Quebec Canada – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:03:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec Canada – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 Trudeau defends military spending ahead of NATO summit https://celenire.com/trudeau-defends-military-spending-ahead-of-nato-summit/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:03:20 +0000 https://celenire.com/trudeau-defends-military-spending-ahead-of-nato-summit/ Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to face tough questions at a major NATO summit this week, as a new report released by the alliance ahead of the meeting shows Canada is heading in the wrong direction by in terms of military spending. Members of the 30-member military alliance agreed in 2014 to increase defense […]]]>

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to face tough questions at a major NATO summit this week, as a new report released by the alliance ahead of the meeting shows Canada is heading in the wrong direction by in terms of military spending.

Members of the 30-member military alliance agreed in 2014 to increase defense spending to 2% of their national gross domestic product, and the goal is expected to be front and center when leaders meet in Spain from Wednesday.

But the new report released by NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg estimates that Canada’s defense spending will instead decline as a percentage of GDP to 1.27% this year, down from 1.32% last year and 1 .42% in 2020.

The report did not specify the reason for the expected decline, or whether it includes $8 billion in new military spending promised in the April federal budget, the target of which was not clearly defined.

Asked about the report at a press conference at the end of this year’s G7 meeting in Germany, as he prepared to travel to Madrid for the NATO leaders’ summit, Trudeau said that the government had announced several “significant” new investments.

These include $4.9 billion to upgrade Norad, the shared US-Canadian system used to detect incoming air and sea threats in North America, as well as plans to buy new fighter jets to replace the Canada‘s aging CF-18s.

The prime minister also said that Canada has repeatedly demonstrated its commitment to the NATO alliance by deploying troops and equipment in various missions, including leading a multinational NATO force in Latvia.

“Canada is still part of NATO missions and continues to step up significantly,” Trudeau said.

“We know how important it is to take action and we will continue to do so so the world knows it can count on Canada to advance the cause of democracy, the rule of law and opportunity for all. “, he added.

Successive Canadian governments have been reluctant to meet the 2% spending target, which the Parliamentary Budget Officer said would require an additional $75 billion over the next five years.

Instead, they highlighted Canada’s many other commitments to the alliance, including providing 700 Canadian troops to Latvia as well as several naval warships to assist NATO patrols in the North Atlantic and Mediterranean.

This is despite Canada accepting the goal, as well as Stoltenberg’s repeated urgings and criticism from US officials in Washington calling on Ottawa to invest more in its military and collective defence.

The continued decline in Canada’s defense spending as a percentage of GDP will almost certainly lead to even sharper questions for Trudeau in Madrid than previously anticipated, said defense analyst David Perry of the Canadian Institute of Business. world.

This is especially true given the confusion surrounding the government’s announcement last week of its intention to invest in upgrading Norad, with uncertainty about where the money will actually come from, when it will be spent and what.

“I guess they were hoping to send a message with the continental defense piece that regardless of what is happening in Europe, Canada has other defense commitments and that contributes to the overall security of the alliance” , Perry said.

“But the continental defense piece deployment mechanic would take away some of that.”

The fact that defense spending is on a downward trajectory as Canada faces pressure to contribute more overseas and grapples with major shortages of military personnel and equipment is also a concern, said Robert Baines of the Canadian NATO Association.

“I’ve always been amazed that Prime Minister Trudeau has the ease to dance to the very serious defense situation Canada faces,” Baines said. “Trying to do so many things and then having so many problems and resource challenges.”

To that end, Trudeau dodged the question of whether Canada is prepared to send more troops to Latvia, as NATO seeks to double the size of its forces across Eastern Europe in response to the invasion of Ukraine by Russia.

Latvia’s ambassador to Canada told The Canadian Press earlier this week that Canada was talking with allies about bolstering the Canadian-led battlegroup in his country.

The battlegroup in Latvia is one of four established by NATO in 2017, with Germany leading another such unit in Lithuania and Britain and the United States responsible for forces in Estonia and Poland. respectively.

Germany and Britain have both said in recent weeks that they are ready to lead larger combat units in Lithuania and Estonia, but Canada has so far remained silent on its plans in Latvia.

Trudeau also did not say whether Canada is ready to put more military personnel on high readiness, as Stoltenberg announced on Monday that the alliance plans to increase the number of troops on standby from 40,000 to 300,000.

“We have worked very closely with NATO partners, with the NATO Secretary General, and especially with the Latvians, where Canada leads the (battle group) and is committed to ensuring that we continue to stand up against Russia,” Trudeau said.

“We, like others, are making plans to be able to expand quickly,” he added. “And these are conversations that I look forward to having over the next two days at NATO.”

Baines predicted that additional troops and equipment to be added to the Canadian-led battlegroup in Latvia will come primarily from other NATO members, as Canada has only recently deployed more troops to the region.

The government announced in February that it was sending an artillery unit and 100 additional soldiers to reinforce the 600 Canadian soldiers already present in the Baltic state. It also recently deployed two additional warships to the area.

Perry said it’s still unclear how much more the Canadian military, which is about 10,000 short, has to spare.

“Maybe it’s possible to find some more in the back of the closet,” he said.

“But if the alliance is going to collectively step up with additional troop and equipment commitments, then I’m sure there will be a lot of pressure on us to be part of it as well.”


This report from The Canadian Press was first published on June 28, 2022.


— With files from Lee Berthiaume in Ottawa

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Canada’s response to Covid in the first 2 years of the pandemic compares well to measures in other countries https://celenire.com/canadas-response-to-covid-in-the-first-2-years-of-the-pandemic-compares-well-to-measures-in-other-countries/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 04:06:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/canadas-response-to-covid-in-the-first-2-years-of-the-pandemic-compares-well-to-measures-in-other-countries/ Compared to other G10 countries, Canada handled the first 2 years of the COVID-19 pandemic well by most measures, according to analysis by CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj .ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.220316. Canada had some of the strictest policies to help contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2, such as movement restrictions and public gatherings, workplace closures, event cancellations […]]]>

Compared to other G10 countries, Canada handled the first 2 years of the COVID-19 pandemic well by most measures, according to analysis by CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj .ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.220316.

Canada had some of the strictest policies to help contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2, such as movement restrictions and public gatherings, workplace closures, event cancellations and travel controls international.

“Keeping in mind the uncertainties about causation, we can hypothesize that high vaccination percentages and good compliance with sustained public health restrictions explain at least part of Canada’s strong performance in limiting vaccinations. health burdens related to SARS-CoV-2,” writes Dr. Fahad Razak, Unity Health Toronto and University of Toronto, with co-authors.

The analysis focused on the response of 11 countries to the pandemic from February 2020 to February 2022: Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States. The authors chose other G10 countries as a comparison group because of similarities in economic and political models, per capita income and population size.

Some highlights:

  • Japan was an outlier, with very low rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 deaths, despite relatively low vaccination rates during the first half of the pandemic, measures less stringent public health policies and an older population compared to peer countries.
  • Of the remaining countries, Canada’s COVID-19 death rate was the lowest (919/million), with all other countries at over 1,000/million. Canada also had the lowest excess mortality, a measure that includes all COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 related deaths.
  • Italy had the strictest austerity measures in place, followed by Canada.
  • The United States recorded the most weeks of school closures, followed by Canada.
  • Canada was one of the slowest countries to introduce SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, but as of February 2022 had the highest proportion of people fully vaccinated (using the original 2-dose protocol).
  • The Canadian economy has shown similar inflation and public debt growth, but weaker gross domestic product growth than other countries.

Comparing Canada with the countries most affected by COVID-19 shows how different the experience of the pandemic could have been for Canadians in the first 2 years:

“If the U.S. vaccination rate and COVID-19 death rate had occurred in Canada, approximately 5.9 million fewer Canadians would have been vaccinated and approximately 68,800 more Canadians would have died from of COVID-19,” the authors write.

Governments and the public may find lessons from the analysis useful as the pandemic continues to spread.

“As the country goes through the next phases of the pandemic, careful data collection and analysis is needed, while recognizing the limitations of available indicators and comparisons. Leaders should share new findings with the public in a transparent and timely manner, and make strategic adjustments to strengthen measures that appear to be successful and modify others as needed.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors. See in full here.

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Memphis HC likes Calvin Austin’s fit in Canada attack: ‘I don’t think you need to be worried’ about his size https://celenire.com/memphis-hc-likes-calvin-austins-fit-in-canada-attack-i-dont-think-you-need-to-be-worried-about-his-size/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 13:17:06 +0000 https://celenire.com/memphis-hc-likes-calvin-austins-fit-in-canada-attack-i-dont-think-you-need-to-be-worried-about-his-size/ Ryan Silverfield was the offensive line coach and running play coordinator for the Memphis Tigers in 2018 when the small wide receiver by the name of Calvin Austin III first walked into the building. Not just short, but short, he was a real freshman who walked in 2017, even though he would be redshirted that […]]]>

Ryan Silverfield was the offensive line coach and running play coordinator for the Memphis Tigers in 2018 when the small wide receiver by the name of Calvin Austin III first walked into the building. Not just short, but short, he was a real freshman who walked in 2017, even though he would be redshirted that year. it wasn’t the most memorable first impression.

“I just remember this skinny guy – probably 149 pounds at the time – just this little guy who looked like a little kid,” Silverfield, now the head coach, told Brian Batko for the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. “He sat in the back of the team room and I was like, ‘What is this? This is not a good choice here’”.

Of course, things have a way of working out, and Austin put his skills on tape and in the field. Although he hasn’t played much of an attacking role until 2020, his last two seasons have shown what he can do. He caught 63 passes for 1,053 yards and 11 touchdowns that year, and followed in 2021 with 74 catches for 1,149 yards and eight touchdowns. He also had three combined rushing and returning touchdowns during that span.

Despite standing just under 5’8” and weighing 170 pounds at the 2022 NFL Scouting Combine, Austin’s defining trait is what stood out the most. That would be his sheer speed, exemplified by his sprint time of 4.32 seconds for 40 yards. Despite his small size, it was enough to have him drafted in the fourth round by the Pittsburgh Steelers to plug into an offense led by Matt Canada who should have a plan for how to use him.

“He can benefit from doing that kind of stuff, so I think it’s a unique fit, system-wise, because Matt does flying sweeps, does movement,” Silverfield told Batko at about the opportunity of his former catcher in Pittsburgh. “So if you’re still worried about Calvin’s size, I don’t think you need to be because they’ll be able to move him around so much.”

Silverfield probably knows a thing or two about the Steelers’ intentions for Austin that we don’t, given that they would naturally have spoken to him several times during the pre-draft process in order to get a feel for the player.

Pittsburgh has natural ties to Memphis (head coach Mike Tomlin was even a graduate assistant there in 1996), but nonetheless, by the very nature of his skills, one would imagine that any team willing to invest in a player like Austin will have ideas. in mind on how to maximize what he can offer, and that includes finding ways to get the ball to him through space.

Going into the 2022 season, Austin will have to fight for playing time behind Chase Claypool and Diontae Johnson, as well as fellow rookie George Pickens, who was drafted two rounds earlier. This is truly the first year with Canada as offensive coordinator in which he is expected to lead an offense that truly reflects his intentions, so it will be interesting to see how the Memphis product stacks up. integrate in there.

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National Geographic Pristine Seas Launches Summer Expedition in Canada to Support Indigenous-Led Protected Areas – National Geographic Society Newsroom https://celenire.com/national-geographic-pristine-seas-launches-summer-expedition-in-canada-to-support-indigenous-led-protected-areas-national-geographic-society-newsroom/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:00:09 +0000 https://celenire.com/national-geographic-pristine-seas-launches-summer-expedition-in-canada-to-support-indigenous-led-protected-areas-national-geographic-society-newsroom/ Pristine Seas will work with Indigenous and regional partners, the Government of Canada and Oceans North Washington, DC (June 23, 2022)—National Geographic Pristine Seas, a global marine conservation initiative, will launch an expedition to priority marine conservation sites in the Arctic and Subarctic that have been identified by Indigenous leaders and the Canadian government . […]]]>

Pristine Seas will work with Indigenous and regional partners, the Government of Canada and Oceans North

Washington, DC (June 23, 2022)—National Geographic Pristine Seas, a global marine conservation initiative, will launch an expedition to priority marine conservation sites in the Arctic and Subarctic that have been identified by Indigenous leaders and the Canadian government . The expedition is in partnership with Oceans North, an organization dedicated to supporting marine conservation in partnership with indigenous and coastal communities. Oceans North is helping facilitate the expedition in conjunction with Indigenous and regional partners and will have staff on board the vessel.

The expedition includes a multidisciplinary team that will explore and document the unique and largely understudied underwater ecosystems and a media team that will capture footage to produce two documentary films. Scientific research and documentary films are intended to support marine conservation in the regions.

Scientists on board will use a variety of research methods, including underwater visual census, seafloor sampling, remote cameras, and environmental DNA analysis (eDNA), a method of collecting traces of material biology to identify species. The data collected will be used to develop a scientific article with the results of the expedition that will contribute to a better understanding of the biodiversity and ecosystems of James Bay, Hudson Bay and Nunatsiavut waters. Scientific discoveries will support Indigenous-led conservation.

The Pristine Seas media team has joined over thirty expeditions and produced dozens of films supporting the creation of new marine protected areas around the world by showcasing critical underwater ecosystems and the communities that depend on them. Recently, the team produced the Emmy Award-winning documentary “The last ice cream,” Pristine Seas’ feature debut that tells the story of Inuit communities struggling to protect the rapidly changing Arctic that has been their home for centuries. The two expedition documentaries will amplify the voices of Indigenous and regional leaders and support their efforts in marine protection and stewardship.

During the months of July and August, the expedition will survey five priority areas and will take place aboard the MV Polar Prince, a 220-foot (67-meter) Indigenous-owned, Canadian-flagged research icebreaker. To follow along throughout the expedition, Pristine Seas will share regular updates from the field at instagram and Twitter.

“Pristine Seas will survey and document Canada’s Arctic and Subarctic regions to support our Indigenous and regional partners and the Government of Canada‘s shared goal of creating new marine protected areas,” said Enric Sala, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and executive director of National Geographic. Geographic Virgin Seas.

Representatives from Indigenous and regional partners, the Government of Canada and Oceans North, will join Pristine Seas as partners aboard the Polar Prince during the expedition. Additionally, the Students on Ice (SOI) Foundation, an educational organization that encourages on the spot Youth Experiences in the Polar Regions and Beyond, will be on board with indigenous young adults who will gain hands-on experience in expedition, conservation and scientific research.

“We have worked with National Geographic Pristine Seas and Oceans North to ensure the region’s significance to the Inuit, and to ensure that our historic use and knowledge of the land, sea and ice is told through our voices. . It is essential to have traditional Inuit knowledge, combined with science, to ensure that our understanding of the region is complete,” said Johannes Lampe, President of the Nunatsiavut Government.

“We are delighted to partner with National Geographic Pristine Seas on this expedition, which will help support marine conservation and shine a light on the successes of governments and local communities,” said Louie Porta, Executive Director of Oceans North.

“The SOI Foundation is very pleased to be collaborating on this important journey to Canada’s North and to help engage and inspire young leaders in communities across the region,” said Geoff Green, Founder of the SOI Foundation.

“The Eeyou Marine Region Wildlife Council is thrilled and honored to have the opportunity to support this global marine initiative, led by the world renowned National Geographic Pristine Seas. This expedition will not only serve to expand our local knowledge of the wildlife and natural components that form our current seascape climate for the James Bay Cree coastal communities of Eeyou Istchee, but will also connect our region in a global effort to protect and conserve the marine areas of our Earth for future generations,” said Angela Coxon, Director of the Eeyou Marine Region Wildlife Council.

This Pristine Seas campaign will support Indigenous-led conservation and the Canadian government’s commitment to protect 25% of its oceans by 2025 and 30% by 2030. Currently, Canada has protected 13% of its oceans.

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About National Geographic Pristine Seas

National Geographic Pristine Seas is an exploration, research and media project founded and led by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala. The Pristine Seas team is made up of determined scientists, policy experts and filmmakers who work to inspire the creation of protected areas where marine life can thrive, while ensuring effective management for years to come. Pristine Seas has helped inspire the creation of 26 marine reserves, an area totaling over 6.5 million square kilometers. Learn more at nationalgeographic.org/pristineseas.

About Oceans North

Oceans North is a charitable organization that promotes science and community conservation in the Arctic and Atlantic regions of Canada, as well as West Greenland. The organization’s goal is to promote policies and programs that address the unprecedented environmental changes occurring in northern marine ecosystems and to ensure that they are protected within the framework of knowledge, rights and aboriginal consultation.

About the Students on Ice (SOI) Foundation

SOI’s mission is to foster globally minded youth by immersing them in nature, transformative learning environments and collaborative cross-cultural travel. Since 1999, thousands of young people from more than 55 countries have participated in SOI expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic. SOI is also active in supporting initiatives and partnerships focused on ocean literacy, Arctic policy, climate change and a sustainable blue economy.

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‘Day zero’: Gqeberha in South Africa is counting the days until its water taps dry up https://celenire.com/day-zero-gqeberha-in-south-africa-is-counting-the-days-until-its-water-taps-dry-up/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 08:45:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/day-zero-gqeberha-in-south-africa-is-counting-the-days-until-its-water-taps-dry-up/ It’s the bumpy road – which winds between tight slums and state-funded beige houses – that makes it difficult to balance containers filled with 70 liters of water on its way back. “At home, you feel far away when you push 70 kilograms of water in a wheelbarrow,” said the 49-year-old resident of the impoverished […]]]>

It’s the bumpy road – which winds between tight slums and state-funded beige houses – that makes it difficult to balance containers filled with 70 liters of water on its way back.

“At home, you feel far away when you push 70 kilograms of water in a wheelbarrow,” said the 49-year-old resident of the impoverished South African township of Kwanobuhle.

Now much of the city is counting down to “day zero”, the day when all the taps run dry, when no significant amount of water can be extracted. That’s in about two weeks, unless authorities seriously ramp up their response.

The wider Eastern Cape region of South Africa suffered a severe multi-year drought between 2015 and 2020, which devastated the local economy, especially its agricultural sector. It had only a brief respite before falling back into drought at the end of 2021.

Like so many of the world’s worst natural resource crises, the severe water shortage here is a combination of mismanagement and distorted weather conditions caused by human-induced climate change.

On top of that, thousands of leaks throughout the water supply system mean that much of the water that comes out of dams may never reach homes. Poor maintenance, such as a faulty pump on a main water supply, only made the situation worse.

This has left Malambile – who lives with her sister and four children – no choice but to drive around the township with her wheelbarrow every day for the past three months. Without this daily ritual, he and his family would have no drinking water at all.

“People who don’t live here have no idea what it’s like to wake up in the morning, and the first thing that comes to mind is water,” Malambile said. His family has enough containers to hold 150 liters of water, but every day he fills about half of them while the rest is still used at home.

“Tomorrow those are empty, and I have to bring them back,” he said. “It’s my routine, every day, and it’s tiring.”

Countdown to day zero

The outlook for significant rains to help replenish reservoirs here looks bleak, and if things continue as they are, around 40% of Gqeberha town will be left without running water at all.

The Eastern Cape relies on weather systems known as “minimal lows”. Slow-moving weather systems can produce rains of more than 50 millimeters (about 2 inches) in 24 hours, followed by days of persistent wet weather. The problem is, that kind of rain just doesn’t come.

The next few months do not paint a promising picture either. In its seasonal climate forecast, the South African Meteorological Service predicts below normal rainfall.

This is not a recent trend. For nearly a decade, the catchments of Nelson Mandela Bay’s main supply dams have received below average rainfall. Water levels have slowly declined to the point where all four dams sit at a combined level of less than 12% of their normal capacity. According to city officials, less than 2% of the remaining water supply is actually usable.

Cape Town’s 2018 water crisis, which was also triggered by the previous severe drought as well as management issues, is fresh on people’s minds here. City residents would line up for their individually rationed 50 liters of water each day, for fear of reaching day zero. He never reached that point, but he got dangerously close. Strict rationing allowed the city to halve its water consumption and avoid the worst.

And with no heavy rain expected, Nelson Mandela Bay officials are so worried about their own zero day that they are asking residents to drastically reduce their water usage. They simply have no choice, said the municipality’s water supply manager, Joseph Tsatsire.

“While it is difficult to control each person’s consumption, we hope to get the message across that it is crucial that everyone reduces their consumption to 50 liters per person per day,” he said.

A sign urging residents to limit their water consumption in the suburb of Gqeberha.
To put that into perspective, the average American uses more than seven times that amount, at 82 gallons (372 liters) per day.

While some parts of the city will likely never feel the full impact of a possible zero day, various interventions are underway to help residents of so-called “red” areas where their taps inevitably dry up.

Earlier this month, the South African national government sent a high-ranking delegation to Nelson Mandela Bay to take charge of the crisis and implement contingency strategies to stretch the town’s latest dwindling supply.

Finding and repairing leaks was a focus, while plans are underway to extract “dead storage water” below current levels from supply dams. Boreholes have been drilled in some places to extract groundwater.

Some of the interventions – including repairing leaks and trucking in water – mean some people who had lost their water supply at home are starting to have a trickle from their taps at night. But that’s not enough, and authorities are looking for bigger, longer-term solutions to a problem that will only get worse as the Earth warms.
Workers constructing a water collection point in the Walmer suburb of Gqeberha.
South Africa is naturally drought-prone, but the kind of multi-year droughts that cause so much misery and disruption are becoming more common.

A desalination plant – to purify water from the oceans for public consumption – is under consideration, although such projects take months of planning, are expensive and often contribute more to the climate crisis, when fueled by fossil fuels.

Residents of Kwanobuhle are worried about the future, wondering when the crisis will end.

At the communal tap, Babalwa Manyube, 25, fills her own water canisters while her one-year-old daughter waits in her car.

“Flushing the toilet, cooking, cleaning – these are problems we all face when there is no water in the taps,” she said. “But raising a baby and having to worry about water is a whole different story. And when will that end? No one can tell us.”

Adapt at home

In Kwanobuhle, public housing is for people with little or no income. Unemployment is rampant and crime is on the rise. The streets are crowded with people looking for money. Former shipping containers operate as makeshift hair salons.

Just across the metro is Kamma Heights, a new leafy suburb located on a hill with a beautiful, sweeping view of the city. It is punctuated by several newly built luxury homes, and residents can often be seen sitting on their balconies, enjoying the last rays of sunshine before the sun sets behind the horizon.

Some residents of Kamma Heights are wealthy enough to secure an emergency water supply. Rhett Saayman, 46, breathes a sigh of relief every time it rains and he hears the water flowing in the reservoirs he has erected around his house over the past two years.

Her plan to save money on water in the long term has proven to be an invaluable investment in securing her household water supply.

Saayman has a storage capacity of 18,500 liters. Water for general household use, such as bathrooms, passes through a 5 micron particulate filter and carbon block filter, while drinking and cooking water passes through a reverse osmosis filter.

Rhett Saayman standing next to one of his many water tanks at his home in Kamma Heights.

“We still depend on municipal water from time to time when we haven’t had enough rain, but it can happen two or three times a year, and normally only for a few days at a time,” he said. declared. “The last time we used municipal water was in February, and since then we have had enough rain to feed ourselves.”

He added: “Looking at the way things are going in the city, it’s really a relief to know that we have clean water and enough to flush the toilet and take a shower. Our investment is paying off. its fruit.”

Residents in many parts of the Bay Area are being urged to reduce their usage so that water can be routed through standpipes – temporary pipes placed in strategic locations so that water can be diverted to areas who need it most.

This means that some of the city’s wealthier neighborhoods, such as Kama Heights, could see a huge drop in their water supply, and they too will have to queue at communal taps, just like those in Kwanobuhle do.

Looking ahead, local weather authorities have painted a worrying picture for months to come, with some warnings that the problem has been left to rot for so long it may be impossible to reverse.

“We’ve been warning city officials about this for years,” said Garth Sampson, spokesman for the South African Meteorological Service at Nelson Mandela Bay. “Whether you want to blame politicians and civil servants for their mismanagement, or the public for not conserving water, it doesn’t matter anymore. more.”

Water flows from a tap at a water collection point in the suburb of Walmer in Gqeberha, South Africa.  This is one of many collection areas set up in the city.

According to Sampson, the watersheds feeding Nelson Mandela Bay need about 50 millimeters of rain in a 24-hour period for there to be a significant impact on dam levels.

“Looking at the stats from the last few years, our best chance of seeing 50 millimeter events will probably be in August. If we don’t see significant rainfall by September, then our next best chance is not until around March of the year. next year, which is concerning,” he said.

“The only way to end this water crisis is with a flood. But fortunately or unfortunately – depending on who you ask – there are no forecasts suggesting rain of this magnitude anytime soon.”

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‘Starting to Tell Our Truth’: Sixties Scoop Exhibit Comes to Vancouver from Alberta https://celenire.com/starting-to-tell-our-truth-sixties-scoop-exhibit-comes-to-vancouver-from-alberta/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 00:13:14 +0000 https://celenire.com/starting-to-tell-our-truth-sixties-scoop-exhibit-comes-to-vancouver-from-alberta/ Disclaimer: This story deals with a disturbing topic that may upset and trigger some readers. Discretion is advised. A traveling exhibit focusing on truth and reconciliation has made its way from Alberta to the Vancouver Public Library. The exhibit, titled “Bi-Giwen: Coming Home — Truth Telling from the Sixties Scoop,” is an initiative of the […]]]>

Disclaimer: This story deals with a disturbing topic that may upset and trigger some readers. Discretion is advised.

A traveling exhibit focusing on truth and reconciliation has made its way from Alberta to the Vancouver Public Library. The exhibit, titled “Bi-Giwen: Coming Home — Truth Telling from the Sixties Scoop,” is an initiative of the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta.

It opened in Vancouver on Saturday and will remain until Tuesday, before being wrapped up for display elsewhere.

“The stories, memories and impacts of the Sixties Scoop are complex,” Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta president and survivor Sandra Relling said at the launch.

“What is clear though is the pain, grief and loss that survivors have and continue to experience. This illustrates a strong need for healing for survivors. We begin to speak our truth.

The story continues under the ad

Read more:

‘We are invisible’: Amid residential school reckoning, BC Sixties Scoop survivors want action

The Sixties Scoop refers to a period between the 1950s and 1980s, after changes to the Indian Act allowed provincial governments to take over Indigenous child welfare. Thousands of First Nations, Inuit and Métis have been removed from their biological families, usually without consent, and placed in non-Indigenous homes.

They were stripped of their language and culture and left with complex questions about their identity, “feeling that they didn’t belong in either the Indigenous world or the non-Indigenous world,” Relling said. Many have faced extreme forms of physical, sexual, mental and spiritual abuse.

Bi-Giwen is the first exhibit of its kind in Canada, Relling added, featuring the oral testimonies of 12 roundup survivors. It also includes replica canvases from engagement sessions with survivors in Alberta leading up to the provincial government’s formal apology in 2018.

The originals are housed at the Royal Alberta Museum, where discussions about creating a permanent Sixties Scoop exhibit are currently underway.


Click to play video: ''60s scoop lawyer Katherine Legrange on the need for a national inquiry''







Sixties Scoop lawyer Katherine Legrange on the need for a national inquiry


Sixties Scoop lawyer Katherine Legrange on the need for a national inquiry

The launch in Vancouver brought together local survivors, elders, volunteers and politicians, as well as members of the Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta. Staff were on hand to help visitors cope with the pain and re-emerging trauma.

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Relling urged other guests who might feel “guilt and shame” browsing the exhibit to “channel” their emotions into action.

“Speak even if your voice is shaking. It is essential to our healing and our reconciliation,” she said.

“The most important thing you can do is acknowledge what happened, honor the survivor and make sure we all take action today to eliminate racist views by educating people about this story and its ongoing impacts.”

Read more:

Indigenous organizations call for national Sixties Scoop inquiry

The Manitoba government apologized for its role in the Sixties Scoop in 2015. The Alberta government followed suit in 2018, and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe did the same in 2019 .

On Saturday, Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta board member Adam North Peigan called on BC Premier John Horgan to do the same in the BC Legislative Assembly.

“That didn’t happen in British Columbia,” he lamented, pointing to politicians and reporters in the crowd.

“Everyone of you with influence…you need to encourage the BC government to apologize to make this a western Canadian movement.”


Click to play video: ''60s scoop survivor Marylou Fonda tries to find her birth mother''







Sixties Scoop Survivor Marylou Fonda Tries To Find Her Birth Mother


Sixties Scoop Survivor Marylou Fonda Tries To Find Her Birth Mother

The Vancouver Public Library said Saturday it was pleased to host the exhibit as part of its commitment to decolonize public institutions in Canada.

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The library regularly features Indigenous collections, authors, speakers, film screenings and workshops, and has an Indigenous storyteller in residence.

Speaking from his own personal experience studying for the Canadian citizenship test, Vancouver Public Library board member Abeer Yusuf said the Sixties Scoop is nowhere to be found in the guidebook.

“It’s pretty heartbreaking to me that it’s not acknowledged or mentioned anywhere, but it’s obviously a core part of our history and how we’ve become,” she said.

The Hope for Wellness Helpline offers culturally appropriate counseling and crisis intervention to all Indigenous people who are experiencing trauma, distress, strong emotions and painful memories. The line can be reached anytime toll-free at 1-855-242-3310.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Kickboxing champ faces uncertain future as he fights to stay in Canada https://celenire.com/kickboxing-champ-faces-uncertain-future-as-he-fights-to-stay-in-canada/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/kickboxing-champ-faces-uncertain-future-as-he-fights-to-stay-in-canada/ It’s an unlikely couple, the two of them. One a 26-year-old Egyptian fighter, the other a little boy. They practice, practice with a balance ball and practice, while Ethan Shaw gives Hady Ghoneim a glimpse into his life. “I feel so good, I feel like a new person,” said nine-year-old Ethan, blocking punches from his […]]]>

It’s an unlikely couple, the two of them.

One a 26-year-old Egyptian fighter, the other a little boy. They practice, practice with a balance ball and practice, while Ethan Shaw gives Hady Ghoneim a glimpse into his life.

“I feel so good, I feel like a new person,” said nine-year-old Ethan, blocking punches from his much bigger opponent.

“A new person? I’m so happy to hear that, it’s amazing,” Ghoneim replies.

Ethan considers Ghoneim his best friend, and vice versa.

It’s an unlikely friendship born out of Ethan’s desire to gain confidence and protect himself from bullies.

But his training and his newfound friendship are now in jeopardy as Ghoneim makes a last ditch effort to stay in Canada.

One of the first things Hady Ghoneim did after getting off the plane in St. John’s on May 5, 2017 was to visit Signal Hill. (Submitted by Hady Ghoneim)

Ghoneim arrived in St. John’s on a sunny, warm May day in 2017 and was immediately struck by the rugged beauty of the place and the people who call it home.

“Honestly, even from the first day when I was so blessed, I met a lot of beautiful people,” Ghoneim said.

He attended Memorial University for a year and a half, but after he and his family in Egypt fell on difficult financial times, Ghoneim said he dropped out.

Later he went back to school, but it was too late.

Invoking compassionate grounds

By leaving school indefinitely — not counting scheduled school vacations — he broke a rule on his study permit that says you must stay in college.

Last February, the federal government refused his request to extend his study permit.

“I’m just living in limbo now, just waiting,” Ghoneim said. “I received several job offers which I had to refuse because I am not legally authorized to work.”

He has since hired Meghan Felt, a McInnes Cooper partner who specializes in immigration law.

“There are relatively limited options for him,” Felt said in a recent interview.

Attorney Meghan Felt is a partner at McInnes Cooper and specializes in immigration law. (Paul Pickett/CBC)

Felt has handled cases similar to Ghoneim’s and said the Canadian immigration process “isn’t lenient.”

They chose to proceed with what is called an H and C request, or humanitarian and compassionate request.

“You have to make sure you comply. And if you don’t you get out of line, it makes you ineligible. So you have to be very careful,” she said.

The process will take about two-and-a-half years, she said, and the immigration system as a whole is known to be plagued with application backlogs, even before the Russian invasion of Ukraine. adds additional pressure on the system.

According to figures provided by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, the refusal rate for humanitarian and compassionate applications has declined since 2020, when more than 60% of people who applied were refused.

In 2021, 42% of requests were refused. So far this year, the rate has dropped to 23%.

“This only applies to people with exceptional cases, who have exhausted all other options,” a spokesperson wrote in an email.

“It is a last resort and provides the opportunity to consider compelling humanitarian circumstances on a case-by-case basis. A central part of this process is to ensure that each case is assessed on its merits and given a due process, including the right of appeal.”

Felt said she will argue that Ghoneim has been of significant benefit to the community and would be an asset to the province and the country in the future.

She hopes the federal government will recognize Ghoneim’s outstanding sporting achievements and what he could do for the country.

A champion

Ghoneim has represented Newfoundland and Labrador at four national kickboxing and muay thai competitions, winning five medals. In 2019, he was invited to join the Canadian World Kickboxing Association (WKA) team.

“I’ve always – ever since I got here – always been grateful and I try to give back and show my gratitude,” he said.

“I remember my first competition, my first national championships. I took my Egyptian flag and I also took my Newfoundland flag with me, and when I won, on the podium, I was up with both flags because that’s basically what I stand for now.”

Ghoneim is currently staying in the country on a visitor’s visa while his application is pending.

His life is in limbo as he navigates what he can do within the legal parameters of living in the country. This means that he cannot work, or even compete; he no longer qualifies for the MCP and could face a hefty bill if injured.

Hady Ghoneim, 26, won several medals in kickboxing and muay thai while in Newfoundland and Labrador and represented the province in national competitions. (Submitted by Hady Ghoneim)

Ghoneim said he had trained and mentored hundreds of people during his time in Newfoundland and Labrador, but missed competing for the province.

“I just want to be able to do that again – to be able to go with my team and, you know, hopefully one day go to the Olympics or something. Why not?” said Ghoneim.

“I really believe in myself. I’m really talented and one of the best fighters out there, so I think I’ll be able to do it. But I just need some help.”

Ghoneim admits having made a mistake but pleads for leniency.

“We’re leaving our childhood friends and family and everyone behind to have a chance for better opportunities and a better life. And it’s very difficult, you know, some people’s rights here are rights. dreams at home.”

A worried mother

Last year, Suzanne Hearn met Ghoniem through a mutual friend and asked if he could mentor her son, Ethan, who had struggled socially and academically.

Hearn, who wrote a letter to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in support of Ghoneim, said his son was never able to bond with anyone through extracurricular activities, until he meets Ghoneim.

“He’s happier, he’s more confident and loves what he does and he’s excited. We’re here three days a week in the gym with Hady and it’s like he’s become a whole new person with his confidence. , even his walk,” Hearn said.

She worries about what will happen if Ethan loses one of the only male role models he has and points out the important role Ghoneim plays in the community.

Later this month, Ethan will be 10 years old. Ghoneim will be there.

“He’s a really great guy, he makes me happy,” Ethan said, as the two friends broke off practice.

Ghoneim replied, “You make me happy too, buddy, I’m grateful to have met you.”

Learn more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

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Canada and Denmark end decades-long dispute over Arctic waste rock | Arctic https://celenire.com/canada-and-denmark-end-decades-long-dispute-over-arctic-waste-rock-arctic/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 17:09:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/canada-and-denmark-end-decades-long-dispute-over-arctic-waste-rock-arctic/ It has been described by some as a “pseudo-confrontation”, and by others as a diplomatic ulterior motive. Now, however, the so-called “Whiskey War,” which was never really a conflict, has finally been resolved with the formal division of a tiny, barren Arctic island between Canada and Denmark. Located in the Kennedy Channel of Nares Strait […]]]>

It has been described by some as a “pseudo-confrontation”, and by others as a diplomatic ulterior motive. Now, however, the so-called “Whiskey War,” which was never really a conflict, has finally been resolved with the formal division of a tiny, barren Arctic island between Canada and Denmark.

Located in the Kennedy Channel of Nares Strait between the northwest coast of the semi-autonomous Danish territory of Greenland and Canada’s Ellesmere Island, the uninhabited half-square-mile Hans Island is has no mineral resources or much else of interest unless you are a visiting seabird.

Shaped like a muffin and surrounded by cliffs, it was for centuries a hunting ground for the Inuit. Crucially, however, it has been at the center of a long-running border dispute between Canada and Denmark – via the Greenland Home Rule Government – Copenhagen claiming geological evidence points to Hans Island being part of Greenland – a claim dismissed by Ottawa.

Aerial view of Hans Island. Photo: Gallo Images/Getty Images

Canada and Denmark agreed in 1973 to create a border through the Nares Strait, halfway between Greenland and Canada. But they could not agree on which country would have sovereignty over Hans Island, located about 1,100 km south of the North Pole. In the end, they decided to settle the ownership issue later.

This prompted largely good-natured advocacy between the two sides, including advertisements posted on Google promoting their demands and flag-raising stunts.

The reference to the ‘Whiskey War’ came after Denmark’s Greenland Affairs Minister hoisted a Danish flag on the island in 1984, buried a bottle of Danish schnapps at the base of the mast and left a note saying: ” Welcome to the Danish island”.

The Canadians then planted their own flag and left behind a bottle of Canadian brandy. Since then, countries have alternately hoisted their flags and left bottles of various spirits in tit-for-tat motions.

Map

In 2002, Nana Flensburg was part of a Danish military crew who stood on the cliff to perform a flag-raising ceremony. The Politiken newspaper quoted her on Tuesday as saying in her diary that “among the stones in the cairns were many bottles, glasses, etc. with documents informing of previous visits to the island”.

At the height of the rivalry, the two sides took to buying ads on Google to assert their rights after Denmark said it would send a letter of protest against a 2005 visit by Canada’s defense minister to the time, Bill Graham.

Graham said that Canada had always owned the island, prompting Denmark to reply, “Hans Island is our island.” Some Canadians have in turn proposed a boycott of Danish pastries, echoing the way some Americans rejected “fries” when France refused to join coalition forces in Iraq.

Now the friction is coming to an end, with the two countries agreeing to share the tiny island in a deal to be signed later on Tuesday.

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“This sends a clear signal that it is possible to resolve border disputes … in a pragmatic and peaceful way, where all parties win,” Danish Foreign Minister Jeppe Kofod said. He said it was “an important signal now that there are a lot of wars and troubles in the world”.

The agreement will enter into force after the completion of the internal procedures of the two countries. In Denmark, the parliament must give its consent to the agreement.

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Quebec food industry faces mustard shortage https://celenire.com/quebec-food-industry-faces-mustard-shortage/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 01:30:45 +0000 https://celenire.com/quebec-food-industry-faces-mustard-shortage/ Pandemic shortages of COVID-19 and extreme weather conditions have put one of the most popular condiments in jeopardy: mustard. At the Lasalle Drive-In restaurant, customers may soon be forced to enjoy their burgers without the yellow stuff, as a shortage of mustard seeds leads to dwindling supplies and soaring prices. “Right now, we’re good for […]]]>

Pandemic shortages of COVID-19 and extreme weather conditions have put one of the most popular condiments in jeopardy: mustard.

At the Lasalle Drive-In restaurant, customers may soon be forced to enjoy their burgers without the yellow stuff, as a shortage of mustard seeds leads to dwindling supplies and soaring prices.

“Right now, we’re good for a month at least,” Drive-In co-owner George Tsimiklis said. “Every day we hear something new about the shortage.”

According to food industry analyst Sylvain Charlebois, the shortage – caused by a drought in Western Canada and flooding in Western Europe – could have different effects on different brands.

“I guess you can actually see inventory being affected for well-known brands, but you can actually find high quality,” he said.

Morehouse Foods saw the writing on the wall around Christmas.

The Montreal manufacturer has stocked up on metric tons of mustard seeds, which it now keeps in giant bins.

The company produces popular brands of yellow mustard, but 80% of its production is premium mustard, but the cost of both is rising.

“The cost of a bottle of mustard has doubled compared to last year,” said Jean-Louis Chausse, director of food sales at Morehouse.

He believes the shortage will ease in November…it’s not exactly the ideal time to barbecue, but it’s better than ever.

“What’s better than mustard on a hot dog, right? »

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Why 21 severed human feet washed up in Canada and the United States https://celenire.com/why-21-severed-human-feet-washed-up-in-canada-and-the-united-states/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 17:30:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/why-21-severed-human-feet-washed-up-in-canada-and-the-united-states/ Drone view over Home Bay on Jedediah Island, British Columbia, where the first of the area’s severed feet was found in 2007. (BWJinks, CC BY-SA 4.0) A foot washes up on a beach. Short article on local news. Another one the foot is washed. Not the matching left foot, but another right foot. Suddenly you […]]]>
Drone view over Home Bay on Jedediah Island, British Columbia, where the first of the area’s severed feet was found in 2007. (BWJinks, CC BY-SA 4.0)

A foot washes up on a beach. Short article on local news. Another one the foot is washed. Not the matching left foot, but another right foot. Suddenly you have the makings of a headline-grabbing double murder mystery.

Make it a headline Mass murder mystery. Over the past decade and a half, 21 feet have washed ashore on the shores of the Salish Sea, the body of water that straddles the Canada-US border on the Pacific coast. That’s just a foot short of an entire football team.

A botched serial killer?

Is this the work of a botched serial killer with a foot fetish? Well no. Perhaps the strangest thing about the severed feet case is that foul play was ruled out – but not before the mystery went viral, confusing people around the world and inspiring mystery writers as far as Norway.

It all started in the summer of 2007. On August 20, a girl spotted a blue and white Adidas sneaker on the shores of Jedediah Island, between mainland British Columbia and Vancouver Island. Peeking inside the shoe, she was shocked to find it contained a rotting male right foot.

Just six days later, another size 12 sneaker, this time a black and white Reebok, was found on Gabriola Island, about 30 miles to the southeast. Inside, another dilapidated male right foot. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police were baffled.

“Finding one foot is like a million to one, but finding two is madness,” RCMP spokesman Garry Cox said. “I’ve heard of dancers with two left feet, but come on.”

The case refused to cool down. Over the next year, five more severed feet appeared.

  • On February 8, 2008, another male right foot washed ashore on Valdés Island. This time a size 11.
  • On May 22, a female right foot was found on the island of Kirkland, tied up in a blue and white trainer from a brand called New Balance.
  • On June 16, two Westham Island hikers found the first left foot. It matched the right foot found earlier on Valdes Island.
  • On August 1, a camper discovered a male right foot inside a size 11 black shoe in Pysht, Washington – the first discovery on the US side of the border. With the severed feet appearing to be a Canadian thing, police suspect that currents may have carried this specimen across the international maritime boundary, just 10 miles to the north.
  • On November 11, a woman’s left foot was found in the Fraser River in Richmond. The shoe brand was New Balance. DNA testing matched it to the foot found on Kirkland Island.
severed feet

A map of where 15 Feet were found in Canada between 2007 and 2019. During the same period, an additional six Feet washed up on the US side of the maritime border. (Source: British Columbia Coroners Service)

That year, media speculation and public anxiety reached a fever pitch. Popular theories involved the aforementioned serial killer, mob hits, alien abductions and obductions (i.e. autopsies), and illegal immigrants who met their gruesome deaths in dumped containers deep in the ocean. ‘ocean. The phenomenon has even attracted hoaxes, littering shoes filled with non-human bones along the Pacific coasts of western Canada.

Three Keys to the Mystery

In 2009, only one foot was found in Canadian waters; two more in 2011 and another in 2012. (Overall, six feet would appear on the US side, including the most recent, in January 2019 on Jetty Island, just off Everett, Washington.)

Although the rate of discovery has slowed, the mystery has endured. But scientists have formulated their own theories, less spectacular than those of the media. By the time another matching pair showed up at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, just days apart in February 2016, they were pretty sure.

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Three elements were essential to finding the solution to the macabre mystery: a better understanding of the body’s decomposition in the sea, an appreciation of the changes in the footwear industry and DNA research.

First used in 1988, the “Salish Sea” is the relatively new name for a bioregion that includes three inland marine waterways straddling the Canada-United States border: the Strait of Georgia, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Puget Sound. The new name complements the old ones and does not replace them. (Credit: Atlas of the Salish Sea, Western Washington University)

Corpses in the Salish Sea

Let’s start with what happens when a dead body ends up in the ocean. (If you’re soft-tempered, avert your mind’s eye now, because the process isn’t pretty. You’ve been warned.)

Bodies do not simply decompose; when they sink, they are dismantled by scavenger creatures of the depths. These bottom feeders prefer parts of the body with softer tissue – around the orifices, but also the ankles. Research conducted in 2007 by Simon Fraser University for the Canadian police on bodily decomposition, conducted in the very waters where many feet would be found, showed that deep-dwelling fish, shrimp and crustaceans could reduce a corpse to a skeleton in less than four years. days.

While what remains of the body remains at the bottom of the sea, the gnawed feet float on the surface – at least, if they are supported by latest generation sneakers. This is because they are generally made of lighter foam than their pre-2000 counterparts, and they often also have soles that contain air pockets. Additionally, the region’s topography and prevailing westerly winds help carry wrecks and jetsams ashore around the Salish Sea.

Canada, putting its best foot forward

DNA analysis allowed the RCMP to link most of the feet to people who had been missing and presumed dead as a result of an accident or suicide. The New Balance sneakers belonged to a woman who had jumped off a bridge; the first foot from Jedediah Island was linked to a man known to suffer from depression and missing since 2004. The foot found in November 2011 matched a local fisherman who went missing in 1987. In all, three pairs of feet were “matched” to each other.

As mentioned, the last foot sneaker appeared in 2019, and given the trends in footwear, it’s unlikely to be the last. However, the phenomenon of cut feet was known locally long before modern sneaker technology made its occurrence more likely.

One incident was commemorated with its own place name. In 1887, police found a severed leg in a knee-high boot in the woods of False Creek, a narrow inlet that now separates downtown Vancouver from the West End. It was speculated that the leg had belonged to a man who had disappeared days before and was all that was left of him after an encounter with a local cougar. The local trees are gone, but the area where police made their discovery over a century ago is officially known as Leg-in-Boot Square.

A severed leg found in Vancouver in 1887 was commemorated with its own street sign: “Leg-in-Boot Square.” (Credit: Street View, Google Maps)

Strange Cards #1154

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