your experience?

Kai: [Despite living on campus] all my classes were online which made us very tired. We constantly had to stare at the screen and try to follow.

Alice: Masks made it very difficult for deaf people. We couldn’t read lips for a long time. You also don’t see people’s facial expressions very clearly. It is impossible to communicate. We usually had to ask people if they would mind taking their masks off so we could communicate better.

What are your hopes for the future as you get closer to graduation?

Kai: I would like to become an engineer or a teacher. I love robotics. It’s my favorite area.

Haché and Mbesha say they have found a community within their school. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

Alice: My hope for the future is to go to college or university in health care. I’m a people-loving, caring person, but I’m still not 100% sure.

Kai, you’ve been a student at this school since the first year. How do you feel about leaving and entering mainstream education?

Kai: Here, all my lessons are suitable for me in sign language. We have interpreters, teachers and specialists to help us.

I would like to go to college first and then, if I can, I would like to go to a university in Ottawa. But I would like some help. I know I will have access to an interpreter and accommodations to make things more accessible for me.

Alicia, how ready do you feel to enter mainstream education after graduating?

Alice: I feel good, but I’m a little nervous about leaving school and my deaf community as well. Changing environments, interactions with everyone are going to be different. I will have to adapt.

To Jules-Léger Center Consortium, one can stay in school until the age of 21. So we have more time. We don’t need to graduate until we feel comfortable and ready.

Consortium Center Jules-Léger is the only school outside of Quebec that teaches students only in spoken French and LSQ. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

What do you want people to know about your experience as a deaf student in Ottawa?

Kai: Don’t be afraid to ask us questions or ask me questions. I can speak. I can sign. I can communicate. I can write. I can communicate in any way so that we can exchange information. It is still possible to make it work.

Alice: I want you to know that sign language allowed me to see the world in a different way. My identity is clear now. It is a beautiful language. It’s really fun and I encourage everyone to learn this language.

My community is truly wonderful. It’s nice. It is a culture.

Very often people ask me, ‘Oh, can you become hearing? Is there a solution ?’ For me, it’s like “no, I don’t want to”. I was born like this.’

I don’t want to change. I can’t become a hearing person anyway. I am very happy as I am. I am who I am.


COVID has brought to light the communication challenges faced by people who are deaf and hard of hearing, particularly due to the impact of masks. CBC Ottawa reached out to members of this community to ask what they’ve been through during the pandemic and what they want people to know about their lives.

If you have a story you would like to share about being deaf, Email us.

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Southern Quebec hit by power outages, flooding after severe thunderstorms https://celenire.com/southern-quebec-hit-by-power-outages-flooding-after-severe-thunderstorms/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:34:48 +0000 https://celenire.com/southern-quebec-hit-by-power-outages-flooding-after-severe-thunderstorms/ Round after round of thunderstorms in southern Quebec caused flooding and left thousands of homes in the dark Thursday. Environment Canada reports that 41,000 Hydro-Quebec customers were without power at the height of the storm. “The cuts are mainly caused by the contact of vegetation with the network following high winds,” the utility wrote on […]]]>

Round after round of thunderstorms in southern Quebec caused flooding and left thousands of homes in the dark Thursday.

Environment Canada reports that 41,000 Hydro-Quebec customers were without power at the height of the storm.

“The cuts are mainly caused by the contact of vegetation with the network following high winds,” the utility wrote on its website Thursday evening.

A disorderly mix of heavy rain and high winds swept through Montreal and several other areas for hours, beginning in the late afternoon and continuing well into the evening.

“Amounts of rain of 40 to 60 millimeters fell in less than three hours in the Greater Montreal area, causing flooding,” the weather agency said in a statement Friday.

READ MORE: Hydro-Quebec says deadly spring storm cost $70 million

In Montreal, the downpour caused flooding in some streets and highways. Rainwater also seeped into part of the city‘s subway system and temporarily disrupted service on the Blue Line.

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Powerful thunderstorms also wreaked havoc on air travel. There were a slew of flight cancellations and delays at Trudeau Airport Thursday night.

Environment Canada had issued several warnings for areas in the southern half of the province, including tornado watches for some areas.

The weather event was so violent that houses were damaged in some areas, including the community of Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac in Deux-Montagnes. The weather agency reports that lightning struck a residence and caused a fire.

The Sainte-Thérèse fire department said the damage was significant for two residences following the fire, but the situation was under control by early evening.

— with Canadian Press files

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Minister St-Onge announces the first two national recipients of the Sport for All Community Initiative https://celenire.com/minister-st-onge-announces-the-first-two-national-recipients-of-the-sport-for-all-community-initiative/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 16:45:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/minister-st-onge-announces-the-first-two-national-recipients-of-the-sport-for-all-community-initiative/ The investment will help launch accessible local organized sports and remove barriers to participation in sports programs. The full list of national recipient organizations will be announced this summer. OTTAWA (ON), June 15, 2022 /CNW/ – Removing barriers and increasing sport participation for underrepresented populations is a priority for the government of Canada. To support […]]]>

The investment will help launch accessible local organized sports and remove barriers to participation in sports programs. The full list of national recipient organizations will be announced this summer.

OTTAWA (ON), June 15, 2022 /CNW/ – Removing barriers and increasing sport participation for underrepresented populations is a priority for the government of Canada.

To support organized sport at the community level, the Honorable Pascale St-Onge, Minister of Sports and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the regions of Quebecand Adam van KoeverdenParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health and Minister of Sport, today announced the first two national organizations to receive Community Sport for All funding: Canadian Tire Jumpstart Charities ($6,858,000) and KidSport Canada ($4,430,000).

Community groups will be invited to submit their proposals to Canadian Tire Jumpstart charities to receive funding for their community projects. Through KidSport Canada’s regular grant program, community sport organizations will receive funds to help families in need pay for the cost of enrolling their children in community sport programs. The funding will be distributed to community groups starting this summer. Proposed activities will address barriers to sport participation, particularly among Black, Indigenous, racialized, 2SLGBTQQIA+, low-income, and newcomer populations as well as people living with disabilities.

It is important to note that Canadian Tire Jumpstart Charities and KidSport Canada are the first two national funding recipients to be announced. More opportunities for community groups to apply for funding will soon arise, as all national level grantees will be announced this summer. The role of recipients at the national level is to redistribute funds to community groups.

As announced in Budget 2021, up to $80 million over two years will be distributed across the country. The investment will help launch accessible local organized sports and remove barriers to participation in sports programs.

Quotation

“Every Canadian should have access to quality sport and physical activity. With today’s announcement of funding for the Community Sport for All Initiative, our government is reaffirming its commitment to building stronger, healthier communities across the country. The transformative power of sport plays an important role in It builds self-esteem and leadership skills and allows people to grow and thrive, physically, emotionally and socially.

—The Honorable Pascale St-Onge, Minister of Sports and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the regions of Quebec

“Canadians depend on physical activity and recreation for their physical and mental health, sense of community, belonging and enjoyment! But there are too many barriers and obstacles between some Canadians and their favorite activities. We are committed to supporting our neighbors’ pursuit of their healthiest and happiest lifestyles, and these investments support those goals. »

—Adam van Koeverden, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health and Minister of Sport

“The Canadian Tire Jumpstart Charities appreciates the incredible support of Sport Canada, which will help us continue to give children across the country equal access to sport and recreation. Through our extensive national network of partners, we already have plans to disperse $1 million of this funding to equity-deserving groups in every province and territory by the end of June. In addition, Jumpstart matches Sport Canada’s investment with $6.8 million of its own funds so that in total we help more than 1,000 organizations and up to 95,000 children. »

—Nadir Patel, Chairman of the Board, Canadian Tire Jumpstart Charities

“KidSport Canada is grateful to Sport Canada and the Honorable Pascale St-Onge for recognizing our efforts to break down barriers for children who want to play sports. We envision a Canada where all children have the opportunity to play sports, because we know it promotes their social skills, mental health and physical well-being. The reality is that cost prevents one in three Canadian children from participating in organized sport, especially children from marginalized or remote communities. With 166 chapters across the country, we provide grants to help cover their registration and equipment costs “So all the kids can play!” Funding is available through our KidSport grant program at: kidssportcanada.ca.”

—Greg Ingalls, General Manager, KidSport Canada

Fast facts

The Community Sport for All initiative aims to rebuild and increase sport participation rates, particularly among Black, Indigenous, racialized, 2SLGBTQQIA+, low-income, and newcomer populations, as well as people living with disabilities. Projects will adhere to the following principles:

  • Affordable: Projects will be delivered with minimal or no cost to participants.
  • Results oriented: Projects will be delivered in a way that increases sport participation and retention of equity-deserving communities and ultimately drives behavior change.
  • Focus on organized sport: Although other activities may be included (such as the development of motor skills), the main activity must be an organized sport and must respect safe sports practices.
  • Green: The delivery of the projects should produce a minimal or positive environmental impact.
  • Accessible: Projects must be tailored to groups deserving equity, but must not be exclusive and can be open to all, and must allow for a wide range of athletic abilities.
  • Available: Projects should seek to be delivered in underserved communities and achieve regional diversity.

Community groups are encouraged to contact Charities Canadian Tire Jumpstart and KidSport Canada learn how to submit their proposals to receive funding.

Canadian Tire Jumpstart Charities is a national charitable organization committed to ensuring children in need have equal access to sport and recreation. With an extensive national network of more than 1,000 grantees and 289 local chapters, Jumpstart helps eligible families cover registration, transportation and equipment costs, and provides funding to select organizations for infrastructure and programs. Recreation. Backed by the Canadian Tire family of companies, Jumpstart has provided more than two million opportunities for Canadian children to get involved in play since 2005.

KidSport is a national non-profit organization, with financial support provided by the Government of Canada, which helps remove the financial barriers that prevent children from playing sports by providing assistance with registration fees and sports equipment for children 18 and under. Through a confidential application process, grants are administered by KidSport’s 166 community chapters so they can play a season of organized sport.

Related links

Community Sport for All Initiative – Sport Support Program

Charities Canadian Tire Jumpstart

KidSport Canada

Budget 2021 – A recovery plan for jobs, growth and resilience

SOURCE Canadian Heritage

For further information: For further information (media only), please contact: Ariane Joazard-Bélizaire, Press Attaché, Office of the Minister of Sports and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, [email protected]; Media Relations, Canadian Heritage, 1-819-994-9101, 1-866-569-6155, [email protected]

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Ottawa says school in Barriere Lake, Quebec has no mussel, but Algonquin community unconvinced https://celenire.com/ottawa-says-school-in-barriere-lake-quebec-has-no-mussel-but-algonquin-community-unconvinced/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 21:39:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/ottawa-says-school-in-barriere-lake-quebec-has-no-mussel-but-algonquin-community-unconvinced/ The federal government says no mold has been detected at Kitiganik Elementary School in the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake. The school is closed due to mold concerns, but Indigenous Services Canada says, based on reports from the Grand Council of the Waban-Aki Nation, the First Nations Education Council and the Departmental Representative of the […]]]>

The federal government says no mold has been detected at Kitiganik Elementary School in the Algonquin community of Barriere Lake.

The school is closed due to mold concerns, but Indigenous Services Canada says, based on reports from the Grand Council of the Waban-Aki Nation, the First Nations Education Council and the Departmental Representative of the ISC, that “the building can be used safely. “

The ISC statement also says “no traces of mold were detected inside the school.”

But the school principal is not so sure and the school, which has 70 to 75 students, will remain closed until further notice.

Larry Deschênes wears a mask as he descends into a hole to examine the school’s foundation for mold. (Delphine Jung/Radio-Canada)

Judy Deschênes says she does not know if the school is safe or not and cannot reassure parents at this time. She said that although reports indicate that no mold has been detected in the school, there are still doubts in the community due to the age of the building.

ISC report confirms there is a bad smell inside the school, but says it was caused by a pipe that broke in early May and led to a water leak worn in the crawl space. As the air intake for the school’s ventilation system is near this crawl space, the strong odor permeated the entire building.

Deschênes says students are currently learning in different buildings inside and outside the community until the end of the school year.

The ISC said in a statement that the Grand Council of the Waban-Aki Nation will hire a firm to test the air quality in the school and “if the assessment reveals that the air quality is adequate, students, who have been relocated to the interim, should be able to return to school.”

Classrooms are empty and students have been moved to other buildings until the end of the school year. (Delphine Jung/Radio-Canada)

The federal government says there have been inspections over the years at the Kitiganik school. However, according to the community and even the ISC’s own list of recent inspections, there has been no certified inspection of the molds.

However, in a statement, the ISC agrees that the current school in Barriere Lake is outdated and does not meet the educational needs of the community.

According to community members, the 50-year-old school has recurring problems with mold, broken pipes and leaks.

“Not just mold issues, but also power shortages. With the roof leaking, it causes problems. It creates dangerous situations,” said Chief Tony Wawatie of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake Band Council.

“It’s a school that’s been ‘fixed’ every year, every spring. That moldy smell comes out even though it’s covered. That’s something that worries me,” Wawatie said.

The school principal says there is water damage and other maintenance issues. (Delphine Jung/Radio-Canada)

Principal Deschênes said she first noticed a damp smell in August 2021 when she started working at the school.

This year she said the smell was strong and the staff complained about it. Deschênes said the school had a history of water damage and the ground was rotting at one end of the school.

“There is definitely a lot of work to be done to make it a safe school for children,” Deschênes said.

“We have a lot of people with respiratory issues. It’s not just the kids, it’s the adults in the building. We have kids with life-threatening illnesses. We want a good place,” she said .

Former chief and current band councilor Casey Ratt says parents don’t trust the school. Her three young children attend school.

“It’s scary, I don’t want my kids to have permanent respiratory problems from this mold issue. We have kids going to this school who need something. And that something is a new school. , or something temporary for now,” Ratt said.

Barriers to construction

According to the band council, a new school was to be built in 2017, but there is a major obstacle: Lac Barrière does not have access to the electricity grid.

The community of about 500 people is powered by a generator which, according to the band council, is at maximum. They need another power source to build any infrastructure.

The community has worked to clean up the school but they say the solution is a new building. (Delphine Jung/Radio-Canada)

In a statement from the ISC, they said “unless the community provides clear direction on its intentions regarding the school’s power supply and site, construction cannot proceed.”

The chief said the problem with connecting to the Hydro-Quebec grid is affordability.

“We are a community that is 90% unemployed on welfare. How can we charge our members for Hydro when they can’t afford it? »

The chief said the original location of the new school was too close to the shore and prone to erosion, as Barrier Lake is built on the shore of a water reservoir for a Hydro dam. -Quebec.

The school, Wawatie said, is just one example of the deep needs of her community.

“These children deserve a new school. They need a better life than they are living now,” Wawatie said.

On June 10, Vance Badawey, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous Services, came to Barriere Lake with Pontiac MP Sophie Chatel to discuss the community’s electrification, housing and infrastructure needs and health issues. public.

According to the chief, a location to build the school and a source of electrification has not yet been decided. There is still no timetable as to when a new school will be built.

LISTEN | To Breakaway’s coverage of the Kitiganik school closure:

13:45Kitiganik school closed in May due to what was believed to be mold contamination

Over the past few months, parents in the Algonquin community of Barrier Lake say they have been forced to make a difficult choice. Continue to send their children to school for an education or pull them out lest they get sick.

11:48Kitiganik school closed in May due to suspected mold contamination

A school on an Algonquin reserve in western Quebec closed last month due to a suspected mold problem. We will hear why securing a new school for the community has still not happened despite years of back and forth between the community and the federal government.

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Visual effects experts gather in Montreal for a ‘talent showcasing’ conference https://celenire.com/visual-effects-experts-gather-in-montreal-for-a-talent-showcasing-conference/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 23:49:56 +0000 https://celenire.com/visual-effects-experts-gather-in-montreal-for-a-talent-showcasing-conference/ Visual effects experts gathered at the Montreal Science Center last week, gathered under one roof to discuss their craft. It’s an area that accounts for 6,000 jobs in Quebec – but like many industries, it faces a post-pandemic drought in competition with London and Los Angeles. “It was essential for us, as a major global […]]]>

Visual effects experts gathered at the Montreal Science Center last week, gathered under one roof to discuss their craft.

It’s an area that accounts for 6,000 jobs in Quebec – but like many industries, it faces a post-pandemic drought in competition with London and Los Angeles.

“It was essential for us, as a major global player, to ensure that we were able to showcase the great talent and innovation of the visual effects community,” said Christine Maestracci, CEO of the Council for Cinema and Quebec Television (CFTQ), which hosted the conference.

The event saw the likes of Brian Connor, the Oscar-winning effects artist for Dune, as well as representatives from Montreal-based effects company Rodeo FX.

“You always have a lot of talent to work with [in Quebec] that transformed the industry,” Connor said.

GET CREATIVE

Jordan Soles, vice president of technology and animation at Rodeo FX, said the company is constantly on the lookout for people with “creative flair”.

A creativity that comes in handy when trying, for example, to recreate a casino town in China… at a time when filming in China is not allowed.

“Shang Chi was awesome. We did an extremely choreographed sequence on top of scaffolding that was supposed to be shot in Macau. But then COVID hit and we were able to recreate an all-digital version of that city,” Soles said. .

These days, most special effects are digital. But some artists, like Olivier Barbes-Morin of Rodeo Fx, use old-school techniques.

For example, to make poisonous bubbling wine for Fantastic Beasts, Barbes-Morin simply poured nail polish remover onto a piece of styrofoam.

It’s an old-school approach that the studio mixes with digital magic.

“If someone was at their computer trying to make a random bubble generator, it would work, it would love something,” Barbes-Morin said. “But would it look like the real thing? Your guess is as good as mine.”

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