Quebec City – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 16:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec City – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 Sudbury Steelworkers support nickel supply deal between Vale and GM https://celenire.com/sudbury-steelworkers-support-nickel-supply-deal-between-vale-and-gm/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/sudbury-steelworkers-support-nickel-supply-deal-between-vale-and-gm/ Nickel mined in Canada will go into General Motors electric vehicles from 2026 The nickel sulphate supply agreement reached last week between Vale and General Motors (GM) is being welcomed by the United Steelworkers (USW) union in Sudbury. USW 6500 issued a press release supporting the signing of a term sheet that will see nickel […]]]>

Nickel mined in Canada will go into General Motors electric vehicles from 2026

The nickel sulphate supply agreement reached last week between Vale and General Motors (GM) is being welcomed by the United Steelworkers (USW) union in Sudbury.

USW 6500 issued a press release supporting the signing of a term sheet that will see nickel mined from Canadian operations in Sudbury, Voisey’s Bay, NL and Thompson, Man. will head towards Vale’s proposed nickel processing plant in Bécancour, Quebec.

“Steelworkers are essential members of the communities in which we live. As a union, we strive to support and give back to our communities and that is made possible when our jobs are supported,” Nick Larochelle, President of Steelworkers Local 6500, said in the statement. . Local 6500 represents 2,700 mine, mill and smelter workers in Sudbury.

“I am delighted that this contract between Vale and General Motors supports and protects good local union jobs while creating new jobs at the same time. I am confident that our members are up to the challenge and will rise to the challenge,” added Myles Sullivan, District 6 Director (Ontario and Atlantic Canada) in a statement.

Under the terms of the agreement, Vale will supply 25,000 tons of battery-grade nickel sulfate per year for use in GM’s Ultium battery cathodes, which will go into electric vehicles like the Chevrolet Silverado, Blazer, Equinox, Cadillac LYRIQ , GMC Sierra and the GMC Hummer and SUV, according to GM’s press release last week. This amount of nickel will power approximately 350,000 electric vehicles per year.

Deliveries are expected to begin in the second half of 2026, according to GM.

Nickel is one of the critical metals used in the manufacture of batteries for electric vehicles.

The GM-Vale supply deal is part of a growing North American movement of ‘offshoring’ by automakers and battery makers to secure domestic supply chains, sometimes striking off-take deals directly with mining companies. Rock Tech Lithium, owner of a lithium mine project in northwestern Ontario, entered into a supply agreement with Mercedes-Benz last summer.

Bécancour, a town of about 12,800 between Montreal and Quebec, calls itself “Lithium Battery Valley” with its growing industrial park aimed at supplying automakers with the advanced materials needed for electric vehicles.

The Brazilian company Vale SA announced in June its intention to build a nickel sulphate plant there which would produce 25,000 tonnes of the treated material needed to manufacture nickel-based lithium-ion batteries.

Electra Battery Materials could join them in Bécancour. The Toronto company, which is renovating and expanding a refinery in Temiskaming to start cobalt production next spring, is considering setting up a second refinery in Bécancour at the invitation of the Quebec government.

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Jean Lapointe, singer, actor and retired Canadian senator, dies at 86 https://celenire.com/jean-lapointe-singer-actor-and-retired-canadian-senator-dies-at-86/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 22:57:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/jean-lapointe-singer-actor-and-retired-canadian-senator-dies-at-86/ Jean Lapointe, the beloved Quebec singer, actor and comedian who was later appointed to the Senate, has died at the age of 86. The foundation he created announced on Friday his death from health complications in a palliative care home in Montreal, surrounded by his loved ones. Born in Price, a village in Bas-Saint-Laurent, Lapointe […]]]>

Jean Lapointe, the beloved Quebec singer, actor and comedian who was later appointed to the Senate, has died at the age of 86.

The foundation he created announced on Friday his death from health complications in a palliative care home in Montreal, surrounded by his loved ones.

Born in Price, a village in Bas-Saint-Laurent, Lapointe began his career as a teenager on Quebec radio.

In 1955, he founded the Jérolas with Jérôme Lemay.

The popular duo mixed music, humor and impersonations, leading them to performances on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1963 and at the famous Olympia in Paris.

The Jérolas separated in 1974 when Lapointe and Lemay embarked on a solo career.

Lapointe was successful on his own in music as well as comedy throughout the 1970s and 1980s, stringing together hits such as sing your song, You juggle my life and If we sang together.

In 1981, he won the Félix, Quebec music prize, for concert of the year.

He was also a gifted actor and had a film career alongside his other feats, starting with Jul 871 alongside Lemay in 1966. Her role in the 2004 film The last tunnel by Érik Canuel won a Genie award and a Jutra award the same year.

In 2000, the Quebec humor awards gala Les Olivier awarded him a tribute prize. Another tribute was paid to him at the Just for Laughs gala in 2005, marking his 50th anniversary with the company.

Jérôme Lemay, on the left, and Jean Lapointe, on the right, formed the Jérolas from 1955 to 1974. (Radio-Canada)

Lapointe was appointed to the Senate in 2001 by former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, serving as a Liberal until his retirement at age 75 in 2010. Lapointe received many honors during his life, including his appointment to the Order of Canada in 1984 and his appointment as an officer. of the National Order of Quebec in 2006.

Lapointe struggled with alcoholism in the 1960s but managed to pull through, and in 1982 he established a halfway house for people struggling with alcoholism and drug addiction, La Maison Jean Lapointe. Last month, the foundation and treatment center celebrated their 40th anniversary.

“Our father has always said that his greatest pride has always been Maison Jean Lapointe,” his daughter Anne Elizabeth Lapointe, the treatment center’s general manager, said in a statement.

“His departure saddens us, but we know that he will remain the soul of our establishment.”

Lapointe is survived by his wife, Mercedes, and his seven children, two grandsons and two sisters.

“The loss of our father is a terrible ordeal, but knowing that his artistic and humanist legacy will live on in the hearts of Quebecers comforts us,” said his son Jean-Marie Lapointe in a press release.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau released a statement saying Lapointe’s legacy will be remembered for generations and will be remembered for “his many contributions to the Canadian artistic community, his philanthropy and his service to Canadians in as a former senator.

“His performances were ahead of their time, filled with his signature wit and good-natured humor,” Trudeau said.

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What happens in the water https://celenire.com/what-happens-in-the-water/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 09:03:13 +0000 https://celenire.com/what-happens-in-the-water/ The Grater vessel and its crew studying the river were built in 2004 and designed by scientists from the University of Quebec at Trois-Rivières (UQTR). The Lampsilis is modeled after a catamaran, with two aluminum hulls that sit barely a meter underwater to navigate the shallow waters of the St. Lawrence. After meeting Grater at […]]]>

The Grater vessel and its crew studying the river were built in 2004 and designed by scientists from the University of Quebec at Trois-Rivières (UQTR). The Lampsilis is modeled after a catamaran, with two aluminum hulls that sit barely a meter underwater to navigate the shallow waters of the St. Lawrence.

After meeting Grater at Florida State University, Guillemette recruited her in 2017 to help revive the Lampsilis and make research on the ship more collaborative.

Prior to this, the ship had sat idle in a warehouse for four years due to a lack of funding.

Guillemette says research on the Lampsilis in the past, like on similar vessels, was done in silos. Scientists would present a specific research question — say, about a contaminant in fish — they would go on a trip with the boat to collect samples, type up a study, “and that’s it,” he said.

This year, the boat has entered a new era as Guillemette has handed over command and planning to Grater, who has just completed his Masters, as Head of Mission. The other five scientists on board to Quebec were undergraduate and graduate students.

Guillemette says he encourages students to join these missions in order to immerse themselves in the environment they are studying. “You can read about a system all you want, but you’ll never understand it until you see it,” he said.

The ship itself embodies how the river has changed. His name has two meanings. On the one hand, it refers to a species of freshwater mussel, the lampilis, whose population in the St. Lawrence and other Canadian rivers has been decimated due to competition for food with zebra mussels. invasive.

The species has since rebounded and been upgraded from an endangered species to a Federally Special Concern species.

It is also the name of a lake that existed 10,000 years ago, around the time of the formation of the St. Lawrence River, when the ice covering North America melted.

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“You are no longer safe”: Laval students, parents shaken after a shooting near the CEGEP https://celenire.com/you-are-no-longer-safe-laval-students-parents-shaken-after-a-shooting-near-the-cegep/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 21:09:23 +0000 https://celenire.com/you-are-no-longer-safe-laval-students-parents-shaken-after-a-shooting-near-the-cegep/ Jean-Michel Duquette, a third-year psychology student at College Montmorency in Laval, Que., says he was standing near the front door of his school on Friday when suddenly he saw people running. “I was like, ‘Oh my God, what’s going on?'” he said. Duquette was one of hundreds of students on campus when a shooting occurred […]]]>

Jean-Michel Duquette, a third-year psychology student at College Montmorency in Laval, Que., says he was standing near the front door of his school on Friday when suddenly he saw people running.

“I was like, ‘Oh my God, what’s going on?'” he said.

Duquette was one of hundreds of students on campus when a shooting occurred in a park near the school in the Chomedey neighborhood, leaving three people in hospital with gunshot wounds that did not put their lives in danger and a fourth with injuries believed to be due to broken glass.

After the victims took refuge inside the school, the campus was locked down, confining hundreds of staff and students.

“I started running with my friend, just to try and see what was going on…because we’re at school and someone’s bleeding, so we’re trying to help them,” Duquette says.

People inside the school were slowly evacuated from the building shortly after 10 p.m. – more than four hours after the lockdown came into effect.

While police say there was no danger to those confined on campus, Duquette says the incident left students feeling unsafe.

“If they can do this stuff in a school, it becomes dangerous. Like you’re not safe anymore. The city has to do something,” he said.

Police say there were four casualties in Friday’s incident, three of whom were shot and one was treated for a possible glass-related injury. (Kolya Hubacek-Guilbault/Radio-Canada)

Police said no shots were fired on campus and they could not say whether the victims were students at the school.

However, this does not reassure Jean-Jacques Nduita much.

“When I hear something like this, I get worried as a parent,” said Nduita, whose daughter comes to school every Saturday for a swimming lesson.

He says he wants the city to crack down on the use of guns to make the neighborhood safe.

Shooting linked to street gang, police chief says

Laval Mayor Stephane Boyer and local police chief Pierre Brochet held a press conference Saturday morning to provide an update on Friday’s incident.

Brochet says police are still looking for the suspect or suspects in the shooting and are asking for the public’s help.

He confirmed that a victim aged between 19 and 20 was involved with a local street gang known as the Flamehead Boys, but did not provide further details.

“It’s important to clarify, the event has no connection with CEGEP,” he said, adding that he also has no connection with another school lockdown that happened earlier on Friday at another CEGEP in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Que.

Laval Police Chief Pierre Brochet said a victim between the ages of 19 and 20 was involved with a local street gang known as the Flamehead Boys, but did not provide further details. (Kwabena Oduro/CBC News)

Brochet says the city has seen shootings drop by half this year compared to last year thanks to a policing project launched last spring, “but what we’re seeing now with the events that happened yesterday, we’ve there is still work to do.”

Referring to gang violence in the city, Brochet says officers will continue to crack down.

“Until these actions, which have no respect for human life, stop, we will not let go and we will be on their backs,” he said.

The mayor asks for more support for Laval

At the same press conference on Saturday, Mayor Boyer told reporters he had spoken with Quebec Public Safety Minister Francois Bonnardel to request more funding to help address gun violence in the city. .

“The fact that we have seen many and many more events in recent years involving young people, more [firearms]even if we invest a lot of money… I was asking for financial support from the provincial government, just as Montreal received it,” said Stéphane Boyer, referring to the $250 million for Montreal during the summer.

Laval Mayor Stéphane Boyer is asking the Quebec government for more financial support to fight gun violence in Laval, saying the city must have the wherewithal to invest more in community action to tackle the problem at hand. the root. (Kwabena Oduro/CBC News)

Boyer says the city has already added $1.2 million to the police budget this year to allow more investigators to investigate street gangs and weapons offenses, but he says the city needs to have the means to invest more in community outreach to tackle the problem at its roots.

“Beyond the police, we must give our young people the means to get involved, to develop their sense of belonging, of pride. We must give them other opportunities than going to organized crime”, he said.

Boyer and Brochet both say that despite what happened on Friday, the city is safe and they are working hard to curb the violence.

“I want to reassure people that we are doing everything we can to fight street gangs,” Boyer said.

Brochet says he wants to send the message that the area is “very safe around the college.”

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An Aboriginal Quebecer living on a reserve is denied insurance https://celenire.com/an-aboriginal-quebecer-living-on-a-reserve-is-denied-insurance/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 13:59:05 +0000 https://celenire.com/an-aboriginal-quebecer-living-on-a-reserve-is-denied-insurance/ MONTREAL — A Native A Quebec man who was denied car insurance because he lived on a reserve was the victim of racial discrimination, the province’s human rights commission found in a recent ruling. Alexis Wawanoloath, a lawyer and former Parti Québécois member of the Legislative Assembly, told a news conference Thursday that he welcomed […]]]>

MONTREAL — A Native A Quebec man who was denied car insurance because he lived on a reserve was the victim of racial discrimination, the province’s human rights commission found in a recent ruling.

Alexis Wawanoloath, a lawyer and former Parti Québécois member of the Legislative Assembly, told a news conference Thursday that he welcomed the decision stemming from a complaint four years ago, but the called it a partial victory because the decision failed to take into account the systemic nature of the situation.

“Yes, I experienced discrimination, but since I knew it had been experienced by many other people, I wanted the commission to look into the systemic problem,” Wawanoloath said at the offices of the Center for action research on race relations, which helped him with his complaint.

Wawanoloath, 40, filed a complaint in October 2018 after being refused an auto insurance quote because of his postal code in Odanak, about 120 kilometers northeast of Montreal.

He said the minute he gave the zip code, the woman on the other end of the line said they couldn’t insure it because the address was on reserve.

The commission issued a ruling last month that found Industrial Alliance Insurance Company guilty of racial discrimination against Wawanoloath, a member of the W8banakiak First Nation.

The commission ordered the Quebec insurance company to pay Wawanoloath $20,000 in moral and punitive damages. He also said the company must ensure that any exclusions of geographic regions are based on “verified and verifiable elements” applied equally between Native and no-Native communities.

Wawanoloath noted that his complaint was originally dismissed in 2020 by a human rights commission investigator who he discovered through a quick internet search was also working in the insurance industry. He complained of a conflict of interest and the investigation was reopened with another investigator.

Wawanoloath, the first Native elected to the Legislative Assembly of Quebec in 2007, said the experience with the company made him sad, angry and confused, especially after being elected and working to get a law degree.

“When I (started) in politics in Quebec, I tried to be a kind of bridge between nations, and after all that, I am always refused because of where I live without further explanation” , did he declare.

In a statement, iA Auto and Home Insurance said it once again apologized to Wawanoloath for information provided in 2018 regarding Native territories, calling it “unfortunately erroneous and incorrect”.

The company said it has remained true to its commitment made in December 2020 to increase the services offered to Native territories for home and auto insurance. The company said it has also been working closely with the human rights commission since the case began.

Fo Niemi, executive director of the race relations center, says the decision has an impact that goes beyond Wawanoloath. He noted that the commission’s decision mentions five other communities, unnamed, where there was at least a partial restriction in terms of insurance services.

“Thanks to his action, his speaking out, I hope this will encourage other Native people living in communities across Quebec to come forward,” said Niemi.

Niemi said they had hoped the commission would recognize the case as a case of redlining — a discriminatory practice in the United States where financial or other services are denied to minority populations in certain areas. Niemi said the issue could come up again should the matter go to court. Industrial Alliance has until November 11 to pay or take the case to the Quebec Human Rights Tribunal.

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The mayor of Gaspé hailed as a hero in France after rescuing an attacked train driver https://celenire.com/the-mayor-of-gaspe-hailed-as-a-hero-in-france-after-rescuing-an-attacked-train-driver/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 19:57:38 +0000 https://celenire.com/the-mayor-of-gaspe-hailed-as-a-hero-in-france-after-rescuing-an-attacked-train-driver/ Daniel Côté holds several titles: mayor of Gaspé, president of the Union of Quebec Municipalities (UMQ), prefect of the MRC Côte-de-Gaspé. Now add an international hero to the list. Côté is praised for intervening this week in a violent confrontation between a passenger and the driver of a high-speed train from Paris to Saint-Malo. In […]]]>

Daniel Côté holds several titles: mayor of Gaspé, president of the Union of Quebec Municipalities (UMQ), prefect of the MRC Côte-de-Gaspé. Now add an international hero to the list.

Côté is praised for intervening this week in a violent confrontation between a passenger and the driver of a high-speed train from Paris to Saint-Malo.

In a CBC interview Quebec AMCôté said he was quietly working on the train when he saw a passenger become aggressive and yell at the driver.

He said the man suddenly jumped on the driver and started hitting him. At one point, he said, the man put his hands around the driver’s neck and it looked like he was about to strangle him.

Côté said he couldn’t sit idly by.

“A lot of people saw the [altercation]no one came to help the train worker, so I did,” he said.

Driven by a rush of adrenaline, Côté said, he intervened and managed to subdue the man in seconds. French media picked up the story, saying the conductor thanked Côté and offered him a free drink during his trip.

A Renaissance man of sorts, Côté said he used some of the training he had as a volunteer firefighter who also practices judo in the spare time he has left to be a city ​​politician.

He said that eventually the perpetrator apologized and left the train.

Côté said he came out of the fight unscathed, but he couldn’t guarantee the same for the other guy.

“Maybe the passenger has a sore arm, but that’s his problem,” he said with a laugh.

Côté was reluctant to speak to reporters and have his story come out as he said he was simply doing his civic duty by intervening in the attack.

This did not prevent some local elected officials such as the mayor of Quebec, Bruno Marchand, from paying tribute to him for his courage.

“I would like to highlight the bravery of [Daniel Côté] for this heroic gesture!” he tweeted on Friday.

“Bravo Daniel, a necessary act that represents the courage of Quebecers, even in France.”

Premier François Legault also praised Côté for his bravery on Twitter.

Anyway, the mayor is not in France to exercise his talents as a judoka (practitioner of judo) but for official discussions on climate change for the UMQ.

He said he was happy the driver was safe and happy to resume his original mission.

“Helping people is intrinsic to me,” he said.

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Office vacancy rates rise downtown as employers vacate space https://celenire.com/office-vacancy-rates-rise-downtown-as-employers-vacate-space/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 01:30:31 +0000 https://celenire.com/office-vacancy-rates-rise-downtown-as-employers-vacate-space/ Breadcrumb Links Immovable Local company Company Industry consultant Altus Group says the office vacancy rate could reach 29% by 2027.]]>

Industry consultant Altus Group says the office vacancy rate could reach 29% by 2027.

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The office vacancy rate in downtown Montreal could climb to almost 30% over the next five years as more and more employers reduce their real estate footprint due to telework‘s growing popularity, according to a new forecast.

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Vacancy rates for class A and B buildings – the two most prestigious categories of office real estate – could climb to at least 21% and as high as 29% by 2027, city officials said on Tuesday. industrial consultant Altus Group. The upper forecast assumes that 40% of office space currently occupied by employers will not be retained when leases expire, Altus said. In this case, some 14.7 million square feet of space would be freed up, approximately nine times the office capacity of a landmark building like 1 Place Ville Marie.

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Like many other city centers, downtown Montreal has lost a large part of its worker base since March 2020 as telework – initially imposed by the Quebec government to reduce the risk of contagion – has been widely accepted by employees. Downtown vacancy rates have risen steadily since the start of the pandemic, reaching 17.6% in the third quarter for Class A and B buildings, according to data from Altus.

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“Telecommuting is here to stay,” said Sylvain Leclair, executive vice-president at Altus in Montreal, on Tuesday during a presentation organized by the Urban Development Institute. “We are seeing new leases being signed with floor area reductions of 20, 30 or 40%. We even saw a 50% reduction recently.

This drop in demand could eventually affect rents. For now at least, landlords are mostly obligated to offer additional features or services – at no additional cost – when renewing leases.

“It’s supply and demand,” Leclair said. “Building owners must increase rental packages. There will be pressure on rents over the next few years.

These conditions will inevitably lead to lower asset prices, according to Canderel chief executive Brett Miller, who says the property company recently sold three office properties. Only a year ago, Canderel, of Montreal, led a group of investors acquisition of Cominar Real Estate Investment Trust of Quebec in a multi-billion dollar deal.

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“I think there’s a correction coming,” Miller said. “The value of buildings will inevitably fall. When certain players have been too aggressive on financing or their investment assumptions, we will be there to react. But we are not there yet. »

Andrée Roy, vice-president of real estate financing at Montreal lender Otéra Capital, shares Miller’s concerns.

“The office remains a concern for us,” Roy said. “We are now mainly focusing on prestige buildings. It’s on a case-by-case basis. »

Compared to their counterparts in cities like Calgary, big employers in Montreal have been “excessively timid” when it comes to getting people back into the office, Miller said. And the intensification of renovation work in the Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine tunnel only risks making matters worse for the central business district.

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“When you have businesses bringing people back four days a month, that’s unacceptable to me,” he said. “And when we hear Prime Minister Legault say that teleworking is one of the solutions to (the half-closure) of the La Fontaine tunnel, it will kill the city center. We are doing everything we can to bring the city center back to life and encourage people to come back. »

For building owners, this means making the office more attractive by adding features such as employee lounges and bicycle parking, Miller said.

“You can no longer bet on the idea that you will have a big tenant who will pay rent for 10 or 20 years,” he said. “You have to sell a service, not just square meters. Landlords and managers need to think about how to revive the space, the building, and work hand-in-hand with the tenant to ensure we can bring employees back to the office.

ftomesco@postmedia.com

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Steven Dubois wins short track silver for Canada at World Cup opener in Montreal https://celenire.com/steven-dubois-wins-short-track-silver-for-canada-at-world-cup-opener-in-montreal/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 23:43:44 +0000 https://celenire.com/steven-dubois-wins-short-track-silver-for-canada-at-world-cup-opener-in-montreal/ Steven Dubois, who won a silver medal in speed skating for Canada in the 1,500 meters at the Beijing Olympics in February, achieved the same result at the season-opening World Cup in short track on Saturday to Montreal. Dubois, who was leading halfway through the A final, reached the finish line at the Maurice Richard […]]]>

Steven Dubois, who won a silver medal in speed skating for Canada in the 1,500 meters at the Beijing Olympics in February, achieved the same result at the season-opening World Cup in short track on Saturday to Montreal.

Dubois, who was leading halfway through the A final, reached the finish line at the Maurice Richard Arena in two minutes 14.312 seconds behind South Korean Park Ji Won and 1-1000ths ahead of his teammate, Hong Kyung Hwan, in a photo-finish.

Montreal’s Pascal Dion fell and finished last among the six finishers in 2:54.242.

Two weeks ago, Dubois, of Terrebonne, Que., won the men’s national title for a third straight year at the Canadian championships in Quebec.

“He has great potential,” Dubois’ former relay teammate, retired Charles Hamelin, told Montreal newspaper La Presse. “He has exceptional athletic and skating qualities that I myself have never had in my life. If you combine these qualities with a certain confidence, forget it, the rest of the world will not find it funny!”

“When confidence kicks in and he goes in without fear, he’s going to be tough to beat.”

WATCH | Dubois wins the silver medal in the 1500 meters in photo-finish:

Steven Dubois wins silver at the 1500m Short Track World Cup

Terrebonne, Que. Native Steven Dubois finished with a time of 2:14.312 to narrowly claim silver in the men’s 1500 meters final at the ISU Short Track World Cup in Montreal.

Dubois, a triple medalist at the Beijing Winter Games, won silver in a penalty event in China as well as gold in the 5,000m relay and bronze in the 500m.

Dubois, 28, started skating at age 11 or 12, preferring speed skating to hockey because his parents didn’t like the atmosphere of hockey rinks.

A substitute with the 2018 Olympic team in Pyeongchang, South Korea, he finished fourth in the 1,500m at the 2019 world championships and the following year he took silver in a triple medal at the Four Continents Championships. to Montreal.

Canada wins bronze medal in mixed relay

Elsewhere on Saturday, Canada won bronze in the 2,000-metre mixed relay, finishing just behind the Belgian team with a time of 2:41:066. South Korea won gold.

Canada was represented by Rikki Doak of Fredericton, Courtney Sarault of Moncton, NB, Mathieu Pelletier of Laval, Que., and Félix Roussel of Sherbrooke, Que.

WATCH | Canada skates to bronze in mixed relay:

Canada narrowly wins bronze at short track World Cup 2000m relay

Despite a crash at the finish line, the Canadians clocked 2:41.066 to claim the bronze medal in the 2000-metre mixed relay final at the ISU Short Track World Cup in Montreal.

Jordan Pierre-Gilles of Sherbrooke was fourth in the men’s 1,000 (1:24.532). Roberts Kruzbergs of Latvia won in 1:23.959.

Claudia Gagnon placed seventh (2:32.519) out of seven finishers in the women’s 1,500m, won by Suzanne Schulting (2:31.052) of the Netherlands.

In the women’s 1,000, reigning three-time Canadian champion Kim Boutin finished fourth in her heat and qualified for the B final. The A final featured Doak, who fell and did not record a time.

Live streaming of the event on CBCSports.ca will continue Sunday at 1:30 p.m. ET.

The next stop on the short track World Cup circuit is Salt Lake City on Nov. 4, followed by Almaty, Kazakhstan (Dec. 9-11, Dec. 16-18).

For shorter coverage, see CBC Sports presents, our weekly program featuring the best high performance athletes from across Canada and around the world. Air the show Sunday at 4 p.m. ET

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Death of a Quebec biker after a police chase: a watchdog is investigating https://celenire.com/death-of-a-quebec-biker-after-a-police-chase-a-watchdog-is-investigating/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 14:27:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/death-of-a-quebec-biker-after-a-police-chase-a-watchdog-is-investigating/ Quebec police watchdog launches independent investigation after a man on a motorcycle died shortly after a police chase. The intervention involving the Sûreté du Québec (SQ) took place in Estrie early Wednesday morning, according to a press release from the Bureau of Independent Investigators (BEI). SQ claims officers spotted the driver of a motorcycle on […]]]>

Quebec police watchdog launches independent investigation after a man on a motorcycle died shortly after a police chase.

The intervention involving the Sûreté du Québec (SQ) took place in Estrie early Wednesday morning, according to a press release from the Bureau of Independent Investigators (BEI).

SQ claims officers spotted the driver of a motorcycle on Highway 108 in Bury around 1:30 a.m. with a taillight off.

According to the officers’ version of events, they followed the motorcycle for several minutes before attempting to intercept it. When officers put on their turn signals, the motorcycle suddenly accelerated, they claim. There was a brief chase, but police say they lost sight of the motorcycle on Route 257.

At 5:39 a.m., BEI said a resident called 911 to report an unresponsive man on the ground near a motorcycle on Route 257 in Lingwick.

This motorcycle would be the one involved in the chase with the police, the BEI said.

The 32-year-old was later pronounced dead.

Five BEI investigators have been assigned to investigate the incident, and police officers from the Sûreté de Québec will participate in the investigation.


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Montreal doctor’s license revoked for lies on resume, ruling says https://celenire.com/montreal-doctors-license-revoked-for-lies-on-resume-ruling-says/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 17:17:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/montreal-doctors-license-revoked-for-lies-on-resume-ruling-says/ An emergency doctor at Montreal’s Fleury Hospital has had his license withdrawn after the College of Physicians found he had not told the truth about his past studies in the United States. Sanjeev Sirpal was admitted to the College of Physicians in April 2019 and started working for the Center de santé et de services […]]]>

An emergency doctor at Montreal’s Fleury Hospital has had his license withdrawn after the College of Physicians found he had not told the truth about his past studies in the United States.

Sanjeev Sirpal was admitted to the College of Physicians in April 2019 and started working for the Center de santé et de services sociaux de Montréal-Nord (CIUSSS du Nord de l’Ile de Montréal).

The judgment of October 11 says that Sirpal did not tell the truth related to his misconduct, background and references in his previous career when obtaining his license to practice as a family medicine specialist in the province.

The judgment written by college president Daniel Y. Lord and doctors Lise Cusson and Raja Tamaz states that Sirpal falsely answered a series of questions about his past academic misconduct and that he “hid problematic aspects of his time in various American universities”.

“These answers, compared to those he would later include on his college registration form, demonstrate that the respondent has a long history of lack of transparency with authorities governing the medical profession,” the document states.

Sirpal Sanjeev had his medical license revoked after it was discovered he had falsified information about his education. SOURCE: College of Physicians

The ruling says Sirpal was fired from the University of Miami after allegations of misconduct and an ethical issue.

Sirpal, the document reads, “sees this as a problem of ethnic discrimination”.

The documents show that he did not disclose this information when he was admitted to a doctoral program in biochemistry and molecular biology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

He was kicked out of Johns Hopkins.

“Although he acknowledges the existence of interprofessional friction, the respondent explains that he did not complete his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University, because he had made the decision to leave the program to concentrate on his training. medicine, which better satisfied his interest in scientific matters,” the document reads.

On a form from the College of Physicians asking if he had been found guilty of misconduct by a post-secondary institution, Sirpal answered “no”.

After Johns Hopkins, Sirpal went to Saint Lucia, received his MD in 2013 from Spartan Health School of Medicine and moved to Ontario after his father passed away and worked as a researcher at Brampton City Hospital in Ontario. He then studied at the University of Toronto in 2016.

Sirpal argued that “the limitation imposed by the form led him to conclude that he did not have to provide information about his academic background before graduating from Spartan University of Health Sciences. “.

The college concluded that “the respondent’s deceptions and half-truths ‘corrupted’ the process of his admission to practice.”

Sirpal’s attorney argues in the document that he answered questions about college enrollment “to the best of his knowledge” and that “he cannot be faulted for having misanalyzed the form.”

The Complainant, however, argues that “he systematically concealed potentially prejudicial facts from his admission upon admission to the Order, and by his responses he exhibited mental restraint”.

The judgment indicates that he “knowingly” provided the College of Physicians of Quebec “inaccurate information about his antics on various American university campuses”.

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