Quebec Community – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 12:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec Community – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 HALF-MILLION DOLLARS AWARDED FOR THE SECOND CONSECUTIVE YEAR AS PART OF THE MONDOU MONDON CAMPAIGN FOR THE MIRA FOUNDATION https://celenire.com/half-million-dollars-awarded-for-the-second-consecutive-year-as-part-of-the-mondou-mondon-campaign-for-the-mira-foundation/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 12:03:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/half-million-dollars-awarded-for-the-second-consecutive-year-as-part-of-the-mondou-mondon-campaign-for-the-mira-foundation/ The Quebec family business donated more than $3 million to the MIRA Foundation since 2015 thanks to the exceptional generosity of its clients and partners MONTREAL, November 22, 2022 /CNW Telbec/ – A faithful partner of Mira for decades, Mondou has announced the November 17 that he raised a total of $500,000 for the second […]]]>

The Quebec family business donated more than $3 million to the MIRA Foundation since 2015 thanks to the exceptional generosity of its clients and partners

MONTREAL, November 22, 2022 /CNW Telbec/ – A faithful partner of Mira for decades, Mondou has announced the November 17 that he raised a total of $500,000 for the second consecutive year during the 8e edition of its Mondou Mondon campaign for the MIRA foundation, which took place in 80 Mondou stores across Quebec as well as online at Mondou.comof September 29 to November 13. This represents $50,000 higher than the initial target set at $450,000bringing the total amount of donations collected to more than $3 million since the launch of this initiative in 2015. The unveiling of the results and the presentation of the check took place during a day of special activities dedicated to Mira, a foundation that changes the daily lives of thousands of people thanks to its guide dogs and its service dogs.

From left to right: Marie-France Dumont, Vice-President Marketing, Brand and Product Strategy Development, Dr. Paule Jacques de Mira, Marie-Josée Legault, family member, Marie-France Legault, family member , Nicolas St-Pierre, general manager of Mira, Marc-Antoine Legault, member of the family, Pierre Leblanc, CEO Mondou. (CNW Group/Mondou)

The purpose of this discovery event, held at Mondou’s head office in Anjou, was to demonstrate to its partners in recent years the importance of giving generously to support this cause, as well as to highlight all the work and efforts behind the achievements of this emblematic foundation. For the occasion, veterinarians, animal health specialists, trainers, beneficiaries, foster families, as well as representatives of the Mondou and Mira teams were invited to come and celebrate the closing of the 8e edition of the Mondou Mondon campaign for the Mira Foundation.

On site, participants were presented with six Mira thematic activities, representing various facets of the organization: beneficiaries, foster families, blindfolded obstacle course, dog training, veterinary and animal care, as well as a canine petting area and photo shoots.

A SUCCESSFUL 8E FUNDRAISER

“Once again, we would like to warmly thank our partners, suppliers, collaborators and employees, as well as Quebecers for their immense generosity, which has enabled us to support Mira for several years now. The organization contributes to the quality of life and well-being of thousands of individuals with visual or physical impairments or with autism spectrum disorders. This surge of generosity is all the more remarkable as everyone has to deal with an economic environment marked by inflation and the increase in the cost of living. Since its foundation in 1938, Mondou is committed to supporting several causes dedicated to animal welfare and the community, such as the Mondou Mondon campaign for the MIRA foundation, which has become an annual tradition,said Pierre LeBlancCEO of Mondou.

This year, Mondou invited the public to take part in this initiative by various means, either by visiting one of the Mondou stores or by visiting Mondou.com. Customers could purchase the new Woof Pack box, which combines an assortment of dog treats and toys ($23.99)the Mondou emergency key ring with a “Save my pet” card ($6.99)the MIRA 2023 calendar ($6) or the adorable Mira soft toy ($14.99). Depending on the product, some or all of the proceeds from the sale were donated to MIRA.

AN INITIATIVE THAT HELPS CHANGE LIVES
Donations received as part of the Mondou Mondon campaign will be directed, among other things, to training MIRA dogs and helping their foster families, trainers and beneficiaries. To support this organization, which does not receive government subsidies, Mondou also donates more than 110 tons of food each year to the Mira Foundation to help feed its guide dogs and assistance dogs.

DEPARTURE 1ST DECEMBER: THE THE FIRST MONDOU MONDON FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN FOR THE CHUV IS LAUNCHED JUST BEFORE THE HOLIDAYS!
The very first Mondou Mondon campaign for the CHUV (University veterinary hospital) will be launched in a few days. This new initiative aims to raise funds to help the educational establishment acquire new equipment in order to remain at the cutting edge of technology in the field of animal care. Stay tuned and visit the Mondou.com website for all the details!

ANIMAL WELFARE AT THE HEART OF MONDOU’S MISSION
In addition to its Mondou Mondon campaign for the MIRA Foundation, Mondou organizes the Mondou Mondon campaign for shelters, which has raised nearly one million dollars over the past five years. A fervent supporter of responsible adoption, Mondou has inaugurated four adoption areas for cats from rescue shelters in his Saint-Jérôme, Anjou, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Joliette store locations since April 2019.

About Mondo

Founded in 1938 by Montreal entrepreneur Joseph-Émilien Mondou, Mondou is a QuebecFamily business with a family character that offers products, services and advice aimed at the health and well-being of pets of all kinds. Since the Legault family bought this very successful Quebecin 1983, the company saw its number of stores increase from 1 to 80 thanks to the exceptional commitment of its passionate employees, who today number more than 1,100 across Quebec. Much more than just a pet food store, Mondou stands out from its competitors through the expertise of its team of seasoned advisors and its commitment to refrain from selling animals. Placing animal welfare at the heart of its values, Mondou is strongly committed to its partner organizations and campaigns to further advance the cause of animal welfare through the implementation of several initiatives. For more information, visit www.mondou.com.

SOURCEMondou

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New Exhibit Sheds Light on Quebec’s Long-Ignored Haitian Artists https://celenire.com/new-exhibit-sheds-light-on-quebecs-long-ignored-haitian-artists/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/new-exhibit-sheds-light-on-quebecs-long-ignored-haitian-artists/ Dominique Fontaine doesn’t mince words about how Haitian artists have been sidelined from the Quebec art scene. Although they’ve been in the province for decades and constantly show their work, Haitian artists have only recently begun to make a splash on the mainstream scene in Montreal, Fontaine said. She said many art world institutions have […]]]>

Dominique Fontaine doesn’t mince words about how Haitian artists have been sidelined from the Quebec art scene.

Although they’ve been in the province for decades and constantly show their work, Haitian artists have only recently begun to make a splash on the mainstream scene in Montreal, Fontaine said.

She said many art world institutions have come to account in 2020 after widespread protests against anti-black racism — and now they’re looking for black and Haitian artists, who previously went unrecognized.

“People do their my culpathey open doors for artists who were underrepresented, overlooked,” Fontaine said.

“We are here, we are present and we can no longer be ignored.”

From now on, Fontaine puts them at the center of a new exhibition. Sovereign Imaginaries presents 15 Quebec and Canadian artists of Haitian origin and is available in two places: the Janine-Sutto House of Culture and Galerie Hugues Charbonneau.

“These new Haitian-Quebec, Haitian-Canadian artists bring so much energy to the field. They’re bold, they’re bold, they’re here… [and now] people care about what they do,” Fontaine said.

“We had to capture him.”

Esther Calixte-Bea is one of the artists participating in the new exhibition. (Louis-Marie Philidor/CBC)

Long to come, artists say

Hugues Charbonneau, the gallery’s owner, said the Haitian community has long been waiting for some recognition on the Canadian art scene.

“Manuel Mathieu, an artist I worked with, he was the first Haitian artist to be brought together at the Museum of Fine Arts,” he said. “It was three years ago!”

Charbonneau said some of the Haitian artists from Quebec here have gone abroad. Gelsy Verna, a Haitian-born visual artist raised in Montreal, had a successful teaching career in the United States until her death in 2008. But here?

“She is not part of any museum collection, she is not known to the public,” Charbonneau lamented.

Stéphane Martelly, painter who creates under the name of Nou, knows the feeling. She said Haitian artists in Quebec have long struggled with Haiti’s bold artistic culture, while not being recognized for their work.

“Institutions are catching up with us and following the agenda, so to speak, and realizing that there’s all this vitality that needs to be visible,” she said.

Esther Calixte-Bea, a young university graduate, is one of the artists participating in the exhibition.

“Being part of this exhibit is an amazing feeling,” she said. “Being around other Haitian artists, seeing colorful and interesting works…it’s so empowering for me.”

Fontaine, the curator, said seeing all the art together shows that Haitian artists bring “a new energy,” an energy that has flourished despite having gone unrecognized for so long.

This is partly what inspired the name, Sovereign Imaginaries.

“The title means it’s unrelated. The imagination, the artist’s ways of thinking, of expressing themselves…the artist finds ways to create, against all odds,” she said. declared.

The show kicked off this week and is expected to run until mid-January.

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Call for applications Pointe-Claire Canoe Kayak Club https://celenire.com/call-for-applications-pointe-claire-canoe-kayak-club/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 21:03:34 +0000 https://celenire.com/call-for-applications-pointe-claire-canoe-kayak-club/ The Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club and the City of Pointe-Claire are looking for volunteer candidates to sit on the Board of Directors for the following period (January 2023 to December 31, 2025). The Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club is a recognized non-profit paramunicipal organization. At the Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club, athletes are at the heart of what we do. […]]]>

The Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club and the City of Pointe-Claire are looking for volunteer candidates to sit on the Board of Directors for the following period (January 2023 to December 31, 2025).

The Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club is a recognized non-profit paramunicipal organization.

At the Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club, athletes are at the heart of what we do. The Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club is committed to developing and promoting a club culture of excellence by:

  • Focus on helping all sprint canoe-kayak athletes grow and achieve their potential.
  • To offer all members programs that are safe, structured and adapted to their level.
  • Create a sense of belonging among all members

The Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Club is recognized in Quebec and Canada for its innovation, leadership and performance, positioning itself through the quality of its coaching and supervision. She is an active member of Canoe Kayak Quebec and Canoe Kayak Canada.

The general mandate of the Club is described as follows:

  • Encourage and promote competitive sprint canoe and kayak activities to residents of Pointe-Claire and the West Island in general.

Without limiting the generality of the preceding paragraph, the Club will fulfill the following roles:

  • Make recommendations to the Pointe-Claire City Council regarding the services offered, the needs and expectations of citizens, as well as future investments to facilitate the fulfillment of the mandate;
  • Manage fundraising events and financial support programs offered to athletes of the Pointe-Claire Canoe-Kayak Team to facilitate their participation in competitions at the regional, provincial, national (Canadian) and international levels, in accordance with any policy or program approved for this purpose by resolution of the municipal council;
  • Provide advice, expertise and recommendations on specific issues arising from the exercise of its general mandate;
  • Provide governance and policy oversight within the framework of its rules and regulations and its agreement with the City of Pointe-Claire.

Applicants with the following experience and availability are encouraged to apply:

  • Have relevant experience in the field of sports or sports management, either voluntary or professional,
  • Have experience in finance, accounting, commerce or marketing,
  • Have experience in the educational, medical or paramedical fields,
  • Have experience in the legal, communication or technical professions,
  • Have other relevant experiences to bring to the table,
  • Be able to work in a team,
  • Be available to actively participate in Club activities.
  • Being a resident of Pointe-Claire will be considered an asset.

Your application must include an up-to-date resume and a cover letter demonstrating your interest in being appointed to the Club’s Board of Directors. Please send your application no later than November 30 to the attention of the Department of Culture, Sports, Recreation and Community Development at récréation@pointe-claire.ca.

Information: 514 630-1300, ext. 1327.

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Nickel is the key to the electric vehicle transition. Is mining making Canadians sick? https://celenire.com/nickel-is-the-key-to-the-electric-vehicle-transition-is-mining-making-canadians-sick/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 19:13:03 +0000 https://celenire.com/nickel-is-the-key-to-the-electric-vehicle-transition-is-mining-making-canadians-sick/ The port district of Limoilou in Quebec, on August 15, 2022. Limoilou is next to the international port of Quebec, where the mined nickel is transported. Growing up in the port district of Limoilou in Quebec City, Joanne Boutet, 65, says she suffered from asthma as a child. Almost everyone in his class did. But […]]]>

The port district of Limoilou in Quebec, on August 15, 2022. Limoilou is next to the international port of Quebec, where the mined nickel is transported.


Growing up in the port district of Limoilou in Quebec City, Joanne Boutet, 65, says she suffered from asthma as a child. Almost everyone in his class did. But when her family moved to Charlesbourg, a more affluent area of ​​the city to the north, she remembers being one of the few to have respiratory problems.

When Ms Boutet returned as an adult, the eczema began to spread across her face and she suffered a severe asthma attack which landed her in hospital. “The first question the doctor asked me was whether I lived in Limoilou,” she recalls. “When I told her I grew up there, she was convinced there was a connection.”

Joanne Boutet, 65, at home in Limoilou. She treats her eczema, which developed when she returned to the area, with cortisone cream.

Limoilou sits next to the international port of Quebec where mined nickel is transported and there are growing concerns among health experts that particles in the air could affect the health of nearby residents.

The provincial government statistics show that atmospheric nickel levels in Limoilou are above average. Between 2018 and 2021, the district exceeded the provincial nickel standard 50 times and reached more than 14 times the maximum limit at least three times last year.

And a government-funded study found that residents of the working-class neighborhood are 1.3 times more likely to have asthma than those at the top of the hill in the Upper Town area of ​​Quebec. They are also 1.5 times more likely to be hospitalized for a respiratory illness.

However, concern over the possible effect of nickel production on people’s health is collided with the industry’s refusal to contribute to poor air quality and the provincial government’s desire to be a leader in providing mineral resources for a green economy. Nickel is a key component in batteries, including for electric cars, and federal and provincial governments are supporting companies to boost mineral production.


Véronique Lalande, former resident of Limoilou and spokesperson for the citizens’ initiative Vigilance du Port de Québec, collected samples of the red dust that covered Limoilou.

Residents suspected there might be trouble, but awareness of contaminated air gained momentum in 2012, when a cloud of red dust from the international port blanketed Limoilou. The dust turned out to be from a pile of uncovered ironblood powder that blew in from the port.

A class action lawsuit was eventually launched and went to court where a Quebec Superior Court judge ruled that residents who found their homes covered in red dust would be compensated for cleaning and mess.

Véronique Lalande, who brought the class action, also suffered from eczema as well as increased allergy symptoms since moving to the neighborhood a few years prior. In 2012, she noticed dust on her balcony and on her newborn baby’s hands one day. “I realized his face was red and he put some in his mouth and I was like, ‘Oh my God.'”

Through dust samples and researching air quality reports, she learned that Limoilou has, on average, the highest atmospheric nickel levels in Canada.

“That’s what really shook people up,” said Ms. Lalande, who also runs a citizen activist group focused on air quality in Limoilou.

Nickel, a metal naturally present in rock deposits, is not considered dangerous, except for people with allergies – the World Health Organization estimates that about 2% of men and 11% of women have a skin reaction to nickel. Ms. Lalande is one of them.

If ingested through the air, nickel can be carcinogenic. “These smaller parts will go deep into the respiratory system, they can go into your blood,” Ms. Lalande said. She was nicknamed the Erin Brockovich of Limoilou. “There is absolutely nothing normal about it.”


Government statistics show that atmospheric nickel levels in Limoilou are above average. Health experts are increasingly concerned that particles in the air could affect residents’ health.

Nickel is used in thousands of everyday products, from Canadian five-cent coins to jewelry, but it has experienced a peak of interest due to its use in electric car batteries. In its 2022 budget, the federal government announced that it was prepared to spend nearly $4 billion to fund the minerals industry essential to electric cars, including nickel.

In Quebec, the largest nickel mine belongs to Glencore, a Swiss multinational. It has been operating out of Raglan since 1997, near the northern tip of the province, and produces 240,000 tonnes of raw material annually, according to the company. Glencore also calls Raglan “one of the purest series of nickel deposits in the world”.

From Raglan, Glencore transports the nickel on its ship to the Port of Quebec where it is unloaded into a sealed storage dome before being transferred to railcars bound for a smelter in Sudbury. At the foundry, it is partly refined and then brought back to the port by rail. From there it is put on another ship bound for a refinery in Norway to be sold as pure nickel.

Maurice Moreau, Glencore Canada’s environmental management systems manager for Ontario and Quebec, at the Glencore facility at the Port of Quebec in Limoilou. He blames the poor air quality elsewhere: wood stoves, the municipal incinerator and pollution from cars, among other sources.


During a port visit, Glencore’s environmental systems manager for Quebec and Ontario said the company was not responsible for the release of nickel into the air at Limoilou. “Nickel is of great value to us. This is where we make our profit. We don’t want to lose any nickel in the air,” said Moe Moreau.

Mr. Moreau said that Glencore, which recorded a record $18.9 billion in profits in the first half of 2022, has spent $60 million over the past decade to improve its atmospheric nickel capture mechanisms. Some of these improvements include updating its unloading machine to operate on one lane to reduce unloading by 36 hours when the ship is open and the nickel is exposed to the air. Glencore has also added sealed doors instead of shutters to the building, where railcars are filled, and installed dry fog machines to spray nickel onto the ship, turning stray dust into water molecules that fall back onto the pile.

Glencore, which was simultaneously involved in air quality controversy on its Horne smelter in Rouyn-Noranda, Que., which emitted high levels of arsenic for decades, leading to high rates of lung cancer, will not release air quality statistics recorded at the port. Mr. Moreau says that “nickel does not come from the mining industry. He blames Limoilou’s wood stoves, the salt that accumulates after snow removal, the municipal incinerator, the paper mill and automobile pollution.


A study found that residents of Limoilou are 1.3 times more likely to suffer from asthma and 1.5 times more likely to be hospitalized for a respiratory illness, compared to those in the hills of Upper Town Quebec. .

In 2013, a Quebecer Study by the Ministry of the Environment concluded that it is “very unlikely” that the nickel in the Limoilou air comes from anywhere other than the port. He also discovered that nickel contained an iron sulfide called pentlandite – a potentially more dangerous form of the metal. In Western Australia, where pentlandite is found, standards are much stricter than they are in Canada.

“Here, we’re talking about apples and bananas,” said Claudel Pétrin-Desrosiers, who heads the Quebec chapter of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment (AQME). “Nickel found in Europe and Ontario is relatively benign, I mean it can cause respiratory problems but it’s not as carcinogenic as the others. The one we have in Quebec is the one most likely to cause cancer if there is high long-term exposure.

A petition signed by 18 Quebec health ministries including AQME called on the government to investigate the effects of atmospheric nickel and reverse its February Decision to relax the provincial nickel standard – a move Glencore lobbied for since 2013.

“We have an industry that does not pay the price for what it pollutes. They literally ask for more, and the government says yes, and then who suffers? It is the people of the city who are the least heard, ”said Pétrin-Desrosiers.

In an email, the Quebec Ministry of the Environment defended its decision, citing a 2018 report led by Michèle Bouchard, holder of the chair of toxicological risk analysis and management at the University of Montreal.

“The application of an annual standard[…]prevents associated critical respiratory effects with repeated exposure to nickel and protects against the carcinogenic effects of all nickel compounds, including nickel sulphides.

Speaking to journalists In February, Quebec Environment Minister Benoit Charette said the decision to relax nickel air quality standards was made in response to increased demand for electric car batteries. “I have a very clear mandate to fight climate change, to significantly reduce our greenhouse gas emissions,” he said. “We need to electrify our transport, and for that we need nickel.”


More than 100 residents created a mural to illustrate the community’s frustration with the poor air quality in Limoilou.

In Limoilou, there is a mural of a person wearing a gas mask standing with an umbrella below imagery of a skull and bones, bombs and lightning. The artwork was made with the participation of over 100 local residents to demonstrate the community’s frustration.

“We no longer want Limoilou to be a sacrificial zone,” said Raymond Poirier, president of the Volunteer Citizen Council of Vieux-Limoilou. “In French we say, ‘often not in my backyard‘ (not in my garden), but I feel like it’s still in our garden.

Raymond Poirier, president of the Citizen Council of Vieux-Limoilou.

Ms. Lalande left the neighborhood in 2016 for a house in the mountains where she lives on the corner of a street called Bon Air. Back in Limoilou, where she still works, Ms. Lalande indicates the park she used to take her children. “It’s really still very emotional because I didn’t choose to leave,” she said.

While Limoilou awaits several government studies on air quality, including a report from an independent task force expected to arrive by the end of the year, she says the goal is not to hunt Glencore or the region’s port. “We can collectively be richer from our resources, but they can do it the right way by protecting the people,” she said.

If that happens, she hopes to return to her beloved Limoilou.

“I believe it’s a matter of time,” she said.


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The eviction of people living under the Ville-Marie highway in Montreal postponed https://celenire.com/the-eviction-of-people-living-under-the-ville-marie-highway-in-montreal-postponed/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 20:45:36 +0000 https://celenire.com/the-eviction-of-people-living-under-the-ville-marie-highway-in-montreal-postponed/ Quebec’s Department of Transportation has announced it is postponing the eviction of people living under the Ville-Marie highway in Montreal until it can help relocate them. To clear the way for maintenance work, the ministry gave people residing under the freeway about two weeks’ notice to vacate the area by Thursday. Following community outcry, the […]]]>

Quebec’s Department of Transportation has announced it is postponing the eviction of people living under the Ville-Marie highway in Montreal until it can help relocate them.

To clear the way for maintenance work, the ministry gave people residing under the freeway about two weeks’ notice to vacate the area by Thursday.

Following community outcry, the department suspended the eviction notice on Wednesday with no new deadline for leaving.

“We want to give them time to find alternatives that will meet their real needs,” said Ministry spokeswoman Sarah Bensadoun.

“The fact is that the Department of Transport and Mobility has no expertise on the housing system or housing companies.”

The Ministry of Transportation will work with the city of Montreal, the Ministry of Social Services and community organizations like Diogène, Dialogue and EMIS, Bensadoun said.

When people heard the news that the eviction was on hold, they ran from tent to tent, sticking together and celebrating.

“If you look at their postures here today compared to yesterday, you can see a distinctive difference – there is an air of relief and definite celebration,” said David Chapman, executive director of the Resilience Montreal shelter.

People had been coming to Resilience Montreal daily since they received the eviction notice and had nowhere to go, Chapman said. He is skeptical of the city‘s ability to properly care for those who will be evicted from the encampment as no clear commitment has been made to move forward.

“Unfortunately there is still a strong sense of paternalism,” Chapman said. “The idea of ​​really listening to people and hearing what they need and actually responding in accordance with what they say is still surprisingly rare.”

With long waiting lists for social housing, overwhelmed shelters with strict rules around substance use and pets, an increase in homelessness and the approach of winter, people living under highway are already in “survival camp,” Resilience Montreal said in a statement. Release.

“[The MTQ] will definitely need a better plan,” said Chapman, who will consult with people living in the encampment on what they need to move forward.

The area under the freeway was turned into a construction site in mid-September and work on six main arteries of Route 136, which Bensadoun said “cannot be delayed”, is expected to continue until 2025.

“It is a site that belongs to the Ministry of Transport, so it is private property and a property that is not suitable for any type of habitation,” Bensadoun said.

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This Old Thing: The bridal bracelet has a smart display https://celenire.com/this-old-thing-the-bridal-bracelet-has-a-smart-display/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 19:07:48 +0000 https://celenire.com/this-old-thing-the-bridal-bracelet-has-a-smart-display/ Q This unusual spinning silver bracelet features two miniature paintings and comes with an original case marked “Savage, Lyman & Co., Jewelers & C. Cathedral Block, Notre Dame Street, Montreal.” The cameos depict relatives—a reverend and his wife—whose church was in Clarenceville, Quebec, near Montreal. The couple’s son, a businessman involved in North American heavy […]]]>

Q This unusual spinning silver bracelet features two miniature paintings and comes with an original case marked “Savage, Lyman & Co., Jewelers & C. Cathedral Block, Notre Dame Street, Montreal.” The cameos depict relatives—a reverend and his wife—whose church was in Clarenceville, Quebec, near Montreal. The couple’s son, a businessman involved in North American heavy industry and the cotton trade, had two daughters who lived in England, and we believe my mother inherited the bracelet from those cousins. I would like to know who had the bracelet made and where.

A. I consulted jewelry specialist Don McLean of Toronto’s Waddington Auction House. He identified this unusual silver example (most were gold or gold-plated) as a typical 1860s style. The finely textured wire is applied entirely by hand. We can date the bracelet between 1868 and 1878 – the dates of the company’s operation. The detailed cameos could be priced separately at around $200 each. Better to leave it in a bundle, it will have no trouble ordering $1,000 or more.

Q While dealing with my parents’ estate and personal effects, I discovered this bowl in a dresser. I have no idea where they got it from. It has a shimmering color inside and out and is quite striking. The glass is very thin on the outer edge, and on the underside there are etched markings, including the initials “LC T”. It measures approximately 23 cm in diameter (9 inches). Can you tell me something about it and its value?

Tiffany bowl

A. Fabulous find. You have an original work of the famous artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Working from the late 1800s until around the 1930s, Tiffany also reflected Art Nouveau tastes as in your fluted bowl, which is a true example of its famous Favrile (handmade) glass. It also has a special iridescent finish. The exterior design resembles waves. A contestant named Durand used the same design and called it “King Tut”. Tiffany items are desirable today, and the immaculate design and good condition will cost $2,000 or more on the open market.

Q This is a table or shelf that I “saved” from the trash. It measures 66 cm long by 38 cm wide and 61 cm high (26 x 15 x 24 inches). It bears the words “Canadian provincial furniture, Old Canadian”. I have since done it again. I would appreciate knowing what it was used for and where it came from. Thanks.

Bucket bench

A. With the peeling paint, it looks like a bucket bench from the early 1850s. However, what you have is a side table made by Quebec furniture company Vieux Canadien, which specialized in making furniture in the tastes of yesteryear, what could be called a “century-old” piece or a reproduction likely made in the 1950s. burst of the old days of the inhabitants of Quebec”, which were offered with various finishes. Your bench was selling for $41.50 at the time. Believe it or not, with the peeling paint, it was probably worth $200. Refined, and with the interesting story, it will still be worth $125.

John Sewell is an appraiser of antiques and works of art. To submit an article to his column, go to the ‘Contact John’ page at www.johnsewellantiques.ca. Please measure your part, say when and how you got it, what you paid for, and list all identifying marks. A high resolution jpeg photo must also be included. (Only email submissions are accepted.) *Assessment values ​​are estimates only.*

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Fight against the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system in Quebec https://celenire.com/fight-against-the-overrepresentation-of-aboriginal-people-in-the-criminal-justice-system-in-quebec/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 15:08:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/fight-against-the-overrepresentation-of-aboriginal-people-in-the-criminal-justice-system-in-quebec/ THE HATQC , November 2, 2022 /CNW/ – Advancing reconciliation requires supporting culturally appropriate, Indigenous-led, community-based justice services. This is a key element in achieving systemic change in our justice system. Today, the Honorable David Lametti, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canadathe honorable François-Philip ChampagneMinister of Innovation, Science and Industry, and Member of […]]]>

THE HATQC , November 2, 2022 /CNW/ – Advancing reconciliation requires supporting culturally appropriate, Indigenous-led, community-based justice services. This is a key element in achieving systemic change in our justice system.

Today, the Honorable David Lametti, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canadathe honorable François-Philip ChampagneMinister of Innovation, Science and Industry, and Member of Parliament for Saint-Maurice–Champlain, and Grand Chief Constant Awashish of the Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw announced funding to address the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the criminal justice system and provide community justice services to the Aboriginal peoples of Quebec.

The Atikamekw Community Justice Program (PJCA) offers a variety of justice services to meet the specific needs of the Atikamekw Nation in Wemotaci and Manawan, Quebec. These include services in the areas of family mediation, victim support, prevention, diversion and reintegration. By providing culturally appropriate community justice services, including Gladue aftercare services, the PJCA helps reduce the risk of recidivism in the community as well as the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system in Quebec.

Justice Canada provides $908,750 over five years through the Aboriginal Justice Program at the Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw to support their efforts to address the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system. This includes:

  • Community Justice Program (PJCA): $537,500 over five years for the continued delivery of community justice services under the PJCA, and a $181,250 over three years in program integrity funding to support increased demand for these services in the community
  • Gladue tracking services provided through the PJCA: $190,000 over three years to support the delivery of Gladue Aftercare services, to help individuals reintegrate into their communities in a safe and culturally appropriate manner

Addressing the systemic factors that contribute to the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples, as well as systemic racism in the justice system, is part of from Canada commitments set out in the Federal Path to Addressing Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ People. Today’s announcement also supports from Canada efforts to advance reconciliation in Canada and responding to calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

Quotation

“Thanks to his efforts over several years within the framework of the Atikamekw Restorative Justice Program, the Atikamekw Nation is considered a model in the field of restorative justice. Our methods aim not only to bring justice to the victims but also to prevent the perpetrators from reoffending and to limit the intervention of criminal justice. The work is not easy and, for this reason, I am happy to see the expertise of the Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw recognized as well as the high quality of the Atikamekw Onikam social service providers. Let’s continue on the right track.”

Grand Chief and President Constant Awashish
Atikamekw Nation Council

“Indigenous peoples are alarmingly overrepresented in from Canada criminal justice system. By supporting Indigenous justice services, like Gladue Aftercare, we are helping to bring about systemic change to address this unacceptable reality. These investments will support our efforts to address systemic discrimination against Indigenous peoples and improve access to justice and fairness in our justice system. »

The Honorable David Lametti, PC, QC, MP
Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

“Collaboration and partnership with Indigenous organizations is essential to advancing reconciliation and transforming the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the justice system. The Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw is an essential partner in these efforts and in the creation of healthier, more dynamic and safer communities in Quebec.

The Honorable François-Philip Champagne
Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry and MNA for Saint-Maurice–Champlain

Fast facts

  • The Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw (CNA) is the official representative of the Atikamekw Nation on the regional, national and international scene. The CNA defends and promotes the social, economic and cultural rights and interests of the Atikamekw Nation and ensures the delivery of programs and services at the community level.
  • To help reduce the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the criminal justice system, the Government of from Canada Fall Economic Statement 2020 invested $49.3 million support the implementation of the Gladue principles in the justice system through Canada, as well as Indigenous-led responses. Support to the Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw for the delivery of Gladue aftercare services through the PJCA is part of this investment.
  • Implementing the Gladue Principles in the justice system responds to Calls to Action 30, 31 and 38 of the TRC and calls from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls to Justice 5.11, 5.15 and 5.16.
  • Justice Canada Indigenous Justice Program (IJP) supports Indigenous community justice programs that provide alternatives to conventional justice processes in appropriate circumstances. The objectives of the program are:
    • help Indigenous peoples assume greater responsibility for the administration of justice in their communities;
    • reflect and include Aboriginal values ​​in the justice system; and,
    • contribute to a decrease in the rate of victimization, crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities with community justice programs funded by the IJP.

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SOURCE Department of Justice Canada

For further information: For further information, media may contact: Chantalle Aubertin, Press Secretary, Office of the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, (613) 992-6568, [email protected]; Media Relations, Department of Justice Canada, 613-957-4207, [email protected]; Réjean Nequado, Communications Coordinator, Atikamekw Nation Council, 819-676-7139, [email protected]

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The Francophone community will promote the NWT at events in France and Morocco https://celenire.com/the-francophone-community-will-promote-the-nwt-at-events-in-france-and-morocco/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 13:32:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/the-francophone-community-will-promote-the-nwt-at-events-in-france-and-morocco/ Representatives of the Francophone community of Yellowknife will travel to France and Morocco in November to encourage immigration to the NWT. “The idea is that Canadian provinces and territories go to French-speaking regions and try to attract a qualified bilingual workforce to settle in this territory,” explained François Afane, director general of the Conseil de […]]]>

Representatives of the Francophone community of Yellowknife will travel to France and Morocco in November to encourage immigration to the NWT.

“The idea is that Canadian provinces and territories go to French-speaking regions and try to attract a qualified bilingual workforce to settle in this territory,” explained François Afane, director general of the Conseil de développement economic system of the Northwest Territories (CDÉTNO ).

Nearly 4,000 potential job candidates are expected to attend the two Destination Canada Mobility Forums, which will be hosted by the Embassy of Canada to France in Paris and Rabat, Morocco, in late November.

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During the forum, CDÉTNO will promote NWT jobs on behalf of employers. So far, they bring with them job offers for hospitality and tourism, as well as jobs in administration and construction, to share with attendees.

CDETNO has encouraged other NWT employers who would like their job postings shared – free of charge – at the forum to contact them at jobs@cdetno.com.

“We know there is a labor shortage and everyone is collapsing,” Afane said.

“The more vacancies we have, the more interest we will generate from candidates and the more we will be able to attract people in as many fields as possible.”

Reflection on the continuing healthcare workforce crisis in the Northwest Territories, Afane said, “We’re definitely going to start looking at how to attract people from the health industry.

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“We know there is a lot of paperwork and challenges to go through this process [of working in health care in another country] but that doesn’t discourage us or prevent us from at least trying to convince people to come over here and maybe go through the process.

Afane said that on average, about four to five people move to the Northwest Territories for work after attending the forum each year.

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“For example, we have a firefighter who works for the city of Yellowknife who we convinced to move to Yellowknife through Destination Canada. We have engineers, and we have communications and marketing people,” he said.

This will be the sixteenth time that the CDÉTNO has participated in the annual forum, but the first time that the Fédération franco-ténoise – Le Réseau en immigration francophone des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (FFT – RIFTNO) has received funding to participate.

Abby Schelew, RIFTNO Coordinator, will promote the Francophone services available in the NWT and explain to participants what it is like to live in the territory.

She believes that sharing her personal experience of moving to the NWT will help encourage others to do the same.

“I came here to live my life in French and be part of the French community and it’s certainly fulfilling for me,” she says.

“I’m really passionate about the Northwest Territories and can’t wait to tell people about the kinds of adventures they can have here. It’s such a curious place, I think I can communicate it well and with a lot of enthusiasm.

Schelew also encouraged local organizations with settlement information for Francophone immigrants to contact her at cfa_riftno@franco-nord.com, as she compiles resources into a virtual kiosk that applicants can access online.

“Quebec is very attractive, but we hope it will bring new people [to the Northwest Territories],” she says.

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A Quebec man subdued after allegedly shooting at gendarmes outside the ambulance station in Trail, British Columbia https://celenire.com/a-quebec-man-subdued-after-allegedly-shooting-at-gendarmes-outside-the-ambulance-station-in-trail-british-columbia/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 01:17:57 +0000 https://celenire.com/a-quebec-man-subdued-after-allegedly-shooting-at-gendarmes-outside-the-ambulance-station-in-trail-british-columbia/ Police in Trail, British Columbia, are recommending attempted murder charges against a Quebec man who allegedly shot them after he claimed he tried to enter an ambulance station. The incident took place just before midnight at the ambulance station on Hospital Bench Road in the community of West Kootenay. Trail and Greater District RCMP say […]]]>

Police in Trail, British Columbia, are recommending attempted murder charges against a Quebec man who allegedly shot them after he claimed he tried to enter an ambulance station.

The incident took place just before midnight at the ambulance station on Hospital Bench Road in the community of West Kootenay.

Trail and Greater District RCMP say officers were called to the facility, where they located the man who was “behaving erratically” and “standing in a dark area.”

“As officers engaged in a verbal de-escalation with the man, he allegedly fired multiple shots with a handgun at the two officers and three nearby paramedics,” police said in a news release.

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“Officers used a conducted energy weapon to physically subdue the man. Officers took the man into custody without further incident. No one was injured during this event.

Police said the 39-year-old suspect remains in custody pending multiple firearms charges and is due in court next Wednesday.


Click to play video: “Active Shooter Targets Vanderhoof RCMP Detachment”


Active shooter targets Vanderhoof RCMP Detachment


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Nancy Tips: State Senator Anthony Pollina and the Politics of Devastation https://celenire.com/nancy-tips-state-senator-anthony-pollina-and-the-politics-of-devastation/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 11:07:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/nancy-tips-state-senator-anthony-pollina-and-the-politics-of-devastation/ This comment is from Windham resident Nancy Tips. Ooooh. Not yet. Outgoing State Senator Anthony Pollina, in his recent opinion piece, attempts to revive the old trope that opponents of industrial wind power in Vermont don’t want wind turbines because of the possibility of these machines spoiling their beautiful and expensive views. In part, this […]]]>

This comment is from Windham resident Nancy Tips.

Ooooh. Not yet. Outgoing State Senator Anthony Pollina, in his recent opinion piece, attempts to revive the old trope that opponents of industrial wind power in Vermont don’t want wind turbines because of the possibility of these machines spoiling their beautiful and expensive views.

In part, this misconception can be attributed to Governor Phil Scott, whom I hold in the highest regard. Governor Scott is a great guy, except for one small thing: he seems to believe that the potential for a spoiled view is the big issue driving Vermont’s powerful opposition to industrial wind power.

This is not the case. No indeed. Most opponents of industrial wind power that I know do not think about their point of view. Instead, we denounce the environmental devastation of wind turbine installations on sensitive and pristine ridgelines, the destruction of communities by the wind industry’s ruthless divisive tactics, and the unfairness of efforts to install wind turbines. very close to the homes of the real Vermonters. Among several other problems.

I admit I was surprised by Anthony’s list of the devastating effects of Hydro-Quebec, with which he hopes to guilt the good-hearted people who drive electric cars in Vermont. But I note that of course the terrible impacts he cites are only devastating in Canada, but only catastrophic when the wind industry brings them to Vermont.

It might be instructive to take a close look at his list of various Hydro-Quebec sins and see the possibility that those sins could also be pretty nasty if they showed up in his utopian wind-powered Vermont:

  • “Changing the course of rivers”: Hmmm, that sounds pretty bad, okay, and it happens to be a pretty likely possibility for us here in the flood-prone hills, especially given the huge impermeable area which must be created for a “profitable” (read “large”) wind installation in this difficult terrain.
  • “Flood an area the size of New York State”: Well, that’s a bit of a stretch, but flooding remains the #1 potential natural disaster for us in fragile hill towns, given the proliferation of watercourses and their propensity to turn into raging torrents, under a good regular shower (see the first point above). The transformation of the ridges into vast concrete fields with wide access roads is a recipe for disaster in these hills. On this subject, Anthony might want to check the experiments near the industrial wind farm at Lowell, if he remains in doubt on this subject.
  • “Displacing Thousands of Natives”: No good, no doubt about it. But I wonder if Anthony cares to displace Vermont residents who have bought homes we thought were safe, and now find we are being illegally taken, without compensation, by a ruthless wind industry that is free to ignore. collateral damage (i.e. us)? You might want to talk to real Vermonters, Anthony, turbine neighbors whose names are easy to come by and whose lives have been badly affected by their proximity to the noise, vibration and flicker of shadows.
  • “Raise mercury levels in fish”: Dang, nobody wants that. But while Anthony laments the environmental poisoning resulting from energy production, I wish he would shed a few tears for the damage caused by the rapacious and toxic mining of heavy metals needed to build the turbines. And I’d be really interested to hear how he decides which environmental degradation is an acceptable collateral cost, and which isn’t.
  • “Emitting greenhouse gases”: Golly is terrible. But what about the huge expenditure on fossil fuels required by the extraction and production of raw materials, the transport, assembly, maintenance, dismantling and disposal of wind turbines, as well as the use of fossil fuels as backup when the wind is not blowing?
  • And of course, my favorite: “Forever changing the land, the ecosystem and the culture.” I couldn’t have said it better, Anthony. This is exactly what has happened and would continue to happen in Vermont communities with the arrival of so-called “wind farms”.

And by the way, no carp, but Anthony’s closure is wrong. There is a large wind turbine proposed for Vermont, in Stamford, a 2.2 MW proposal by Norwich Solar Technologies. We warriors of the wind cannot afford to rest on our laurels.

It would be really nice if Anthony Pollina’s point of view was really ‘progressive’ and not meaningless ‘green’.

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