Quebec Canada – Celenire http://celenire.com/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 10:10:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://celenire.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Quebec Canada – Celenire http://celenire.com/ 32 32 How a sailboat helped Canada drop ocean sensors in the distant South Atlantic to study climate change https://celenire.com/how-a-sailboat-helped-canada-drop-ocean-sensors-in-the-distant-south-atlantic-to-study-climate-change/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://celenire.com/how-a-sailboat-helped-canada-drop-ocean-sensors-in-the-distant-south-atlantic-to-study-climate-change/ Canada is joining an unusual mission to measure climate change in the Atlantic Ocean — using a 24-meter sailboat to deploy robotic sensors. The French sailboat Iris is currently in the South Atlantic in the middle of a three-month voyage that will release 100 autonomous sensors, including ten from Canada, to measure ocean conditions. Canadian […]]]>

Canada is joining an unusual mission to measure climate change in the Atlantic Ocean — using a 24-meter sailboat to deploy robotic sensors.

The French sailboat Iris is currently in the South Atlantic in the middle of a three-month voyage that will release 100 autonomous sensors, including ten from Canada, to measure ocean conditions.

Canadian researcher Blair Greenan says it’s cheap, it’s green and it solves a problem caused by the pandemic.

“As with most things during COVID, our offshore operations have been disrupted. This initiative came to fruition by looking at other opportunities to deploy these floats,” says Greenan, who is based at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Halifax.

“It’s also using a low-carbon approach to deploying these instruments in the water where we normally use large research vessels.”

Sensors send climate data to the satellite

The sensors gradually descend two kilometers below surface level and return to the summit, taking temperature and salinity measurements along the way. Every ten days, the float breaks the surface to upload data to a satellite. The information is used by meteorologists and scientists who can map ocean warming in real time.

The research is part of the Argo program, a network of 3,800 floating sensors around the world.

This low-carbon research mission is part of a partnership between the private oceanographic company Blue Observer, the United States, Canada and Europe. (Natalie Renier/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute)

“It really revolutionized our knowledge of the ocean because before that we were dependent on research vessels going out and sampling the ocean and that was only done for a limited part of the year,” says Greenan, who is the Canadian manager of the Argo Program.

“We are able to monitor the evolution of the ocean in real time; we are actually seeing that … the ocean is warming over time.”

The partners

A private company, Blue Observer, owns the yacht. Canada, the United States and the European Union supply the floats, which cost around $25,000 each.

The first leg of the mission began in Brest, France, in November and saw 17 floats dropped in the mid-Atlantic for the European Union.

Last month, Iris docked at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts to resupply and pick up more floats, including those sent by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) to Nova Scotia.

The crew aboard the Iris deploys one of the Argo floats. (Blue Observer)

Around 1,000 Argo profiling floats are to be dropped each year to support the Global Ocean Observing System, a program of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and part of UNESCO.

And the yacht can go to places that are difficult for research vessels to visit.

Iris has crossed the equator since leaving Massachusetts and is heading for St. Helena Island, 1,950 kilometers west of the nearest landfall in southern Africa. It is the remote island where Napoleon Bonaparte was exiled.

Then, Iris will head to Namibia.

Floats deployed in 2022 to have more sensors

The use of the sailboat is also with a daily rate that is a fraction of the $50,000 per day it can cost for research vessel time.

DFO has deployed 600 Argo floats off Canada over the past 20 years — on the West Coast, in the Labrador Sea and off the Scotian Shelf south of Nova Scotia.

Each year, between 20 and 40 are deployed to replace sensors that are retired.

This year, floats deployed in the Labrador Sea or on the Scotian Shelf will carry more advanced sensors that also measure biological and chemical conditions: for example pH levels, which can indicate acidification as the ocean absorbs more of carbon dioxide.

Improved sensors can cost up to $100,000 each.

The 24-meter sailboat will spend around 100 days at sea, deploying Argo floats in support of ocean, weather and climate research. (Blue Observer)

Greenan says there’s no substitute for searching at sea, but floats are good business.

They provide data every 10 days for about five years – around 200 ocean profiles – at a cost of around $125 per ocean profile from the standard sensor.

“It can’t completely replace the data we can collect from a ship, but it’s certainly an exceptionally cost-effective way to acquire data,” says Greenan.

A legacy of the 2018 G7 Summit hosted by Canada

For Canada, the Iris mission is a legacy of the 2018 G7 summit hosted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Quebec City.

The summit is best known for the early departure of Donald Trump and the insults directed at Trudeau.

But at the meeting, Canada pledged to advance international cooperation in the oceans.

And one of the initiatives was to strengthen partnerships in the Argo program.

MORE STORIES

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Coronavirus: Omicron at the forefront in certain provinces https://celenire.com/coronavirus-omicron-at-the-forefront-in-certain-provinces/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 09:20:27 +0000 https://celenire.com/coronavirus-omicron-at-the-forefront-in-certain-provinces/ The fifth wave of the Omicron-fueled COVID-19 pandemic appears to be peaking in some provinces, while others say the worst is likely yet to come. The Saskatchewan Health Authority says it is preparing for a surge in COVID-19-related hospitalizations and absenteeism among workers through mid-February, while Alberta says hospitalization rates are rising to levels not […]]]>

The fifth wave of the Omicron-fueled COVID-19 pandemic appears to be peaking in some provinces, while others say the worst is likely yet to come.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority says it is preparing for a surge in COVID-19-related hospitalizations and absenteeism among workers through mid-February, while Alberta says hospitalization rates are rising to levels not seen since mid-October.

The rising number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in Prince Edward Island has prompted the province to reduce the size of gatherings and close gymnasiums and restaurant dining areas until at least the end of the month.

Even as they both set new records for hospitalizations, officials in Ontario and Quebec say the daily rate appears to be falling slightly, though they warn the health care system remains under enormous strain.

There are 3,417 COVID patients in Quebec hospitals, while Ontario has 4,183, including 580 people in intensive care.

British Columbia has recorded 1,975 cases of COVID-19 with 854 people hospitalized, as the province’s top doctor described his decision to allow gyms and other fitness facilities to reopen on Thursday as a ‘cautious step’ to lift restrictions related to COVID-19.

Dr Bonnie Henry said a proof of vaccination card will still be required to use gyms, and facilities will have to operate within capacity limits and provide seven square meters for each person exercising.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on January 19, 2022.

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Weather Watch: What You Need to Know About Ontario’s Winter Blast https://celenire.com/weather-watch-what-you-need-to-know-about-ontarios-winter-blast/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 17:30:09 +0000 https://celenire.com/weather-watch-what-you-need-to-know-about-ontarios-winter-blast/ The last: Residents of a large swath of southern Ontario were grappling with heavy snowfall on Monday as a winter storm triggered school closures, cancellations and a police recall to avoid travel unnecessary. Environment Canada’s weather alerts ranged from snowfall warnings to storm warnings. Toronto and Hamilton were under a blizzard warning at one point […]]]>

The last:

Residents of a large swath of southern Ontario were grappling with heavy snowfall on Monday as a winter storm triggered school closures, cancellations and a police recall to avoid travel unnecessary.

Environment Canada’s weather alerts ranged from snowfall warnings to storm warnings. Toronto and Hamilton were under a blizzard warning at one point early Monday, but as of 11:30 a.m., forecasters had major urban centers under a winter storm warning, with between 40 and 60 centimeters of snowfall expected.

“Local blowing snow due to winds up to 60 km/h which will significantly reduce visibility,” the storm warning for Toronto said.

The City of Toronto has urged people to stay home if they can.

Earlier, the Toronto District School Board said on Twitter that “all schools will switch to remote learning“Because of the weather conditions. Toronto Catholic District School Board made a similar move, saying: “Due to weather, all school bus transportation has been canceled and schools are closed for in-person learning today. Staff and students will continue to remain engaged in distance learning at home.”

The closures weren’t just affecting Toronto public schools — some post-secondary schools canceled in-person classes on Monday, and library branches were also closed due to weather conditions.

Toronto Public Health also announced that COVID-19 vaccination clinics would be closed, with people being asked to book online.

The most recent alert for the city of hamilton also showed a winter storm warning, with the same amount of snow expected.

“The rapid accumulation of snow will make travel difficult. Road closures are possible,” the statement warned.

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board announced early Monday that there would be no in-person or distance learning. For Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board students, in-class classes have been canceled, but some remote learning has continued.

“Transportation is canceled and HWCDSB schools are closed for in-person learning today, Monday January 17, due to inclement weather,” the Hamilton Catholic Board said in a tweet. “Virtual Elementary School remains open. In-person students can expect to have asynchronous assignments posted by 10 a.m.”

In the niagara region, where some areas were under a winter storm warning, the District School Board of Niagara declared a snow day, with remote and in-person learning pending.

“2022 begins strangely” the council said in a tweet earlier Monday. “We know many of you were ready to go to school today, but it’s officially a long weekend, so we really hope you enjoy it!”

the Niagara Catholic District School Board also canceled in-person school and virtual elementary school.

Winter storm warnings were in effect for parts of Waterloo Wellington, according to the updated forecast messages. Winter storm warnings were also in effect for parts of Halton and Peel regions, as well as parts of york and Durham Regions.

In the London area, there have been school bus cancellations due to winter weather.

In Ottawa, forecasters expected a total snowfall of between 25 and 40 centimeters.

“Heavy snowfall with snowfall peaks of 7-10cm per hour this morning,” said a statement released around 9:30 a.m. ET.

Blizzard warnings were in effect for parts of the capital region, with the worst conditions expected between Monday morning and noon. City officials held a noon Monday briefing and warned it would take days to clean up, given the scale of the storm.

In Ottawa, the two Ottawa Catholic School Board and the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board will turn to remote learning on Monday.

“Our educators will do their best tomorrow,” the Ottawa Catholic Council said in a statement Sunday announcing the shift to distance learning. “However, most had planned an in-person learning day, so a transition to a full synchronous learning day may need to be accommodated.”

Community immunization clinics have also been closed in Ottawa due to weather conditions. Ottawa Public Health said on Twitter that staff would contact those affected by the closure.

Snowfall in southern Ontario has added a wrinkle to the province’s already controversial school reopening plan.

The province switched to online learning after the winter break, so schools not closed by snow will reopen for the first time in nearly a month.

Ontario isn’t the only province feeling the effects of winter. In Quebec, some school boards were closing due to weather conditions.

Stay off the roads if you can, says OPP officer

WATCH | Driving conditions are “unfair” in parts of southern Ontario, according to the sergeant. Kerry Schmidt says:

A day to avoid the roads, says Ontario police officer

Saying driving conditions are “treacherous” in southern Ontario due to a major winter storm, Sgt. Kerry Schmidt of the Ontario Provincial Police has asked drivers to stay off the roads until the snow stops falling. 3:47

Ontario Provincial Police Sergeant Kerry Schmidt told CBC’s Heather Hiscox on Monday that people who can stay home should do so.

“It’s a mess here,” said Schmidt, who was on Highway 401 near Pearson International Airport.

Vehicles spin in circles and lose control, he said.

Plows are trying to keep up, he said, but have been hampered by snowfall and traffic volumes.

The Ontario Provincial Police Traffic Safety Division reminded drivers on Sunday evening to make sure to clean their cars thoroughly if they have to hit the road.

If you need to travel, expect delays

Toronto’s transit operator warned of delays on Monday, saying bus and streetcar routes were affected by snow.

“Customers will experience longer than normal wait and travel times,” the Toronto Transit Commission said on its website.

Some GO Transit Lines serving the densely populated Greater Toronto Area were also reporting delays.

Air Canada, meanwhile, issued an update stating that flights through major airports in Ontario and Quebec “may be affected by anticipated winter operating conditions.”

Dozens of flights to and from Toronto Pearson Airport were also delayed or canceled this morning, according to the airport’s website.

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Demand for red meat declines in Canada: report https://celenire.com/demand-for-red-meat-declines-in-canada-report/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 00:54:26 +0000 https://celenire.com/demand-for-red-meat-declines-in-canada-report/ Consumption and demand for meat is declining in Canada due to falling household incomes, soaring meat prices and a struggling restaurant industry, according to a new report. “As incomes fall or prices rise…we expect meat consumption to decline as households cut back on more expensive meals,” says the Farm Credit Canada (FCC) report. “Recurring shutdowns […]]]>

Consumption and demand for meat is declining in Canada due to falling household incomes, soaring meat prices and a struggling restaurant industry, according to a new report.

“As incomes fall or prices rise…we expect meat consumption to decline as households cut back on more expensive meals,” says the Farm Credit Canada (FCC) report. “Recurring shutdowns and food service closures have also reduced meat consumption.”

FCC is a Crown corporation that provides financial services and loans to farmers to support the sector. In a January report on economic trends in agriculture and food, FCC said continued inflation due to the COVID-19 pandemic underlies many of the costs and concerns currently facing farmers. Canadians.

“Animal protein was not immune to the inflationary pressures seen elsewhere,” the report adds.

Using data from Statistics Canada, the report showed that beef demand began to steadily decline after peaking at the end of 2020. Since 2021, Canadians appear to be compensating by buying more chicken.

“Chicken demand rebounded in 2021 in response to widespread reopenings of food services and possibly higher red meat prices inducing red meat substitution,” the report said.

Besides rising meat prices, the report also showed how the COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased shipping costs and labor shortages, while the widespread drought of 2021 has had a negative impact on the production of economically vital crops such as wheat, canola and barley.

“Last year was not the year of the recovery and respite we thought was imminent after the horror story of 2020,” the report said. “Throughout 2022, we will be watching closely to see if demand indices return to pre-pandemic levels and resume growth.”

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Coronavirus: Some nurses still don’t have proper PPE https://celenire.com/coronavirus-some-nurses-still-dont-have-proper-ppe/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 09:45:03 +0000 https://celenire.com/coronavirus-some-nurses-still-dont-have-proper-ppe/ OTTAWA – When news of the first cases of COVID-19 began to emerge in Canada in early 2020, Linda Silas was one of the first to sound the alarm about the lack of proper personal protective equipment for health workers. As early indications showed the virus was spreading through droplets that landed on surfaces, Silas, […]]]>

OTTAWA – When news of the first cases of COVID-19 began to emerge in Canada in early 2020, Linda Silas was one of the first to sound the alarm about the lack of proper personal protective equipment for health workers.

As early indications showed the virus was spreading through droplets that landed on surfaces, Silas, president of the Canadian Nurses Federation, urged health authorities to learn from the 2003 SARS outbreak. and to take the highest level of precaution.

Now she knows she was right – the virus is airborne – but she is still desperately asking for more protective equipment for nurses two years later.

Regional unions across the country are reporting that nurses who have requested fit-tested respirators still cannot get them in some cases, despite the Omicron variant being far more transmissible than previous variants.

The shortage of healthy nurses to deal with the massive surge of the Omicron variant has meant that hospitals and other healthcare facilities have deployed nurses with confirmed cases of COVID-19, and some still go unseen. come up with appropriate masks, she said.

“These vulnerable patients could have COVID-positive staff caring for them, and without the proper PPE, that’s just plain dangerous,” she said.

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, describes the spread of COVID-19 as a cloud of smoke coming from someone’s mouth and nose. She and other doctors have suggested the public use more effective masks to protect themselves.

Silas said often in places such as vaccination clinics, members of the public seem better equipped with the proper protective gear than health care workers.

“It’s a hodgepodge, and it’s a fight,” Silas said in an interview with The Canadian Press. “In long-term care it’s a real struggle, in community care it’s a real struggle and in acute care it depends on where you work.”

Different hospitals seem to take different approaches when it comes to providing PPE to nurses, which doesn’t make sense, she said, “because science is science.”

Canada’s supply chain is likely to blame, said University of Windsor professor Anne Snowdon, a registered nurse who studies health systems and supply chains.

“The problem has always been the supply chain. The result of our supply chain limitations is not being able to access these protective products that are so important in reducing the risk of transmission of this virus to our workforce- work, and also for our patients,” Snowdon said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

The scarcity of PPE supplies was perhaps more understandable at the start of the pandemic, but critics like Silas wonder how Canada could still find itself in a similar predicament in many parts of the healthcare system.

The answer, Snowdon said, is that the infrastructure was so bad to begin with.

“We build the bridges we ride on,” she said.

In other sectors, such as construction, essential workers would not be in the same situation, Silas said, because they would have the right to refuse to work in unsafe conditions.

But health workers cannot do the same without the ethical guilt of abandoning patients. It’s the same guilt that drives nurses to work 16-24 hours or take on large patient loads, she said.

“It is this ethical guilt that weighs on health care personnel.”

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on January 14, 2022.

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How to build resilience when there is “no end in sight” to the pandemic https://celenire.com/how-to-build-resilience-when-there-is-no-end-in-sight-to-the-pandemic/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 14:01:17 +0000 https://celenire.com/how-to-build-resilience-when-there-is-no-end-in-sight-to-the-pandemic/ It may seem like an eternity, but it has only been about six weeks or so that many Canadians have been enthusiastically making travel plans for the holidays and eager to celebrate in person with loved ones – some even booking trips. It was another time. A time when COVID-19 cases were declining amid an […]]]>

It may seem like an eternity, but it has only been about six weeks or so that many Canadians have been enthusiastically making travel plans for the holidays and eager to celebrate in person with loved ones – some even booking trips.

It was another time. A time when COVID-19 cases were declining amid an increase in vaccinations.

Then, on November 26, The World Health Organization has announced a new coronavirus “variant of concern”.

Omicron appeared to have caused millions of stomachs to contract simultaneously and morale to plummet. The little light that people were just starting to make out at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel darkened again, closely followed by their moods. But there is hope, say mental health experts.

WATCH | Will the virus continue to mutate?

How will this pandemic end?

Dr Christopher Mody, from the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the University of Calgary, says that until we stop the virus that causes the COVID-19 mutation, there will continue to be variants. The solution? “We need to get people vaccinated,” he says. 6:05

“It was just that feeling of, like ‘Oh, I’m giving up,’ said Claudia Casper, author and professor of creative writing at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.

Casper, 64, who is doubly vaccinated and boosted, planned to bring 22 people to her home in West Vancouver for Christmas. With the news from Omicron, the party has shrunk to 10 fully vaccinated guests.

“You just want to stop craving anything”

But when Casper’s husband woke up from a nap on Christmas Day feeling exhausted, that all changed. They weren’t sure if it was COVID-19, but an hour before the guests arrived, they called everyone and canceled.

“There comes a time when you just want to stop craving anything,” Casper said. “Because it’s too difficult or overwhelmed. “

Indeed, say mental health experts, the longer stress lasts, the more damaging it is to people’s mental health.

Last spring, Dr. Roger McIntyre described COVID-19 as a source of “daily stress, unpredictable, clever “ having a physiological impact on people’s brains. It left people demotivated and defeated, wondering how they were going to get through this time.

The good news, said the professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the University of Toronto, was that the brain is resilient and once stress is removed it will heal.

Roger McIntyre, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the University of Toronto, says it can be difficult to cope with uncertainty. (Submitted by Roger McIntyre)

But, nine months later, with a still broken brain, McIntyre says that a lot of people’s worry has now gone from ‘How am I going to get over this?’ to “When will this pandemic end?”

“It’s concerning,” he said, “because it evokes, I think, an underlying fear that this is going on and on.”

It can be difficult for individuals to be resilient in the face of such a vast unknown.

“It’s a range of impacts and uncertainties, but more importantly you just can’t really plan,” said Regardt Ferreira, director of the Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy and associate professor at the School of Social. Work at Tulane University in New Orleans.

“It has been going on for two years and, yes … there is no end in sight,” he said.

Prescribe yourself “hedonic activity”

So how do you stay strong?

McIntyre advises people to take control of what they can in order to maintain a sense of authority over themselves and their environment.

“You have to prescribe yourself some hedonic activity,” he said. “You must prescribe cognitive activity. You must prescribe physical activity.”

And it also comes down to the basics: get enough sleep, get enough physical activity. And, said McIntyre, it’s important to exercise portion control when it comes to eating and drinking alcohol.

“The more you rate your level of self-control,” he said, “the less you report the level of stress and anxiety in your life.

Regardt Ferreira, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at Tulane University in New Orleans, says people often come out of disasters better equipped to cope with adversity in the future. (Submitted by Reggie Ferreira)

Ferreira, who has studied the impact of natural and technological disasters on people’s resilience, said there is evidence that once people experience a disaster – whether it is a flood or d ” a fire, nuclear meltdown or oil spill – they often emerge better equipped to face disaster again.

“The more disasters you experience, the more you prepare,” he said. “It also leads to long-term resilience, because you kind of have an idea what to expect. ”

It was also part of a study that looked at predictors of resilience in the face of the pandemic.

In this current major wave of COVID-19, Canadians have a lot of accumulated experience, Ferreira said. “So we kind of have an idea of ​​what to expect and what action to take, and that helps increase our resilience.”

There is comfort and strength to be gained, he said, in maintaining social distancing, wearing a mask and sanitizing his hands. “It sounds simplistic, but it seems to be what works,” he said.

“More isolated … more anxiety”

Yet, McIntyre noted, humans do not have infinite resilience.

“There’s a point of no return for some people and that triggers, you know, things like depression that they end up going through long after the stressor is gone.”

Already, Kids Help Phone said it had seen a 127% increase in interactions related to COVID-19 topics since November 2021 – just before Omicron emerged. The topics of the calls and texts ranged from everything from canceled vacation plans and missing friends and family to worrying about being late for school.

There was also a 209 percent increase in texts about suicide and an almost equally high increase in conversations about depression.

All of this together, said Alisa Simon, Executive Vice President, Head of Youth and Innovation at Kids Help Phone, suggests that young people “feel more isolated, they feel more anxious, they feel sad, they feel a pain. feeling of loss ”.

No pressure to “bounce back”

Casper – whose husband ended up testing negative for COVID-19 – said she would have described herself as “resilient” before the pandemic, and is confident she will be fine.

“I’m going to bounce back, but I think I’ll be different. I’m actually quite interested in seeing,” she said.

Claudia Casper, seen here with her dog Lucita, says she feels like she’s going to get through the pandemic properly but will be different. (Aislinn Hunter)

Ferreira says that for some people it will be important not to feel the pressure to go back to who they were.

“Resilience is really your ability to withstand adversity and what lessons do you take from your future experience to resist or grow,” he said.

Society fosters resilience, but Ferreira said setting the same expectations at all levels can be detrimental.

“Not everyone has the means because they don’t have access to the resources to make them resilient,” he said.

What Ferreira and McIntyre come back to, however, over and over again, is the benefit of a simple human connection.

“Something as simple as checking in with someone if you feel something is wrong,” he said, “and again, you know, be aware of the resources available – there this is an online discussion board or if there is an online group discussion forum that they can participate in.

“We are resilient people,” McIntyre said. “The more support you have from your community, your family, and the more innate intrinsic resources you have, the more likely you are to adapt and be resilient.”


If you need help, or just need someone to talk to, here are some resources:

  • Kids Help Phone: 1-800-668-6868. You can also send CONNECT by SMS to 686868.
  • Wellness Together Canada: Provides support to children, adults, frontline workers and Indigenous peoples
  • Canadian Suicide Prevention Service: 1-833-456-4566, and in French at 1-866-APPELLE 1-866-277-3553
  • Hope for Well-Being Line for Indigenous Peoples: 1-855-242-3310. You can also connect online.
  • Crisis Services Canada: 1 (833) 456-4566 (24/7) or by text to 45645 (4 p.m. to 12 p.m. ET)
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Canada’s Bitfarms Bought $ 43 Million In Bitcoin In $ 300 Billion Crypto Crash https://celenire.com/canadas-bitfarms-bought-43-million-in-bitcoin-in-300-billion-crypto-crash/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 14:12:59 +0000 https://celenire.com/canadas-bitfarms-bought-43-million-in-bitcoin-in-300-billion-crypto-crash/ Top line Canadian bitcoin mining company Bitfarms announced on Monday that it had invested $ 43.2 million in bitcoin as the cryptocurrency fell about 12% in the first week of the year, becoming the last listed company on the stock market to double in the nascent crypto market despite some experts warning that its volatility […]]]>

Top line

Canadian bitcoin mining company Bitfarms announced on Monday that it had invested $ 43.2 million in bitcoin as the cryptocurrency fell about 12% in the first week of the year, becoming the last listed company on the stock market to double in the nascent crypto market despite some experts warning that its volatility makes it an unreliable investment.

Highlights

In a statement on Monday, Toronto-based Bitfarms said it bought 1,000 bitcoins in the first week of January, bringing its holdings to more than 4,300 coins worth around $ 175 million; For comparison, Bitfarms reported revenue of around $ 121 million in the 12 months ending in September.

“With the decline in bitcoin, we have seized the opportunity to transfer money to BTC,” Bitfarms founder and CEO Emiliano Grodzki said in the statement, while adding that the “guiding strategy” of the The business is to accumulate the most bitcoin at the lowest cost and in the fastest time.

Nasdaq-listed Bitfarms shares fell about 4% in pre-market trading after the announcement, roughly following the larger cryptocurrency market’s losses of around 3% in the past 24 hours. .

Bitfarms’ investment comes less than a week after MicroStrategy, the data analytics firm run by Bitcoin bull billionaire Michael Saylor, revealed it bought nearly 2,000 bitcoins for $ 94 million at the start. December, as prices also struggled to recoup losses after a staggering record run. in November.

Bitfarms says it has bought nearly 70% of its total bitcoin holdings since the third quarter of last year, a massive investment that saw stocks skyrocket to 125%, before bitcoin’s plunge in November. does not help bring down the title by more than 50%.

Large number

10 billion dollars. That’s roughly how much about 20 state-owned companies with a market capitalization of over $ 1,000 billion invested in bitcoin, according to London-based crypto firm Nickel Digital Asset Management. MicroStrategy, which owns more bitcoin than any other company in the world, holds around 124,400 coins worth nearly $ 5.1 billion, while Tesla’s roughly 43,200 coins are worth around 1.8 billion dollars. dollars.

Contra

“Bitcoin’s volatility shows that companies cannot rely on cryptocurrencies as strong corporate treasury investments,” wrote Jerry Klein, the managing partner of $ 9 billion Treasury Partners, in a report. -mail to Forbes last month. “Private investors get none of the candy, but all of the indigestion when they invest in bitcoin.” Accounting rules require companies to treat bitcoin as an intangible asset, Klein says, which means companies “have to write down the value if the price drops, but they can’t write it down if the price appreciates.”

Key context

Trading at around $ 40,800 on Monday morning, bitcoin has plunged about 40% from a record high of $ 69,000 in November, as the broader market is in shock at the prospect that central banks are pulling faster than expected from the economic recovery in the pandemic era. “The long-term outlook is still bullish for the two major cryptocurrencies, but the near term looks lousy,” Oanda’s senior market analyst Ed Moya wrote in a weekend note. Despite episodes of intense bitcoin volatility, Goldman Sachs analysts wrote in a note to clients last week that the cryptocurrency could surpass $ 100,000 in the next five years as it increasingly competes. with gold as an inflationary hedge. For now, the latest downside has driven the value of global cryptocurrencies, currently around $ 1.9 trillion, down to over $ 300 billion over the past week.

Further reading

“Looking Ugly”: Crypto Prices Fall Again After $ 300 Billion Sale: How Far Can Bitcoin Go? (Forbes)

Major Cryptocurrencies Including Bitcoin and Ethereum Crash After Fed Minutes Signal Looming Interest Rate Hike (Forbes)

Bitcoin’s Largest Corporate Backer Announces $ 94 Million Investment Amid $ 250 Billion Crypto Market Crash (Forbes)

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‘Open wound in the sky’: Families honor loved ones who died when Iran shot down airliner 2 years ago https://celenire.com/open-wound-in-the-sky-families-honor-loved-ones-who-died-when-iran-shot-down-airliner-2-years-ago/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 21:38:19 +0000 https://celenire.com/open-wound-in-the-sky-families-honor-loved-ones-who-died-when-iran-shot-down-airliner-2-years-ago/ The families of those who died on board an airliner shot down by Iranian military forces two years ago commemorate their loved ones on Saturday in a solemn ceremony. Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps fired two surface-to-air missiles at the Ukraine International Airlines flight on January 8, 2020, shortly after takeoff in Tehran, killing everyone […]]]>

The families of those who died on board an airliner shot down by Iranian military forces two years ago commemorate their loved ones on Saturday in a solemn ceremony.

Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps fired two surface-to-air missiles at the Ukraine International Airlines flight on January 8, 2020, shortly after takeoff in Tehran, killing everyone on board.

Dozens of Canadian citizens and permanent residents were among those who died. More than 100 of the 176 people killed in the crash had ties to Canada.

A virtual ceremony organized by the Association of Families of Victims of Flight PS752 marking the second anniversary of the tragedy, entitled “The Open Wound in the Sky”, began at 2 pm. She began with a recorded Persian recitation of the poem Threshold by the late Iranian poet Ahmad Shamlou, followed by a video summarizing the events since the crash and the families’ continued struggle for justice.

Three mothers who lost family members in the crash then took turns reading aloud the names and ages of each of the 176 victims.

“Two years ago today (…) the world lost 176 hopeful and hopeful people due to an unimaginable act of brutality,” said Amirali Alavi, the event’s MC. , whose mother died in the accident.

“They were children, students, young couples, entire families and innocent people all around who were dearly loved and now sorely missed.”

Videos that were shown throughout the ceremony carried messages from family members who continue to cry.

“The crash of the plane, the murder of all these young people, all these decent human beings, is like the death of my own hopes and desires,” said one woman.

Another asked, “What have my beloved child, my dear daughter-in-law and their sweet traveling companions done to deserve to be set on fire by you in the skies of our homeland?”

A mourner lights candles at a memorial to mark the first anniversary of the destruction of Flight PS752, in Edmonton on January 8, 2021. (Jason Franson / The Canadian Press)

Hamed Esmaeilion, the president of the association who lost his wife and nine-year-old daughter in the tragedy, passionately expressed his frustration at the Iranian regime’s lack of responsibility for what he called “blood murder. -cold”.

“They told us to be patient and we listened. They told us that all options were on the table, and we waited for those options to be checked. But now, after two years, we realize that our patience didn’t pay off, “Esmaeilion says. “Canada must stand up for justice, and it is time for all of us to side with the right side of history – today, now and urgently.

The group demands that the case be brought before the International Civil Aviation Organization – a United Nations agency based in Montreal – and that the RCMP launch a criminal investigation.

He also calls for arrest warrants and official government sanctions against senior Iranian political and military leaders, and the designation of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organization.

The association said the virtual portion of the ceremony will be followed by an outdoor vigil in Toronto at Mel Lastman Square. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Minister of Foreign Affairs Mélanie Joly, Premier of Ontario Doug Ford and Mayor of Toronto John Tory participated virtually.

Hamed Esmaeilion at his family’s grave. His wife, Parisa Eghbalian, and his nine-year-old daughter, Reera, were killed when flight PS752 was shot down over Iran on January 8, 2020. (Samira Mohyeddin / CBC)

Earlier this week, Iran snubbed another deadline set by Canada and its allies to negotiate a settlement for the families.

Trudeau said the federal government will continue to support the families of victims and fight for accountability, transparency and justice.

“Flight PS752 was shot down due to the recklessness and total disregard for human life of Iranian officials. We cannot allow this to last,” he said at the ceremony.

“Now that Iran has failed to meet the negotiating target, we will vigorously pursue other international accountability and justice mechanisms. Canada will stand alongside members of the [International Co-ordination and Response Group for the victims of Flight PS752] as a united front and we will not rest until Iran is held accountable, ”Trudeau said, referring to a group of countries that lost citizens in the crash.


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Three life-changing encounters in Canada https://celenire.com/three-life-changing-encounters-in-canada/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 01:21:31 +0000 https://celenire.com/three-life-changing-encounters-in-canada/ Forget the old-fashioned travel bucket list. Post-pandemic international travelers want to step up a gear. Rather than ticking off tourist attractions in quick succession, Australian travelers seek meaningful experiences – and Canada has them in spades. From watching a Northern Lights spectacle of epic proportions to encountering a grizzly bear feasting on salmon in the […]]]>

Forget the old-fashioned travel bucket list. Post-pandemic international travelers want to step up a gear. Rather than ticking off tourist attractions in quick succession, Australian travelers seek meaningful experiences – and Canada has them in spades.

From watching a Northern Lights spectacle of epic proportions to encountering a grizzly bear feasting on salmon in the wild, Canada’s legendary adventures will change you everywhere, and always for the better.

Read on for three experiences that will leave a lasting mark on your heart.

Fantastic light travel

Immerse yourself in a quintessential winter postcard in Northwest Yukon. Breathe in the fresh scent of snow-capped boreal forests as you weave through the trees on a sled, pulled by a horny team of huskies.

Later, the dark winter sky becomes the perfect backdrop as you lift your gaze to admire the vibrant greens, purples and pinks of the enchanting Northern Lights as they kiss in a light show that rivals with a choreographed intergalactic laser battle.

There is more than one way to view this majestic light show. Take refuge in a prospector-style wall tent once used by gold diggers and trappers with Northern Tales Travel Service, keeping warm by the woodstove. Bundle up and step out for the big performance, as vibrant, colorful ribbons cascade across the sky.

You can also stay at a lodge surrounded by nature, like the Northern Lights Resort and Spa, where you can take in the views from your glass-enclosed chalet, or bathe in an outdoor hot tub as the light show stretches across the night sky.

Insider tip: The Northern Lights Center is well worth a visit. Located in Watson Lake, the center features a domed theater with a panoramic video and surround sound system that is as close to the real thing as possible. Learn about the myths and legends of the Northern Lights and the real science behind them.

Join Brian Johnston on a transformative Northern Lights tour of the Yukon wilderness here.

Fall in love with the most romantic city in the world

As you walk through the cobbled streets of Quebec, the charm is cast. It’s a city you experience with your heart rather than your head, and before you know it, you’re in love.

There is something about the old world charm of this ancient urban center, with its 400-year-old architecture, stunning historic churches, and creative, French-speaking people who make you wish you could stay forever.

Shop for antiques along the Petit Champlain district, one of the oldest neighborhoods in North America, and experience a sweet sensory explosion with local maple syrup treats and bespoke creations from resident chocolatiers.

Take a moment to marvel at the imposing mural in Place Royale, retracing 400 years of Quebec history. It is here on this small square that Samuel de Champlain founded the city in 1608.

Complete the fairytale with a stay at the world’s most photographed hotel, the Fairmont The Chateau Frontenac. This spectacular castle with its turrets and distinctive green roof, embodies the architectural styles of earlier periods, including the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Despite its rich history, Quebec’s gastronomic scene is innovative on a global scale. Click here for a first-hand take on the city’s food scene and to meet authentic Quebecois characters who instantly feel like lifelong friends.

These guys are amazingly bright

Ask any Australian traveler what they love most about Canada’s vast wilderness, and many will get lyrical about that mesmerizing moment they saw a bear (or three) roaming free in the wild.

Witnessing these awe-inspiring beasts in their natural habitat is an unforgettable and humbling moment, with Australians keen to experience it for themselves now that international travel is back on the maps.

The Khutzeymateen / K’tzim-a-deen Grizzly Bear Sanctuary in British Columbia was the first area in Canada to be protected specifically for grizzly bears, and is one of the best places in the world to see these magnificent animals in their natural habitat.

Accessible only by boat and / or seaplane, the site is home to around 60 individual bears, best visited between May and September, when bears can be seen roaming the shore.

The Princess Royal’s Magical Island in the Great Bear Rainforest, British Columbia, is home to not only a healthy population of grizzly bears, but also the rare Kermode (Spirit) bear, a subspecies of black bear that l Only this part of the world is found carrying a recessive gene which gives them a naturally white coat.

In neighboring Alberta, take a serene ride above Banff National Park on the Lake Louise Gondola.

This spectacular bird’s-eye view provides the perfect vantage point for viewing the grizzly bears below, not to mention equally breathtaking views of Lake Louise and the Rocky Mountains. Other bear viewing opportunities await you at the top, as well as a wildlife interpretation center and guided hikes.

Read on to experience (vicariously) this special moment when a grizzly bears your mesmerized gaze, deep in the Canadian wilderness.

Main image credit: Jonathon Tucker


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Poll asked Canadians where they would feel comfortable living, and Quebec came last https://celenire.com/poll-asked-canadians-where-they-would-feel-comfortable-living-and-quebec-came-last/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 01:32:23 +0000 https://celenire.com/poll-asked-canadians-where-they-would-feel-comfortable-living-and-quebec-came-last/ Few Canadians outside of Quebec would be comfortable rooting in the province, suggests a recent Maru / Blue poll. The survey asked 1,510 Canadians in December 2021 about their comfort level living in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada (New Brunswick, New Brunswick). -Scotland, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador). […]]]>

Few Canadians outside of Quebec would be comfortable rooting in the province, suggests a recent Maru / Blue poll.

The survey asked 1,510 Canadians in December 2021 about their comfort level living in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada (New Brunswick, New Brunswick). -Scotland, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador). Residents were unable to answer the question about their own province or region.

The results published by Maru Public Opinion show that British Columbia was the most attractive region in Canada. When asked, 65% of respondents strongly or somewhat agreed that they would feel comfortable living there.

The West Coast province was followed by Atlantic Canada (63%). Ontario and Alberta were the distant thirds (49% each). 38% of respondents said they would be comfortable living in Saskatchewan or Manitoba.

In last place was Quebec, where only 24% of survey respondents would be comfortable living.

Maru cautions, however, that the survey did not ask about respondents’ reasoning.

“Remember that a place where people feel comfortable living is purely subjective. heard about the people, the economy or how they can be welcoming to newcomers, ”the company said in a statement.

Quebec, of course, is the only province where French is the only official and common language. Only 3.8% of residents of Canada outside Quebec identified themselves as Francophones in the 2016 census, according to Statistics Canada.


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