Quebec Canada – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 18:30:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec Canada – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 Canada near kick-off against Belgium in first World Cup game in 36 years https://celenire.com/canada-near-kick-off-against-belgium-in-first-world-cup-game-in-36-years/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 18:30:21 +0000 https://celenire.com/canada-near-kick-off-against-belgium-in-first-world-cup-game-in-36-years/ Canada are about to kick off against Belgium in their first World Cup match in 36 years. Despite various injury question marks in the days leading up to the opener, star striker Alphonso Davies and key midfielder Stephen Eustáquio were part of manager John Herdman’s starting XI. Milan Borjan got the go-ahead in goal. The […]]]>

Canada are about to kick off against Belgium in their first World Cup match in 36 years.

Despite various injury question marks in the days leading up to the opener, star striker Alphonso Davies and key midfielder Stephen Eustáquio were part of manager John Herdman’s starting XI. Milan Borjan got the go-ahead in goal.

The match kicks off at 2 p.m. ET at the Ahmad Bin Ali Stadium in Doha, Qatar.

Canada last appeared on men’s soccer’s biggest stage in 1986, where they lost three straight games without scoring a goal.

But after taking first place in CONCACAF regional qualifiers ahead of the United States, Mexico and Costa Rica, Canada should do more damage this time around. Canada booked its ticket to Qatar with a 4-0 victory over Jamaica in March in Toronto.

Armed with one of the world’s elite players in Davies, who shines at club level for Germany’s Bayern Munich, as well as Lille striker Jonathan David, the Canadian side have the talent to shake up more established opponents.

Drawn into Group F alongside second-placed Belgium, 12th-placed Croatia and 22nd-placed Morocco, the 41st-ranked Canadians have a tough road to the knockout stage.

Earlier on Wednesday, Croatia and Morocco drew scoreless.


Watch Soccer North live immediately after each of Canada’s matches on CBC Gem, CBCSports.ca and the CBC Sports YouTube channel


Meanwhile, on Tuesday, Canada asserted its claim to Qatari territory.

During qualifying, the Canadian men traveled with a sword bearing the words “Nihil timendum est”, which means “Fear nothing” in Latin. The sword is now in Qatar.

The finale of Canada Soccer’s ‘Anything is possible’ documentary series shows captain Atiba Hutchinson with his sword, surrounded by his teammates in a circle in midfield at Ahmad bin Ali Stadium on Tuesday, the day before the Cup opener of the world of Canada against Belgium.

“The dreams are all here in this stadium,” Hutchinson said. “We are here now. Let’s go and make the most of it. Let’s put our country on the map. Let’s all make each other proud, make our families proud, make everyone behind us proud.

“We’ve worked so hard to be in this position here now. So let’s go tomorrow. Let’s start flying. Let’s fly for everyone. Alright? Let’s do it boys. Tomorrow.”

Hutchinson then rams the sword into the turf to the cheers of his teammates, with injured keeper Maxime Crepeau watching from afar via a phone.

The players then huddle together with a chorus of “brothers” at three.

In March, after the Canadians qualified, coach John Herdman explained that the sword was “something that symbolizes the ‘New Canada’.

Tradition was derailed during a trip to Central America to face Costa Rica in qualifying before Jamaica’s victory.

La Nacion, a Costa Rican newspaper, reported that customs officers seized the sword when the Canadian team arrived by charter.

Canada’s national soccer team took their sword almost everywhere in World Cup qualifying, and now it’s in Qatar. (Costa Rican Ministry of Finance via The Associated Press)

Without the epee, the Canadians saw their 17-game unbeaten streak in CONCACAF qualifying ended in a 1-0 loss to Costa Rica. But there was a happy ending.

“We got it. We got it back. It was in that territory [at BMO Field]”, said a happy Herdman about the sword after the victory against Jamaica.

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The Canadian Foodgrains Bank in the list of top 10 charities in Canada for 2022 https://celenire.com/the-canadian-foodgrains-bank-in-the-list-of-top-10-charities-in-canada-for-2022/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 22:12:20 +0000 https://celenire.com/the-canadian-foodgrains-bank-in-the-list-of-top-10-charities-in-canada-for-2022/ For the fifth consecutive year, the Canadian Foodgrains Bank recognizes that it is a privilege and an honor to be one of the top 10 charities in Canada. Earlier this week, Charity Intelligence Canada’s Top 10 Impact Charities for 2022 was released. This is an annual list determined by the impact per dollar given to […]]]>

For the fifth consecutive year, the Canadian Foodgrains Bank recognizes that it is a privilege and an honor to be one of the top 10 charities in Canada.

Earlier this week, Charity Intelligence Canada’s Top 10 Impact Charities for 2022 was released. This is an annual list determined by the impact per dollar given to an organization.

According to Charity Intelligence, more than $18 billion was donated to charities by Canadian donors last year and a significant portion of that went to less effective charities.

With over 800 Canadian charities reviewed and analyzed, Charity Intelligence rates each organization on five objective aspects:

  1. Donor reports
  2. Financial transparency
  3. Need funding,
  4. pennies to the cause
  5. Demonstrated impact

“Some charities create a lot of change with the donations that come to them. Others have next to nothing to show for the money that comes from donors,” says Greg Thomson, director of research at Charity Intelligence. “Of the 300 Canadian charities we analyzed for impact, these Top 10 have the highest measurably demonstrated impact. Our calculations estimate that this group of Top 10 Impact Charities generates average returns of nearly $7 for every dollar donated, compared to overall average charitable returns of just $1-2.

Charities that work on the front lines of delivering social services in Canada and international programs are also among the top 10 charities. Here is a list of the Top 10 (in alphabetical order):

Table found on CharityIntelligence.ca

The Canadian Foodgrains Bank has been on the Charity Intelligence list for five years, and the organization realizes that it is an honor and a huge responsibility to be recognized for one’s work.

“We are touched and grateful to be included in this list,” said Foodgrains Bank Executive Director Andy Harrington. “As we enter our 40th year of operation, this award recognizes how we continue to work with integrity to help end hunger in the world.”

The Foodgrains Bank offers worldwide assistance in two distinct services. They provide emergency food services to people in crisis and disaster situations, and they also provide long-term support to families, including agricultural training and better nutrition.

“As the world faces an exploding hunger crisis, we hope this recognition will encourage more Canadians to join us in providing access to food. I believe that despite our differences, we can all agree that this is something that every human being should have. We know that being named one of the top 10 impact charities adds a level of confidence to our supporters when they choose to donate to the fight against world hunger. »

Click here to learn more about the Canadian Foodgrains Bank.

Click here to learn more about Charity Intelligence.

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Zakhiku: Iraq’s Ancient City Revealed by Severe Drought | Climate crisis https://celenire.com/zakhiku-iraqs-ancient-city-revealed-by-severe-drought-climate-crisis/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 09:55:44 +0000 https://celenire.com/zakhiku-iraqs-ancient-city-revealed-by-severe-drought-climate-crisis/ As the climate crisis causes water levels to drop, riverbeds to dry up and glaciers to melt, artifacts such as old warships, an ancient city and human remains have emerged. This story is part of “Climate Artifacts”, a mini-series telling the stories behind the people, places and objects that have been discovered due to drought […]]]>

As the climate crisis causes water levels to drop, riverbeds to dry up and glaciers to melt, artifacts such as old warships, an ancient city and human remains have emerged. This story is part of “Climate Artifacts”, a mini-series telling the stories behind the people, places and objects that have been discovered due to drought and warming temperatures.

Around 3,800 years ago, traders in the ancient city of Zakhiku waited for wooden beams, felled in the mountain forests of northern and eastern Mesopotamia – covering what is now Iraq , Kuwait and parts of Turkey, Iran and Syria – float on the Tigris. Once the logs reached Zakhiku, they were collected and taken to warehouses.

From the same mountainous regions of what is now Turkey and Iran, merchants carrying metals and minerals such as gold, silver, tin and copper traveled by donkey or camel ride to Zakhiku. To protect themselves from bandits, they would make the difficult journey in traveling caravans. After selling their wares in Zakhiku, the merchants would cross the Tigris before continuing to the borderlands.

Zakhiku was founded around 1800 BC. BC by the ancient Babylonian empire which reigned over Mesopotamia between the 19th and 15th centuries BC. With only water and soil in the area, Zakhiku was created to take advantage of caravan traffic and a thriving trade route in the Near East, which includes present-day Middle East, Turkey, and Egypt.

The trading post became an important trading town in the region for about 600 years before being hit by an earthquake and later abandoned.

Zakhiku disappeared completely in the 1980s, when – as part of the Mosul Dam project, built under the late Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein – it was flooded and submerged. Formerly known as Saddam’s Dam, it is Iraq’s largest and most important reservoir of water used for downstream irrigation.

Iraq is one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change, and its southern governorates, where temperatures exceed 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit) in summer, have faced severe drought since 2019, forcing farmers to give up their dying cultures. Last December, water was released from the dam to irrigate farmland.

As water levels dropped, Zakhiku emerged earlier this year in the Kurdish region of Iraq. A team of local and German archaeologists stepped in to excavate the site, uncovering new details about the city following a brief initial dig in 2018 that revealed a palace.

“With recent excavations, locals have become aware of Zakhiku; they visit the site…it was shown on local TV…and people are starting to know their story [more deeply] and they are proud of it,” says Peter Pfälzner of the University of Tübingen, Germany, an archaeologist working at the site, known as Kemune.

Zakhiku was originally founded for its location on a thriving trade route traveled by merchant caravans [Courtesy of the University of Tübingen]

A city in an unknown empire

Around 1500 BC. AD, the old Babylonian city of Zakhiku fell with its empire when the Hittites, an Indo-European group of people from Anatolia – present-day Turkey – conquered Mesopotamia, but had no interest in settling a settlement there. new administration.

As the Hittites returned to their northern lands, the Mittani Empire, originating from northeast Syria, took control of Zakhiku.

“It was an opportunity for the Mittani Empire to fill this void [left by the Hittites] to establish a very large and powerful empire,” says Pfälzner, who shared his excavation findings with Al Jazeera.

Few sites with layers or buildings that can be attributed to this empire have been discovered, and little is known about the people who lived in Zakhiku or what the population was like at its height. But the city prospered under its second reigning empire.

The majority of the empire’s population were Hurrians – like the inhabitants of northern Mesopotamia – and settled in present-day Syria and northern Iraq, and spoke a language of the same name.

Infrastructure built during Mittani’s reign and uncovered by archaeologists includes a palace for the local ruler, fortifications to protect the city against any invading force, and a huge public warehouse for goods and crops – all made from bricks molded from mud.

All this seems to have been made possible by the good relations that the local king had with the emperor. According to Pfälzner, Zakhiku was something of a vassal state for the larger empire, with the capital in modern northeast Syria.

The king’s palace was bigger than the houses, with thicker walls, larger rooms, and even sidewalks made of fired, not just dried, mud bricks sealed with bitumen – formed from oil – for l waterproofing.

With so few remains of the Mittani Empire, including its capital, having been uncovered to date, the excavations are cultivating new knowledge about the Mittani culture. “Zakhiku is very important because it opens a big window into what a Mittani town might look like,” says Pfälzner.

A photo of a view into one of the pottery vessels with cuneiform tablets, including one tablet that is still in its original clay casing.
Cuneiform tablets made during the Assyrian period of rule in the city could tell more about the impact of the earthquake that destroyed Zakhiku when it was a city of Mittani [Courtesy of the University of Tübingen]

clay posts

A key feature of Zakhiku was the warehouse which boasted rooms up to 6 m (20 ft) wide and 8 m (26 ft) long and housed heaps of wheat and barley as well as metal and imported wood.

According to Pfälzner, farmers would transport their season’s produce to the warehouse where it would be noted by state workers.

The very size of the halls reserved for public harvests indicates that the city is active and well populated.

Mesopotamia has long been known as the first place where wheat was domesticated around 10,000 years ago, and bread was the staple food of the people of Zakhiku, often eaten with large pots of soups and stews of vegetables, according to Pfälzner.

Sheep, goats, cows and pigs were also kept by each household, providing a regular source of milk and also meat, reserved for special occasions.

The Hurrian language was unknown outside the immediate area, and scribes employed for public functions throughout the state, such as in city palaces or warehouses, were educated in Akkadian, the language and lingua franca les more widespread in the ancient Near East at the end of the bronze. period that extended from 3300 BC to 1200 BC.

Using wet clay, says Pfälzner, craftsmen made square tablets 15cm by 15cm – and while the material was still wet, scribes carved notes onto anything from a log to a newly stored crop to a note destined for another realm before placing it in the sun. to dry.

An earthquake

The Mittani city of Zakhiku met a devastating end when an earthquake demolished it between 1,400 BC and 1,300 BC, according to Pfälzner, collapsing the walls around the inhabitants.

With the buildings so badly damaged, it was impossible to rebuild Zakhiku to its former eminence, and if there were any survivors, they abandoned it.

Around 1300 BC. AD, the native Assyrians of Mesopotamia settled in the same city, building their homes amid the ruins and using any structures still standing from the Mittani period as outer retaining walls.

“They created a new life in the city, it was…really nice to see how things are starting to develop again,” says Pfälzner.

Apart from those belonging to the Mittani period, the cuneiform tablets unearthed after the earthquake will hopefully tell archaeologists more about the change in the city’s regime.

Zakhiku was abandoned by the Assyrians just 50 years after their arrival, between 1270 BC and 1250 BC. They decided to build their new provincial capital, Mardaman, 25 km (15.5 miles) in the plains of Mesopotamia, in present-day Bassetki, a village in Dohuk Governorate.

The commercial center benefits that Zakhiku brought to its inhabitants in the Tigris Valley for about 600 years faded as the Assyrians – who were very careful planners – wanted to exploit the now famous fertile soil of Mesopotamia.

The move to Bassetki was for economic and strategic reasons, according to Pfälzner, since the agricultural areas were smaller along the Tigris compared to the plains fields which would yield greater economic profit.

In February, Pfälzner and the team of archaeologists halted the excavations as the waters of the dam rose again and Zakhiku disappeared under water.

Dr. Bekes Jamal Al Din, director of antiquities at the Duhok Antiquities and Heritage Directorate, which works with archaeologists, told Al Jazeera that the excavations indicate that this region exerted a powerful influence on the Mittani Empire. Yet he acknowledges that learning this history comes at a cost to the country’s water needs.

“We don’t expect the water [in the Mosul Dam] will recede again due to the importance of water to the region,” he says. “But if so, we will certainly start the excavations again, and the results will be beneficial for the history of the region.”

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Black military veteran remembered as community champion in Cape Breton https://celenire.com/black-military-veteran-remembered-as-community-champion-in-cape-breton/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/black-military-veteran-remembered-as-community-champion-in-cape-breton/ A Cape Breton veteran is remembered as someone who lifted his community but wanted little acclaim for his hard work. Lemuel Marcus Skeete’s family believe he was the last surviving African Nova Scotian veteran of World War II. During his active service, he was a military mechanic and worked on heavy machinery. He died at […]]]>

A Cape Breton veteran is remembered as someone who lifted his community but wanted little acclaim for his hard work.

Lemuel Marcus Skeete’s family believe he was the last surviving African Nova Scotian veteran of World War II. During his active service, he was a military mechanic and worked on heavy machinery.

He died at his seniors’ residence on Sunday, just months after his 100th birthday in August.

Darcy Skeete says her father said very little about his experience in the war or what he saw.

“Everything we’ve learned, we’ve learned in other ways and I don’t know if it’s just something he just didn’t want to talk about – every time we brought up the subject he snuck up. sort of took it away from it to be honest, I knew he had served in Holland and he spoke very well about the people of that area and his time there.

Lem Skeete was born in Donkin and later moved to his wife’s hometown of Whitney Pier, where he has devoted much of his life to improving the Sydney neighborhood.

Whitney Pier was once considered one of the most ethnically diverse communities in the Maritimes after welcoming thousands of immigrants who worked in the region’s former steel and coal mines.

Lemuel Skeete is shown in this undated photo from his youth. A WWII veteran, he served overseas as a mechanic and eventually opened his own garage in Cape Breton. (Submitted by Darcy Skeete)

After returning from the war, Skeete worked at the Sydney Steelworks and later joined several local garages before opening his own mechanical workshop late in life.

“He was a very honest person,” Skeete said of his father. “He went out of his way to help people, to try to save them money. He didn’t like anybody being taken advantage of or anything like that.”

Skeete was well known for his community involvement after founding a child care center in Whitney Pier to help working mothers. He was instrumental in establishing after-school youth programs and a community softball league.

He was also a member of several cultural associations and black volunteer groups. He helped start the non-profit housing society Whitney Pier, which built affordable homes in the area. Over the years, he has received the Tom Miller Human Rights Award from the Cape Breton Regional Municipality and received an honorary degree from the Nova Scotia Community College.

A neighbor in the Whitney Pier community of Skeete, Iris Crawford, said her impact will continue to be felt for many years to come.

“A great activist for our black community — he did more for people than people really knew,” Crawford said. “As far as I’m concerned, our community has lost a great leader. He was an icon and you know he will be missed. Our community was a much better place because of him.”

Skeete leaves behind his wife of 72 years and three sons.

Veterans Affairs in Ottawa says there are only 25,500 living veterans in Canada who served in World War II or the Korean War.

For more stories about the experiences of Black Canadians — from anti-Black racism to stories of success within the Black community — check out Being Black in Canada, a CBC project that Black Canadians can be proud of. You can read more stories here.

(Radio Canada)
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Anchorage Zen Community seeks awareness in the silence of winter https://celenire.com/anchorage-zen-community-seeks-awareness-in-the-silence-of-winter/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 02:35:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/anchorage-zen-community-seeks-awareness-in-the-silence-of-winter/ For more than three decades, members of Anchorage’s Zen community have gathered in unusual places — from a bustling mall to a converted garage — with the same intention: to simply sit and meditate in silence. More nomadic, they found peace and stability in a small zendo, or meditation hall, nestled on the edge of […]]]>

For more than three decades, members of Anchorage’s Zen community have gathered in unusual places — from a bustling mall to a converted garage — with the same intention: to simply sit and meditate in silence.

More nomadic, they found peace and stability in a small zendo, or meditation hall, nestled on the edge of two neighborhoods in Alaska’s most populous city and epicenter of urban culture.

Being a Buddhist in Anchorage is both universal in practice and unique to life in Alaska. Anchorage’s Zen community is influenced by the northernmost state’s seasonal rhythms, which include long, dark winters and short summers when the sun only dips below the horizon for brief periods, said Genmyo Jana Zeedyk, who has been the resident priest for over a year. decade.

Alaskan winters, she says, are actually conducive to sitting meditation in Zen Buddhism, or zazen, a practice they believe can help them achieve a greater sense of self.

“People have a very active and sporty life in the snow, but when the activities slow down, it gives more opportunities for zazen,” she said. “There’s the calm that comes with the snow – the conditions make it easier to be inside and sit down.”

Noise, family, responsibilities, nothing stands in the way of their zazen, which began when the community was founded in 1986 after meeting informally for years with followers of other branches of Buddhism.

Resident priest of the Anchorage Zen Community, Genmyo Jana Zeedyk, bows to a Buddha statue during a Sunday practice at the Anchorage Zen Community. (Jae C. Hong/Associated Press)

On a recent day, Zeedyk entered the zendo, bowed to a wooden statue of the Buddha, then to members of the community, before sitting down on a round pillow. Dressed in long black and brown robes, she closed her eyes when a member of the group rang a bell signaling the start of the meditation.

Inside, only the inhaling and exhaling of single breaths and the occasional cough could be heard as silence shrouded the room. Outside, a plane roared above the sprawling metropolis. Anchorage is home to around 300,000 people and the starting point for waves of tourists and outdoor enthusiasts seeking faraway experiences in a romanticized state for its winters and adventures in the nearby mountains.

The long, sunny days of summer also provide Anchorage’s Zen community with a chance to practice meditation while walking in nearby parks, Zeedyk said.

“Zazen works best when practiced regularly, day after day,” said Judith Haggar, the center’s treasurer.

“However, in the summer, when the light seems to be everywhere, zazen seems to have a stabilizing influence amidst all the energy of 19 hours of daylight.”

A woman walks down the street dressed in long clothes.
Zeedyk walks past the zendo, or meditation hall, in Anchorage. (Jae C. Hong/Associated Press)

Back at the zendo, several minutes passed until zen clappers clapped, and the dozen people around her in the zendo got up and started walking slowly in circles. At the end, Zeedyk reflected on how practitioners can find steady, stable awareness and compassion in their daily tasks – taking out the trash, sweeping up dog hair, washing dishes.

Yaso Thiru, a member of the group, said that message resonated with her: “What I really like about this practice is that, as she said, it’s not like withdrawing from this world. .It’s about being part of this world and being a practitioner.”

Thiru grew up in a Hindu family in Sri Lanka, a predominantly Buddhist country. She became interested in Buddhism and joined the Anchorage group after the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic.

A sense of community is vital in sparsely populated Alaska, which is about one-fifth the size of all of the lower 48 states, Zeedyk said. Due to higher costs and limited supplies in this massive, remote state, they embrace an interdependent, makeshift philosophy for the benefit of their Buddhist community, she said.

A route inside a workbook.
A timer and clappers, used to signal time for rest and walking during meditation, are placed next to a program at the Anchorage Zen Community. (Jae C. Hong/Associated Press)

“What’s unique about our community is that we’re far from everywhere and there’s always this commitment to come here, to practice in this very remote place,” Zeedyk said.

Their work goes beyond the walls of zendo. They offered a dharma school for children and do community outreach by cleaning streams, organizing community potlucks and visiting prisoners to share the Buddha’s teachings.

Meditation has been a transformative experience for many women in prison, Haggar said. For more than two decades, she and other members of the community have taught zazen, yoga and dharma to women at the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center. The program was halted during the coronavirus pandemic.

People meditate in a room near a Buddha statue.
Resident priest Genmyo Jana Zeedyk, second from left, and other members of the Anchorage Zen community meditate during a Sunday service in Anchorage, Alaska on October 9. (Jae C. Hong/Associated Press)

“It was an education for me… It wasn’t holy of me at all. I absolutely loved going there,” Haggar said. “We had the most wonderful discussions. We connected on so many levels and it made my life so much better.”

As the meditation recently wrapped up at the Anchorage zendo, she said goodbye to the others. Brian Schumaker, who calls himself a beginning practitioner, reflected on the benefits of zazen in a frenetic world full of distractions.

“Nowadays we all hear so many words, we hear our monkey mind and it’s all crazy. Everything beeps you,” he said. “And if we’re going to be centered and present, then for me, it’s beneficial to take time away from all that stuff.”

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Toronto’s ‘human library’ tackles ageism in Canada https://celenire.com/torontos-human-library-tackles-ageism-in-canada/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 01:45:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/torontos-human-library-tackles-ageism-in-canada/ A Toronto public library is trying to combat Canadian ageism through storytelling – allowing library visitors to “check out” seniors for 30-minute conversations. This ‘human library’ initiative, called ‘UnJudge Aging’, was the first step in a larger campaign to demystify discrimination against Canada’s older population, providing seniors with an opportunity to explain who they are […]]]>

A Toronto public library is trying to combat Canadian ageism through storytelling – allowing library visitors to “check out” seniors for 30-minute conversations.

This ‘human library’ initiative, called ‘UnJudge Aging’, was the first step in a larger campaign to demystify discrimination against Canada’s older population, providing seniors with an opportunity to explain who they are and where they come from.

The event took place Saturday at the North District Library, part of the Toronto Public Library System. It was meant to open the dialogue to an important demographic of Canadians who, according to one researcher, are largely shunned.

“Ageism is a huge issue,” Lyn MacDonald, professor and co-director of the Institute for Life Course and Aging Collaborative Program at the University of Toronto, told CTVNews.ca by phone ahead of the event. “Nobody wants to talk about it. [Many Canadians] don’t care about old people.

MacDonald, the principal researcher behind the “UnJudge Aging” program, hoped that giving older people the space to tell their stories would deepen the connections and close the gaps that alienate and isolate an aging community.

According to MacDonald’s research, six in ten seniors over the age of 66 say they have been treated unfairly because of their age. Seven in 10 agree that Canadian society values ​​younger generations more than older generations, which triggers psychological distress and social isolation, she said.

MacDonald explained that common behaviors toward the elderly damage older adults’ self-esteem and promote unhealthy attitudes toward aging.

“It causes depression. It causes withdrawal. It causes all kinds of problems,” MacDonald said.

She explained that research has proven that promoting spaces for dialogue is an effective way to tackle general discrimination. The concept of the “human library,” she said, has already been applied to many marginalized communities.

“‘Human libraries’ are now being used by companies as a much more effective way to fight discrimination,” MacDonald said. “No one ever did it for ageism.”

Participants in the Human Library event, referred to as ‘readers’, were interviewed prior to their engagement with elders, referred to as ‘books’.

A questionnaire booklet titled “Relating to Old People Evaluation” was given to readers to complete before their conversations, with the aim of determining any biases that might negatively or positively affect interactions.

The survey included questions such as: “Do you tell an older person that they ‘don’t look that old’ when you find out their age?” and “Do you send birthday cards to old people who joke about their age?”

MacDonald explained that ageist tendencies are often rooted in cultural interactions, enforcing — sometimes unwittingly — discriminatory behaviors that deliver a damaging trope: older people don’t matter.

BOOKS’

Renee Climans, a social worker at Baycrest Hospital in Toronto, was one of the main event coordinators, helping to select a list of more than 15 seniors with compelling stories to share.

“The main idea behind the project was to really reframe aging and see older people as capable and effective,” she told CTVNews.ca by phone.

Climans sought to find senior participants who covered a wide range of life experiences. Among them were a lawyer-turned-artist, a hospice health worker, a renewable energy advocate, a journalist, and a few published authors.

These “books,” Climans said, express the lives of older people that are far broader than the limiting stereotypes attributed to older people.

One of the seniors, Kaye Joachim, is from Sri Lanka, and she told readers that she grew up in Canada and how her life as an immigrant helped shape her self-esteem.

Another “book”, Michael Gordon, a geriatrician, told readers about his experience growing up in Brooklyn and later traveling through Europe. He studied medicine in Scotland and moved to Canada during the Vietnam War.

Attendee Karen Weiler spoke about her career in law and how aging gracefully has become a big part of her retirement.

“Don’t let others define who you are and what you can do,” Weiler told readers.

“The results have been very positive,” Climans told CTVNews.ca after the event.

MacDonald said the experience helped seniors feel a sense of empowerment.

“Someone really listened to them for a change and appreciated what they had to say,” she said.

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National Geographic includes Canadian experience in top 25 https://celenire.com/national-geographic-includes-canadian-experience-in-top-25/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 02:01:10 +0000 https://celenire.com/national-geographic-includes-canadian-experience-in-top-25/ The Canadian experience was on a list of only 25 breathtaking places in the world. National Geographic has included Indigenous tourist outfitters in Alberta, Canada, among its Top 25 Breathtaking Places and Experiences for 2023. The 25 destinations are selected by the global editors of the international publication and framed by five categories: Community, Nature, […]]]>

The Canadian experience was on a list of only 25 breathtaking places in the world.

National Geographic has included Indigenous tourist outfitters in Alberta, Canada, among its Top 25 Breathtaking Places and Experiences for 2023.

The 25 destinations are selected by the global editors of the international publication and framed by five categories: Community, Nature, Culture, Family and Adventure.

The experiences of Indigenous tourism providers in Alberta were chosen as places to “discover how longstanding traditions and contemporary perspectives intersect”.

Weasel Tail Enterprises, for example, offers Indigenous activities and experiences in the beautiful foothills of the Rocky Mountains. They chat in their teepee and practice hiking, horseback riding and swimming. There are also various Aboriginal guided activities.

Check out the full list of the top 25 destinations selected by National Geographic.

  1. Visit Karpathos, Greece, and discover the Dodecanese Islands, “where women-led businesses are leading the charge in sustainable tourism.”
  2. Visit the Great Lakes city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which celebrates its cultural community as much as its breweries.
  3. Discover Aboriginal tourist outfitters in Alberta, Canada.
  4. Board a new high-speed train that transports travelers to lesser-known parts of Laos.
  5. Visit Ghana to learn about black heritage and “hang out with a fashion-forward crowd in the capital, Accra.”
  6. Learn about Botswana’s mesmerizing biodiversity and learn about programs for “rehabilitation of endangered species, creation of wildlife corridors and development of community-owned tourism projects”.
  7. Explore the Scottish Highlands, where conservation efforts strive to restore the original landscape and native flora and fauna.
  8. Cycle through Slovenia on new gourmet cycling routes that visit farms, vineyards, cheese makers and other food producers.
  9. Visit Big Bend National Park in Texas where you will experience the “frontier legend” of the southern state.
  10. The Azores, an autonomous region of Portugal, includes a volcanic archipelago popular for whale watching and thermal springs.
  11. Travel back in time to Egypt to discover ancient wonders including King Tut’s New Home at the Grand Egyptian Museum in Cairo and the Avenue of the Sphinxes in Luxor.
  12. Experience the creative energy of Asia’s best film festival and sip craft beer in Busan, South Korea.
  13. Probably the oldest road in the world, the Appian Way in Italy is considered the ancient “highway” of Europe. It was also a key military and economic artery for ancient Rome.
  14. Want to savor delicious country cuisine accompanied by a bit of culture and history? Visit the International African American Museum in Charleston, South Carolina.
  15. See some of the world’s largest stone statue assemblages in China’s Henan province at Longmen Grottoes, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  16. Ride the rails to quaint alpine towns in Switzerland for chocolate, hiking, and skiing.
  17. You can help conserve turtles in Trinidad and Tobago, which is one of the largest leatherback turtle colonies in the world.
  18. In San Francisco, California, gather around a campfire overlooking the Golden Gate at “Presidio Tunnel Tops and hike the Crosstown Urban Trail.”
  19. Colombia is a birdwatching paradise, with a huge range of brightly colored feathered creatures to observe. It’s also Disney’s Enchanted Land Canto.
  20. Travel to Manchester, England to visit the grounds of a world famous football team and also be inspired by the city’s vibrant art scene.
  21. Visit the remote Inca site of Choquequirao, Peru. Some say it even rivals Machu Picchu and will soon be more accessible to hikers.
  22. Discover adrenaline-pumping activities across New Zealand, the island nation that invented bungee jumping.
  23. Don’t discount the less popular adventure tourist sites. Utah is home to a range of thrilling activities.
  24. In Austria, visitors can hike “the network of mountaineering villages Bergsteigerdörfer to sample [the] local culture.”
  25. With protected waters supported by National Geographic’s Pristine Seas initiative, Mexico’s Revillagigedo National Park is home to one of the largest aggregations of sharks and manta rays in the world.

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Canada Soccer urged to join Qatar World Cup migrant worker compensation claim https://celenire.com/canada-soccer-urged-to-join-qatar-world-cup-migrant-worker-compensation-claim/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 00:56:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/canada-soccer-urged-to-join-qatar-world-cup-migrant-worker-compensation-claim/ Canada Soccer is urged to back calls to compensate migrant workers whose work made the next World Cup in Qatar a reality – and cost some of them their lives. Hundreds of thousands of migrant workers have been involved in the preparation for the next World Cup, according to Amnesty International. The human rights organization […]]]>

Canada Soccer is urged to back calls to compensate migrant workers whose work made the next World Cup in Qatar a reality – and cost some of them their lives.

Hundreds of thousands of migrant workers have been involved in the preparation for the next World Cup, according to Amnesty International.

The human rights organization wants US$440 million – a total of the World Cup prize money – to compensate workers who suffered human rights abuses while working on projects in the years leading up to the tournament.

But so far, Canada‘s sports governing body has remained silent on the issue. This has prompted football fans and human rights advocates to speak out against the organization’s lack of commitment.

WATCH | Human rights concerns persist in Qatar ahead of the World Cup:

World Cup in Qatar comes under scrutiny for human rights issues

As Qatar prepares to host the men’s FIFA World Cup in a month, concerns persist over human rights in the conservative Muslim country. Global Affairs warns Canadians traveling to Qatar that LGBTQ2 travelers could face discrimination or even detention.

“Very disappointing”

“This is not only surprising but very disappointing,” said Ketty Nivyabandi, Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada.

Nivyabandi said at least seven national football associations – including the United States, England, France and the Netherlands – have spoken out on the issue. But not Canada’s own team, nor its governing body.

Ketty Nivyabandi, secretary general of Amnesty International Canada, thinks many Canadian football fans want their national team “to speak out against these violations and recognize that this is happening at the expense of migrant workers in Qatar”. (Christian Patry/Radio Canada)

She believes that many football fans want their national team to “stand up against these violations and recognize that this is happening at the expense of migrant workers in Qatar”.

Canada Soccer did not respond to a request for comment from CBC News on Thursday.

A men’s national team player, Lucas Cavallini, told CBC News he hasn’t had a conversation with other players about the controversies in Qatar.

“We’re all basically distracted by the tournament and the way things are going for us and we’re just worried about playing football… We’re here to be in a tournament so that’s basically all we have to worry about. focus.”

The issue has taken on greater importance with members of the Denmark national team, whose players will have another shirt to wear to pay tribute to migrant workers who have lost their lives.

The “alarmed” fan club

A large group of national team supporters in Canada, known as the Voyageurs, are calling on both the organization and the national team to step up.

The Voyageurs told CBC News that their members had to weigh their concerns about the treatment of migrants in Qatar against a desire to support their national team.

The Lusail Stadium in Qatar is under construction as of December 2019. The 2022 FIFA World Cup Final is scheduled to be held at the facilities. (Hassan Ammar/Associated Press)

“Our goal is to cheer on our players wherever they play. In qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup, that means supporting our men’s team in Qatar,” the fan club said in a statement.

“Human rights issues and the treatment of migrant workers have been well documented,” the statement said, noting that this meant club members had to make personal decisions about whether to travel to Qatar.

Travelers also expressed concern about other human rights issues in Qatar, beyond those directly related to preparations for the football tournament.

“We are alarmed by the Qatari government’s treatment of the LGBTQ+ population in the country and the many deaths that have occurred during the construction of World Cup stadiums and infrastructure,” the club said, saying it joined other public calls for compensation. families of deceased migrant workers.

WATCH | Video of an Australian team criticizing Qatar’s human rights record:

Australia’s World Cup squad release video criticizing Qatar’s human rights record

The Australian men’s football team, the Socceroos, has released a protest video denouncing Qatar’s treatment of migrant workers and LGBTQ+ people. The World Cup kicks off in Qatar on November 20.

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Satellite telemetry data shows narwhals alter seasonal migration patterns in response to climate change https://celenire.com/satellite-telemetry-data-shows-narwhals-alter-seasonal-migration-patterns-in-response-to-climate-change/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 14:31:07 +0000 https://celenire.com/satellite-telemetry-data-shows-narwhals-alter-seasonal-migration-patterns-in-response-to-climate-change/ Narwhals. Credit: Glenn Williams, public domain A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Canada and Denmark has found evidence that narwhals have changed their seasonal migration patterns in response to global warming. In their article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesthe group describes how they compared satellite data showing narwhal […]]]>

Narwhals. Credit: Glenn Williams, public domain

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Canada and Denmark has found evidence that narwhals have changed their seasonal migration patterns in response to global warming. In their article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesthe group describes how they compared satellite data showing narwhal movements, with Arctic ice and temperature data over a 21-year period and what they learned in doing so.

Previous research has shown that many land animals and birds have changed their migration patterns as the planet warms. But, as the researchers in this new effort note, little research has been done on whether sea creatures do the same. To find out, they conducted a study of narwhals, which live in ice-free areas near the coasts of Russia, Canada and Greenland during the warm months, then move to deeper waters in the fall. , where they spend the winter.

The researchers’ job was to study satellite images that showed a pod of 40 narwhals migrating over the years 1997 to 2018. This showed that the unicorn-like little horned whales had changed their migration patterns. They moved their summer migration dates later in the summer by about 10 days for each of the decades studied.

For the entire period, they delayed their migrations by 17 days. Suspecting that the changes in migration patterns were due to global warming, the researchers then looked at the degree of warming in the Arctic and the changes caused by global warming. They found reductions in sea ice patterns corresponding to the delays of the narwhals.

The researchers note that narwhals are long-lived creatures, which generally means they are less able to adapt to rapidly changing conditions, at least from an evolutionary perspective. But, because they live 50 to 100 years, they also have the ability to learn over time. Most of the ones they studied were the same whales, and they very clearly learned to adapt on the fly.

This suggests that they have some degree of ability to change in order to respond to upcoming changes. But, the researchers also note, they may face other problems. Leaving the coast later in the summer could lead to being trapped and suffocating in the pack ice, for example. It could also expose them more to predators, such as killer whales.


A study of the past suggests that the future of narwhals is uncertain


More information:
Courtney R. Shuert et al, The decadal migration phenology of a long-lived Arctic icon keeps pace with climate change, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2022). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2121092119

© 2022 Science X Network

Quote: Satellite telemetry data shows narwhals alter seasonal migration patterns in response to climate change (2022, October 25) Retrieved October 25, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-10-satellite- telemetry-narwhals-seasonal-migration. html

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Food waste in Canada is not only shocking, it’s downright scary! https://celenire.com/food-waste-in-canada-is-not-only-shocking-its-downright-scary/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/food-waste-in-canada-is-not-only-shocking-its-downright-scary/ HelloFresh haunts the streets of Toronto with the launch of its food waste cemetery TORONTO, October 21, 2022 /CNW/ – www.hellofresh.ca HelloFresh is mourning the loss of food that went too soon with the launch of its food waste graveyard. The pop-up activation located at Lawrence Park (55 Glengowan Road) symbolizes all the wasted food […]]]>

HelloFresh haunts the streets of Toronto with the launch of its food waste cemetery

TORONTO, October 21, 2022 /CNW/ – www.hellofresh.ca HelloFresh is mourning the loss of food that went too soon with the launch of its food waste graveyard. The pop-up activation located at Lawrence Park (55 Glengowan Road) symbolizes all the wasted food “put to rest”.

GORGEOUS FACTS ABOUT FOOD WASTE:

    • The average Canadian household generates 372 pounds of preventable food waste each year. This is the equivalent of 31 (12 pounds) pumpkins per year.
    • In Canadanearly 2.2 million tons of edible food are wasted each year.

A FOOD WASTE CEMETERY

This room Toronto home will be the entire cemetery, complete with tombstones that share relatable and chilling truths that are easy to digest. The Food Waste Cemetery will be open to the public from friday 21 october at monday 31 october.

Not scared yet? from Canada the annual cost of food loss and waste is greater than $1,700 per household. It equals that all-inclusive trip you have in mind or the laptop your child needs for school.

“We’ve all tried a new recipe that calls for ¼ cup of fresh cilantro. You buy it fresh, cook the dish, and then you end up with an almost full pile of leftover cilantro that will probably end up unused and in the trash in a matter of days,” says HelloFresh Corby-Sue Neumann, Kitchen Manager at HelloFresh Canada.

THE FACTS ARE SCARY

A bunch of herbs might not seem like a lot, but it adds up. A recent study found that food waste across the country is costing Canadians more than $20 billion.1

“With pre-portioned fresh ingredients and easy recipes delivered right to your door, HelloFresh is giving Canadians real meal solutions that save 36% less food waste compared to the traditional way of shopping and cooking for the Canadians who cook with HelloFresh not only do their part in reducing food waste, but they also save money,” adds Corby-Sue.

A recent investigationdriven by from Dalhousie University Agri-Food Analytics Lab, found that 40% of Canadians said they were trying to waste less food now compared to 12 months ago. The study also found that reducing food waste is the number one thing consumers do to cut costs.

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1https://lovefoodhatewaste.ca/about/food-waste/#:~:text=In%202022%20the%20National%20Zero,more%20than%20%241%2C300%20per%20year

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN IN THE GRAND SCHEME OF THINGS?

When wasted food ends up in local landfills or, in our case, cemeteries, the rotting waste produces methane, a greenhouse gas even more potent than carbon dioxide. HelloFresh produces less greenhouse gas emissions after a meal is finished. Leftover HelloFresh meals generate 29% fewer emissions compared to a meal prepared without Hellofresh. This is due to precisely dosed ingredients as well as vegetarian meal options, which give customers the opportunity to further reduce their carbon footprint.

To learn more about how HelloFresh is helping Canadians reduce household food waste, please visit https://www.hellofresh.ca/foodwasteisscary

For more information, visit HelloFresh.ca

About HelloFresh Canada

HelloFresh Canada was founded in February 2016. HelloFresh delivers “cooked-from-scratch” meal plans right to your doorstep with carefully curated, easy-to-follow recipe cards and pre-portioned fresh locally sourced ingredients in the right amounts. HelloFresh helps reduce food waste and takes care of meal planning, shopping, measuring and delivery, leaving you time to do the fun parts: cooking and eating. HelloFresh caters to a variety of needs by offering Pronto, Family and Veggie boxes. HelloFresh delivers everywhere Canada. In the three month period between October 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020HelloFresh delivered 179 million meals to 5.29 million active customers worldwide.

SOURCE HelloFresh Canada

For further information: Press Contacts: Kate Carnegie, KC Media, Owner, (905) 650-7622, [email protected]

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